stitch666
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Hi,
I am wondering if any one has any views, or can think of any benefits, of being a chartered psychologist but without being able to gain HCPC accreditation.

For some context if one were to complete a MSc Psychology (gaining GBC) and then completed research in psychology to a doctorate level (enables chartership) but hasn't done a HCPC recognised psychology course - what can one do being a chartered psychologist with no HCPC registration?
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bones-mccoy
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From my understanding, you need HCPC registration to actually practice as a psychologist. There are also several protected titles that you can't use unless HCPC registered.

So, you don't need BPS chartership to work as a psychologist, but you do need HCPC registration.
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Interrobang
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HCPC registered psychologists are practitioner psychologists (clinical, educational, health, counselling, forensic, occupational, sports) - you cannot use any of these titles without HCPC registration. You could be a chartered through working at a university, for example. The directory of chartered psychologists suggests also checking the HCPC register

According to this: https://www.bps.org.uk/sites/www.bps...%282020%29.pdf there's no real benefit to being a chartered member in comparison to a graduate member unless you want to be searchable on their list
Last edited by Interrobang; 7 months ago
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Nerol
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(Original post by stitch666)
Hi,
I am wondering if any one has any views, or can think of any benefits, of being a chartered psychologist but without being able to gain HCPC accreditation.

For some context if one were to complete a MSc Psychology (gaining GBC) and then completed research in psychology to a doctorate level (enables chartership) but hasn't done a HCPC recognised psychology course - what can one do being a chartered psychologist with no HCPC registration?
Not really sure what the benefits would be in that case. If you do a PhD, you can then go on to work in research or academia, but will not be able to work as a practitioner psychologist. You could go on to do a professional doctorate if this is what you want to do.
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by stitch666)
Hi,
I am wondering if any one has any views, or can think of any benefits, of being a chartered psychologist but without being able to gain HCPC accreditation.

For some context if one were to complete a MSc Psychology (gaining GBC) and then completed research in psychology to a doctorate level (enables chartership) but hasn't done a HCPC recognised psychology course - what can one do being a chartered psychologist with no HCPC registration?
Interesting question.

Chartership denotes an overall level of competency. Before the HCPC started regulating the practitioners in 2008, Chartership (or eligibility for chartership) was really the line of who was a "real" psychologist vs. who wasn't. It still sort of is for academic or research psychologists as it indicates a certain level of training which was BPS recognised undergrad plus substantial postgrad qualifications and training under an accreddited supervisor. That level of training and development is still nothing to be sniffed at and may result in you being taken seriously by your peers, and people who actually know what being a psychologist involves.

The other thing to consider is that psychology is a constantly evolving field, and while domains such as clinical and educational are seen as the current pillars of psychology, that may change in the future. Having chartership is probably more important when you are establishing a new area that isn't currently protected or HCPC regulated. For instance, if you were to develop a new field of transhuman psychology, having your CPsychol could be a separate standard of who can and who can't call themselves a Transhuman psychologist (if that is how you wanted to set up that field).
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Psephologist1
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Generally you need HCPC registration to become a chartered psychologist; the BPS only accredits courses for good reason. My advice for aspiring psychologists is check the BPS website first before applying.
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stitch666
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
Interesting question.

Chartership denotes an overall level of competency. Before the HCPC started regulating the practitioners in 2008, Chartership (or eligibility for chartership) was really the line of who was a "real" psychologist vs. who wasn't. It still sort of is for academic or research psychologists as it indicates a certain level of training which was BPS recognised undergrad plus substantial postgrad qualifications and training under an accreddited supervisor. That level of training and development is still nothing to be sniffed at and may result in you being taken seriously by your peers, and people who actually know what being a psychologist involves.

The other thing to consider is that psychology is a constantly evolving field, and while domains such as clinical and educational are seen as the current pillars of psychology, that may change in the future. Having chartership is probably more important when you are establishing a new area that isn't currently protected or HCPC regulated. For instance, if you were to develop a new field of transhuman psychology, having your CPsychol could be a separate standard of who can and who can't call themselves a Transhuman psychologist (if that is how you wanted to set up that field).
Thanks this is an interesting answer and probably relates more to what I was thinking about.

For further context I am a BABCP Accredited CBT therapist, and I have a MSc in Psychology giving me GBC. Furthermore I am a PhD student in a psychological area (developmental trauma) which according to the BPS could allow me to apply for chartership. I was trying to find out if there are actually any real world advantages in doing do. I can never be considered a practitioner psychologist as I will never do a stage 2, or an accredited course such as the clin psych.
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by stitch666)
Thanks this is an interesting answer and probably relates more to what I was thinking about.

For further context I am a BABCP Accredited CBT therapist, and I have a MSc in Psychology giving me GBC. Furthermore I am a PhD student in a psychological area (developmental trauma) which according to the BPS could allow me to apply for chartership. I was trying to find out if there are actually any real world advantages in doing do. I can never be considered a practitioner psychologist as I will never do a stage 2, or an accredited course such as the clin psych.
In that situation there may be some advantages depending on how your career pans out.

It's probably less important if you shelter under an organisation like a University (because you would have another source of credibility such as Senior Lecturer/Professor at University of X) or the NHS with a recognised designation like Director of Psychological Therapies that would give you some kudos.

The trickier thing is if you aren't able to secure an academic post with your PhD and climb that ladder, which is a tough proposition even during the boom time. In an independent role, the CPsychol gives you that senior affliation to a recognised respected body -the BPS. While your BABCP status gives you some of that, it's as a therapist rather than a scientist-practitioner. That's really great if you want a job in an IAPT service, but not necessarily viewed the same way in the broader psychology world.

Here are some examples where a CPsychol could be useful in demonstrating expertise and credibility without needing an institutional affiliation:

http://www.mas.org.uk/about-us/derek-mowbray.html
https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-...alSubdomain=uk
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