uniquelol12
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Hiya, I was wondering if anyone could help me get started with learning the Latin language. I’m not sure where to start as I don’t have a Latin background, I’m 18 and the schools I’ve gone to have never offered it. I would like to be able to read the Aeneid, I’m not sure how hard that would be but any help is appreciated
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becausethenight
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That's amazing, more Latinists in the world is a good thing

Most people will start off with the Cambridge Latin Course, which is a really good set of beginner's textbooks. The Cambridge Latin people's website also indicates that they do distance learning (https://www.dl.cambridgescp.com/home-dl) which you might want to check out - I've not done it so can't comment, but I do think having a class and teacher helps with learning a language! They also have free online activities (https://www.clc.cambridgescp.com/online-activities)

Just googling it as well, there's a free Getting Started with Classical Latin OU course here: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/histo...escription-tab which could be good?

By "the alien" I'm guessing you mean the Aeneid? That's a big goal, but it's doable - again, while GCSE students read Aeneid extracts, they do it with a teacher who can guide them through it, so you might want to join a reading group when you start feeling confident in Latin, rather than puzzling through alone. Perseus.tufts.edu is a useful resource for much later on as it will define words for you and show you a (often archaic) English translation alongside your Latin.

I hope that's helpful, good luck
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RoseRip
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This is all I can remember from learning it in school
Amo
Amas
Amat
Amammus
Amatis
Amant
😁
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uniquelol12
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(Original post by becausethenight)
That's amazing, more Latinists in the world is a good thing

Most people will start off with the Cambridge Latin Course, which is a really good set of beginner's textbooks. The Cambridge Latin people's website also indicates that they do distance learning (https://www.dl.cambridgescp.com/home-dl) which you might want to check out - I've not done it so can't comment, but I do think having a class and teacher helps with learning a language! They also have free online activities (https://www.clc.cambridgescp.com/online-activities)

Just googling it as well, there's a free Getting Started with Classical Latin OU course here: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/histo...escription-tab which could be good?

By "the alien" I'm guessing you mean the Aeneid? That's a big goal, but it's doable - again, while GCSE students read Aeneid extracts, they do it with a teacher who can guide them through it, so you might want to join a reading group when you start feeling confident in Latin, rather than puzzling through alone. Perseus.tufts.edu is a useful resource for much later on as it will define words for you and show you a (often archaic) English translation alongside your Latin.

I hope that's helpful, good luck
thank you so much for the help, I really appreciate it!
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Declarations
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I had the same thought as you and did some research and found a great book called 'Lingua Latina Familia Romana'. Although it's somewhat hard to use on its own, it's great for improving reading proficiency!
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mnot
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facite. laetus eris tu
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becausethenight
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(Original post by RoseRip)
This is all I can remember from learning it in school
Amo
Amas
Amat
Amammus
Amatis
Amant
😁
I'm a pedant: *amamus
And let us not forget, mensa, mensa, mensam, mensae, mensae, mensa...

(Original post by uniquelol12)
thank you so much for the help, I really appreciate it!
No problem, go forth and develop into a brilliant Latinist
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RoseRip
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(Original post by becausethenight)
No problem, go forth and develop into a brilliant Latinist
Ahaha I’m sorry for my spelling,
I haven’t studied it for 4 years
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becausethenight
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(Original post by RoseRip)
Ahaha I’m sorry for my spelling,
I haven’t studied it for 4 years
Don't worry, I'm just being a Classics pedant
I'm going to stop studying it after this year, a very sad thought...
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uniquelol12
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(Original post by Declarations)
I had the same thought as you and did some research and found a great book called 'Lingua Latina Familia Romana'. Although it's somewhat hard to use on its own, it's great for improving reading proficiency!
Well, anything will help. I just need a good jump start. I’ve heard with language learning vocabulary is more important than grammar so hopefully just gathering enough grammar will do as a starter as I work my up
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artful_lounger
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The OU offer a beginners module in Latin covering language and various texts in translation (including I believe a section on the Aeneid; I imagine some adapted versions of the texts in the original will also be provided but not necessarily examinable, which was the case with the Greek module), which may be of interest. UCL have a certificate of HE in the classical world, on which you can take language modules (I think you actually have to take at least one language module), which can also be taken part time. Both of these are still open for applications starting next year. I've not done Latin (yet) so can't comment on any of those options specifically though! As above it's probably easiest to get started in some more structured environment where you have a tutor/teacher/lecturer to guide you through the process of how to learn an ancient language initially.

For self-study (or to support structured studies as above) Wheelock's Latin is I believe the "standard" textbook used in the US, while in the UK Latin to GCSE 1 (and 2, later) seem to be common texts for beginners courses. There are probably plenty of alternatives as well, which may vary in quality; my Greek tutor (who also teaches latin) said the Reading Latin series is not that great compared to the Reading Greek books for example (although I think the texts & vocab book of Reading Greek is not great personally, although the grammar & exercises book I've found quite useful).
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LaGataSonriente
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(Original post by uniquelol12)
Hiya, I was wondering if anyone could help me get started with learning the Latin language. I’m not sure where to start as I don’t have a Latin background, I’m 18 and the schools I’ve gone to have never offered it. I would like to be able to read the Aeneid, I’m not sure how hard that would be but any help is appreciated
Once you have got started and are looking for a way to do some extra practice, Duolingo has a Latin option.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The OU offer a beginners module in Latin covering language and various texts in translation (including I believe a section on the Aeneid; I imagine some adapted versions of the texts in the original will also be provided but not necessarily examinable, which was the case with the Greek module), which may be of interest. UCL have a certificate of HE in the classical world, on which you can take language modules (I think you actually have to take at least one language module), which can also be taken part time. Both of these are still open for applications starting next year. I've not done Latin (yet) so can't comment on any of those options specifically though! As above it's probably easiest to get started in some more structured environment where you have a tutor/teacher/lecturer to guide you through the process of how to learn an ancient language initially.

For self-study (or to support structured studies as above) Wheelock's Latin is I believe the "standard" textbook used in the US, while in the UK Latin to GCSE 1 (and 2, later) seem to be common texts for beginners courses. There are probably plenty of alternatives as well, which may vary in quality; my Greek tutor (who also teaches latin) said the Reading Latin series is not that great compared to the Reading Greek books for example (although I think the texts & vocab book of Reading Greek is not great personally, although the grammar & exercises book I've found quite useful).
All of this is really good advice - I completely forgot about Latin to GCSE, despite it being practically a Latin bible. The only thing with Latin to GCSE is it's not great for self-study as it doesn't come with answers (to stop people cheating )

I would again really second the need for a teacher/structured learning, especially if you want to start on texts like the Aeneid

Also, artful_lounger, you do Ancient Greek but no Latin? Very hardcore
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macy_m
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(Original post by becausethenight)
Don't worry, I'm just being a Classics pedant
I'm going to stop studying it after this year, a very sad thought...
do you reckon me being fluent in italian could help me learn latin ? as i've come across certain sentences that i can understand
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becausethenight
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(Original post by macy_m)
do you reckon me being fluent in italian could help me learn latin ? as i've come across certain sentences that i can understand
Oh yeah, for sure. I speak fluent French and semi-fluent Spanish, and it's me helped a lot with vocab. Italian is even more similar (hence why you can understand stuff!) so it'll be really helpful
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macy_m
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(Original post by becausethenight)
Oh yeah, for sure. I speak fluent French and semi-fluent Spanish, and it's me helped a lot with vocab. Italian is even more similar (hence why you can understand stuff!) so it'll be really helpful
great! I've always wanted to learn more languages since italian has helped me get full marks in all my spanish tests haha. I've been trying to learn swedish and now i'll start latin. So italian, albanian, spanish, hopefully latin and swedish, and i understand most french and a lot of portuguese. Languages are amazing too bad i'm not taking any at a-level :bawling:
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uniquelol12
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The OU offer a beginners module in Latin covering language and various texts in translation (including I believe a section on the Aeneid; I imagine some adapted versions of the texts in the original will also be provided but not necessarily examinable, which was the case with the Greek module), which may be of interest. UCL have a certificate of HE in the classical world, on which you can take language modules (I think you actually have to take at least one language module), which can also be taken part time. Both of these are still open for applications starting next year. I've not done Latin (yet) so can't comment on any of those options specifically though! As above it's probably easiest to get started in some more structured environment where you have a tutor/teacher/lecturer to guide you through the process of how to learn an ancient language initially.

For self-study (or to support structured studies as above) Wheelock's Latin is I believe the "standard" textbook used in the US, while in the UK Latin to GCSE 1 (and 2, later) seem to be common texts for beginners courses. There are probably plenty of alternatives as well, which may vary in quality; my Greek tutor (who also teaches latin) said the Reading Latin series is not that great compared to the Reading Greek books for example (although I think the texts & vocab book of Reading Greek is not great personally, although the grammar & exercises book I've found quite useful).
I’ll definitely look into the use of the OU as a beginning guide then, thank you so much for this!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by becausethenight)
All of this is really good advice - I completely forgot about Latin to GCSE, despite it being practically a Latin bible. The only thing with Latin to GCSE is it's not great for self-study as it doesn't come with answers (to stop people cheating )

I would again really second the need for a teacher/structured learning, especially if you want to start on texts like the Aeneid

Also, artful_lounger, you do Ancient Greek but no Latin? Very hardcore
I hadn't planned on it really, but the OU is stopping offering their beginners Greek module, with this year being the last offering - so I realised if I did want to take it (which I had been musing on) it would need to be now or never! It was quite a lot to take in for sure though, although fortunately we weren't really required to learn much about accentuation and diacritics other than τίς/τί and breathings really, which simplified some things...also the exam got cancelled because of coronavirus so all my language work got assessed based on our coursework, which I had the benefit of dictionaries and my textbooks to double and triple check things as I worked through the translations (very slowly)!

In retrospect I think it definitely would've been easier if I had done Latin first, as I essentially had to learn basic grammar (i.e. just how grammar works and terminology), the Greek alphabet, and then the specific grammar and vocab of Greek all in one go (plus the literature in translation half of the module separate to that)! Getting used to the formalities of how grammar actually works (in English or otherwise) as well as some of the nuances of ancient languages/translation would've been much easier in the familiar Latin script initially I think
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becausethenight
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(Original post by macy_m)
great! I've always wanted to learn more languages since italian has helped me get full marks in all my spanish tests haha. I've been trying to learn swedish and now i'll start latin. So italian, albanian, spanish, hopefully latin and swedish, and i understand most french and a lot of portuguese. Languages are amazing too bad i'm not taking any at a-level :bawling:
Wow my inner linguist is so jealous that’s a really interesting collection of languages as well, can I ask why Swedish as one to learn?

Languages are the best, especially dead ones where I can’t embarrass myself with my accent Take a language A level they’re fun go on you know you want to
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barnetlad
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I don't know if any of the language courses such as duolingo offer it. What will suit you depends on how you think you will learn best.
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