Revision help ASAP!

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Bookworm_88
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How do you actually revise for A-Levels, at GCSE I did a range of mindmaps, flashcards, cornell mehod
But the issues for me with each were:
Mindmaps- Don't look at them
Flashcards- Made way too many to make them effective and didn't look at them
Cornell method- Forgot to fill in each section

I'm doing Biology, Chemistry and English Language
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qeachy
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cue cards, blurting, and millions of exam questions.

those three methods have got me very far - i am top of my class in each of my subjects. as many people will say, different people learn in different ways but it's slightly different with revision - some methods are very limiting. mindmaps are good for certain topics, i think - not really to revise from but more for when you don't understand something. mind maps can add a lot more clarity to a topic than chunks of words in a textbook. i have a few mindmaps and diagrams on my bedroom wall, and i look at them every now and then (okay, very rarely, but it makes me feel better to have them there instead of the bin) to remind myself.

i don't think having lots of flashcards make them ineffective. i have a LOT of flashcards, on every single topic. what's making them ineffective may be the way you're making them. i know lots of people tend to put too much writing on one side of the flashcard, which can lead to you just not wanting to read through it all and making you reluctant to use the flashcards, or you possibly not recalling all of that information but assuming that you did because you skim read the paragraph. i'm sure if you look for it you'll find videos/articles on how to make effective flashcards - i promise you that they can change your life if done right! use one set every few months or so to improve your long term recall - its little efforts over a long period of time.

blurting is basically just grabbing a whiteboard or piece of paper and putting down everything that you can remember about a topic on there. i find it most effective the day before tests, after i've used my cue cards (and even done my exam questions). include definitions and diagrams when blurting. it helps, and it will also allow you to identify gaps in your knowledge that you can quickly brush up on the day before your exam.

lastly, exam questions. these are a MUST, especially with subjects like chemistry. mark schemes very often require you to phrase your answers in specific ways and include particular words - for example, i've seen them require 'between molecules' often when talking about intermolecular forces. i can tell you exactly how to answer a question about why X has a low/high melting/boiling point in order to get the marks, because i know what they are looking for as a result of the practise. these are very important because you can have the knowledge but miss out on easy marks because you aren't including what the mark scheme is looking far.

i do biology, chemistry and psychology - what i talked about above applies well to biology and chemistry, and so i assume physics as well. for english literature, your approach might be slightly different - for example, in psychology i focus a lot on application of knowledge and essay writing skills as well as the above. you will probably need to use something a lot different for english literature - someone else may have advice on that, but all i can tell you is to figure out what methods have worked for you so far and continue with them, and ditch whatever hasn't worked.

this has been my revision method since the beginning of year 11, and it's never once failed me. put in the effort and time, and you'll do amazing.
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Bookworm_88
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#3
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(Original post by qeachy)
cue cards, blurting, and millions of exam questions.

those three methods have got me very far - i am top of my class in each of my subjects. as many people will say, different people learn in different ways but it's slightly different with revision - some methods are very limiting. mindmaps are good for certain topics, i think - not really to revise from but more for when you don't understand something. mind maps can add a lot more clarity to a topic than chunks of words in a textbook. i have a few mindmaps and diagrams on my bedroom wall, and i look at them every now and then (okay, very rarely, but it makes me feel better to have them there instead of the bin) to remind myself.

i don't think having lots of flashcards make them ineffective. i have a LOT of flashcards, on every single topic. what's making them ineffective may be the way you're making them. i know lots of people tend to put too much writing on one side of the flashcard, which can lead to you just not wanting to read through it all and making you reluctant to use the flashcards, or you possibly not recalling all of that information but assuming that you did because you skim read the paragraph. i'm sure if you look for it you'll find videos/articles on how to make effective flashcards - i promise you that they can change your life if done right! use one set every few months or so to improve your long term recall - its little efforts over a long period of time.

blurting is basically just grabbing a whiteboard or piece of paper and putting down everything that you can remember about a topic on there. i find it most effective the day before tests, after i've used my cue cards (and even done my exam questions). include definitions and diagrams when blurting. it helps, and it will also allow you to identify gaps in your knowledge that you can quickly brush up on the day before your exam.

lastly, exam questions. these are a MUST, especially with subjects like chemistry. mark schemes very often require you to phrase your answers in specific ways and include particular words - for example, i've seen them require 'between molecules' often when talking about intermolecular forces. i can tell you exactly how to answer a question about why X has a low/high melting/boiling point in order to get the marks, because i know what they are looking for as a result of the practise. these are very important because you can have the knowledge but miss out on easy marks because you aren't including what the mark scheme is looking far.

i do biology, chemistry and psychology - what i talked about above applies well to biology and chemistry, and so i assume physics as well. for english literature, your approach might be slightly different - for example, in psychology i focus a lot on application of knowledge and essay writing skills as well as the above. you will probably need to use something a lot different for english literature - someone else may have advice on that, but all i can tell you is to figure out what methods have worked for you so far and continue with them, and ditch whatever hasn't worked.

this has been my revision method since the beginning of year 11, and it's never once failed me. put in the effort and time, and you'll do amazing.

"i look at them every now and then (okay, very rarely, but it makes me feel better to have them there instead of the bin) to remind myself" Same. LOL, that's so true!

Thank you for all of this. It's very much appreciated. By the end if felt like some sort of pysch evaluation about my study habits!
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qeachy
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(Original post by Bookworm_88)
"i look at them every now and then (okay, very rarely, but it makes me feel better to have them there instead of the bin) to remind myself" Same. LOL, that's so true!

Thank you for all of this. It's very much appreciated. By the end if felt like some sort of pysch evaluation about my study habits!
haha! i hope you find it helpful in the long run, good luck!!!
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