How do you actually revise?!

Watch
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
Hello everyone. This sounds really silly but I actually don't know how to revise. I've been stressing about this a lot recently as I literally have no set technique when it comes to revising.
If anyone could please help me I would be really grateful.
What revision resources should I make?
How do I learn lots of information and actually remember it?
Any good techniques/advice?
Thank you!
0
reply

chibichibi_xx
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 weeks ago
#2
I made all of my notes on flashcards and well in advance (even before the topic was taught) using teachers powerpoints, textbooks, revision guides and websites, and took them to the lesson so I could add anything the teacher would say to my notes. I added mark scheme points in red pen (such as 6-8 markers on biological processes). When we had a topic test, the night before I would make A4 summary sheets - I wouldn’t cram everything in because that’s a waste of time and I’m just rewriting my notes, but key bits (such as things I’d always forget) would be bullet pointed. When I revised for mocks, I went over processes for bio using a whiteboard and seeing how much I could remember from memory. And I did A ****load of exam questions. Like they were my BFF and I had an A5 binder of them to do on the bus, free periods, lunch, and spare time during lessons if I had finished the task set by the teacher. (This is what I did for A-Level btw, I had nothing set for GCSE and I feel like although I did pretty well, I would’ve done better if I had used these techniques then). It’s a shame corona had to cancel everything because just when I had figured out what was right for me, exams were cancelled. Oh well.
2
reply
SashaNH
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 weeks ago
#3
I personally like to make mind maps and then look over them. I’ll then try to re create the mind map from my memory (usually on a whiteboard). Sometimes diagrams can work too! Sorry if this isn’t much help!
1
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Um,Bridge)
Hello everyone. This sounds really silly but I actually don't know how to revise. I've been stressing about this a lot recently as I literally have no set technique when it comes to revising.
If anyone could please help me I would be really grateful.
What revision resources should I make?
How do I learn lots of information and actually remember it?
Any good techniques/advice?
Thank you!
I have found focused wrote learning & repetition.
I really think keeping your mind glued in can often be the most difficult bit (i think scheduled mini breaks & rewards can really help stop your mind from wondering)
1
reply
qeachy
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by chibichibi_xx)
I made all of my notes on flashcards and well in advance (even before the topic was taught) using teachers powerpoints, textbooks, revision guides and websites, and took them to the lesson so I could add anything the teacher would say to my notes. I added mark scheme points in red pen (such as 6-8 markers on biological processes). When we had a topic test, the night before I would make A4 summary sheets - I wouldn’t cram everything in because that’s a waste of time and I’m just rewriting my notes, but key bits (such as things I’d always forget) would be bullet pointed. When I revised for mocks, I went over processes for bio using a whiteboard and seeing how much I could remember from memory. And I did A ****load of exam questions. Like they were my BFF and I had an A5 binder of them to do on the bus, free periods, lunch, and spare time during lessons if I had finished the task set by the teacher. (This is what I did for A-Level btw, I had nothing set for GCSE and I feel like although I did pretty well, I would’ve done better if I had used these techniques then). It’s a shame corona had to cancel everything because just when I had figured out what was right for me, exams were cancelled. Oh well.
this is really good advice!! i'm in year 12 and this is how i revise for my topic tests and exams - not exactly but it is VERY (almost scarily) close to this. cue cards are your best friend. when i started sixth form lots of people recommended making notes to me on a4 sheets of paper and i did do so at the start, but i found it absolutely useless. i knew i'd never look back on those sheets and they didn't help me retain anything. i'd recommend following this advice, it's helped me get amazing grades so far.
2
reply
SoulfulTwist
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 weeks ago
#6
Honestly, with difficulty.
1
reply
Physicsqueen
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
After you have learned/revised the content, I found past papers to be most effective.
1
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by chibichibi_xx)
I made all of my notes on flashcards and well in advance (even before the topic was taught) using teachers powerpoints, textbooks, revision guides and websites, and took them to the lesson so I could add anything the teacher would say to my notes. I added mark scheme points in red pen (such as 6-8 markers on biological processes). When we had a topic test, the night before I would make A4 summary sheets - I wouldn’t cram everything in because that’s a waste of time and I’m just rewriting my notes, but key bits (such as things I’d always forget) would be bullet pointed. When I revised for mocks, I went over processes for bio using a whiteboard and seeing how much I could remember from memory. And I did A ****load of exam questions. Like they were my BFF and I had an A5 binder of them to do on the bus, free periods, lunch, and spare time during lessons if I had finished the task set by the teacher. (This is what I did for A-Level btw, I had nothing set for GCSE and I feel like although I did pretty well, I would’ve done better if I had used these techniques then). It’s a shame corona had to cancel everything because just when I had figured out what was right for me, exams were cancelled. Oh well.
Thank you so much for your reply!! I know, it's so annoying that A-Levels were cancelled, but at least you worked hard during the year, so hopefully you will get good predicted grades! What are you going to study in the future? Good luck

*Sorry i forgot to add, what websites/resources did you use for A-Level Biology? I can't seem to find much online.
0
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by SashaNH)
I personally like to make mind maps and then look over them. I’ll then try to re create the mind map from my memory (usually on a whiteboard). Sometimes diagrams can work too! Sorry if this isn’t much help!
Thank you for your reply!! This was really helpful, I'm going to try make mind maps to learn key concepts.
0
reply
chibichibi_xx
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by Um,Bridge)
Thank you so much for your reply!! I know, it's so annoying that A-Levels were cancelled, but at least you worked hard during the year, so hopefully you will get good predicted grades! What are you going to study in the future? Good luck

*Sorry i forgot to add, what websites/resources did you use for A-Level Biology? I can't seem to find much online.
Pharmacy at Nottingham 🤞
I used seneca learning and snaprevise, but other than that I didn't use any other online resources. Just exam questions, textbook and teacher's powerpoints.
0
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by mnot)
I have found focused wrote learning & repetition.
I really think keeping your mind glued in can often be the most difficult bit (i think scheduled mini breaks & rewards can really help stop your mind from wondering)
Thank you!! Yes I agree, giving myself frequent breaks and rewards definitely helps me to stay focused. I will definitely be trying repetition as a technique!
0
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by qeachy)
this is really good advice!! i'm in year 12 and this is how i revise for my topic tests and exams - not exactly but it is VERY (almost scarily) close to this. cue cards are your best friend. when i started sixth form lots of people recommended making notes to me on a4 sheets of paper and i did do so at the start, but i found it absolutely useless. i knew i'd never look back on those sheets and they didn't help me retain anything. i'd recommend following this advice, it's helped me get amazing grades so far.
Thank you!! I will definitely be trying out flashcards as a new technique!
0
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by Physicsqueen)
After you have learned/revised the content, I found past papers to be most effective.
Definitely the most effective! I found it helps me with exam technique and finding what the examiner is really looking for!
0
reply
Cell_D
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 weeks ago
#14
I mix my revision up, read and then write. You always seem to think you are not taking an information in but you would be surprised how much you do.
1
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by SoulfulTwist)
Honestly, with difficulty.
😂😂
0
reply
GCSESUCK
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
This is like a really weird way but it works for me! I make power points of a whole topic and go over it and add questions and like the others said I would use past papers. I find it helpful, hope you do too!
1
reply
GCSESUCK
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by GCSESUCK)
This is like a really weird way but it works for me! I make power points of a whole topic and go over it and add questions and like the others said I would use past papers. I find it helpful, hope you do too!
Also I struggled like you as well
0
reply
Emily5243
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 weeks ago
#18
I used past papers a lot for GCSE and A level - and made sure to study the mark schemes to see exactly what the examiner wants. I would create mind maps summarising topics and I would try to write down everything I could remember about that topic and use the mind map to check.
I'm at uni now and I've found flashcards really helpful for me - I do medicine so it's very content heavy. I use anki and brainscape. They are online flashcard apps, you can get them on phones/tablets/laptops, you create flashcards by topic and just work through them. They work on the principle of spaced repetition which has been proven to be one of the best revision techniques (watch Ali Abdaal's youtube videos about this).
0
reply
Um,Bridge
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by GCSESUCK)
This is like a really weird way but it works for me! I make power points of a whole topic and go over it and add questions and like the others said I would use past papers. I find it helpful, hope you do too!
Omg I was actually going to do this but I wasn't sure if it would help me, or just be a waste of time - I will definitely be trying this method now as you found it helpful!
0
reply
schildkroten
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#20
Report 3 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by Um,Bridge)
😂😂
Have you tried out Seneca, honestly I'm not into flashcards as I'm too lazy to make them but Seneca has actually helped me so much I'm rlly grateful to them lol
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you finding researching unis for 2021 entry?

I have been able to get all the information I need from online research (83)
18.61%
I have tried virtual events and found them useful (90)
20.18%
I have tried virtual events and did not find them useful (84)
18.83%
I would be interested in trying socially distanced or scaled down in person events (97)
21.75%
I want to but don't know where to start with researching unis for 2021 entry (44)
9.87%
I haven't started researching yet (48)
10.76%

Watched Threads

View All