Zozozo12345
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Is it worth doing law a level if you want to become a lawyer? Or is it a waste of time?
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username5304322
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Not necessary. I'm pretty sure some law schools recommend students to study something else.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Zozozo12345)
Is it worth doing law a level if you want to become a lawyer? Or is it a waste of time?
It’s up to you, law schools don’t like it as a subject or dislike it
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giella
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Arguably a waste or time if you know you want to do law as you’re missing an opportunity to study something else that you’ll never be able to devote your time to. There is nothing in A level law that is actually essential and which won’t be repeated and covered in more depth in a law degree anyway.
However, law has a high drop out rate. Arguably doing the course at A level will allow you to test the subject out.
It’s ultimately up to you. Few universities would explicitly tell you not to do it. However, a few do and that’s worth investigating first.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by giella)
Arguably a waste or time if you know you want to do law as you’re missing an opportunity to study something else that you’ll never be able to devote your time to. There is nothing in A level law that is actually essential and which won’t be repeated and covered in more depth in a law degree anyway.
However, law has a high drop out rate. Arguably doing the course at A level will allow you to test the subject out.
It’s ultimately up to you. Few universities would explicitly tell you not to do it. However, a few do and that’s worth investigating first.
Which ones? I haven’t heard of any
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giella
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Which ones? I haven’t heard of any
Supposedly some top tier universities will blackball applications based on a candidate offering certain subjects. LSE used to and so did Cambridge.
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gtty123
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(Original post by giella)
Supposedly some top tier universities will blackball applications based on a candidate offering certain subjects. LSE used to and so did Cambridge.
Fair point. But, don't you think the fact that "[they] used to" is implying more of an acceptance towards the subject?

OP, I doubt you'd be "[wasting] time". My friend studied A level Law, and had got offers from 'top' tier universities.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by giella)
Supposedly some top tier universities will blackball applications based on a candidate offering certain subjects. LSE used to and so did Cambridge.
Law is no longer one of LSEs "non preferred" subjects - it was about 30 years ago but OP is appying now. Same with Cambridge

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/As...-processes.pdf
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giella
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http://repec.ioe.ac.uk/REPEc/pdf/qsswp1512.pdf

I would take a look at this. Law is still considered a less useful subject by many universities, even as recently as 2015.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by giella)
http://repec.ioe.ac.uk/REPEc/pdf/qsswp1512.pdf

I would take a look at this. Law is still considered a less useful subject by many universities, even as recently as 2015.
I can't be bothered to read through all that. The fact is if LSE didn't want people applying with Law A level they would clearly state it on their list of non preferred subjects along with things like Media Studies, but they don't.

I'm guessing that you heard Law is a non preferred subject from someone whose own knowledge was out of a date. I have done my best to reassure OP that Law is fine (unis would say if it wasn't).

Since you mention UCL, this is their list of acceptable A level subjects - far wider than LSEs and yes, they also include Law on it

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...level-subjects
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giella
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I can't be bothered to read through all that. The fact is if LSE didn't want people applying with Law A level they would clearly state it on their list of non preferred subjects along with things like Media Studies, but they don't.

I'm guessing that you heard Law is a non preferred subject from someone whose own knowledge was out of a date. I have done my best to reassure OP that Law is fine (unis would say if it wasn't).

Since you mention UCL, this is there list of their acceptable A level subjects - far wider than LSEs and yes, they also include Law on it

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...level-subjects
This is a report based on RG university preferences. I didn’t read through all that. I searched for law within it and it came up. I reported my finding. I wasn’t actually talking about LSE specifically in my previous post.

I’ve already given a pros and cons approach to deciding whether or not to do law. That document strengthens my point that some universities may still discriminate on the basis of a candidate offering law A level, particularly in a competitive application cycle. I would also argue that if you are considering law, getting work experience as opposed to doing law A level is likely to be considered better preparation for studying the subject at undergraduate level, especially if, like most people studying law, you have a view to undertake vocational training at the end.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by giella)
This is a report based on RG university preferences. I didn’t read through all that. I searched for law within it and it came up. I reported my finding. I wasn’t actually talking about LSE specifically in my previous post.

I’ve already given a pros and cons approach to deciding whether or not to do law. That document strengthens my point that some universities may still discriminate on the basis of a candidate offering law A level, particularly in a competitive application cycle. I would also argue that if you are considering law, getting work experience as opposed to doing law A level is likely to be considered better preparation for studying the subject at undergraduate level, especially if, like most people studying law, you have a view to undertake vocational training at the end.
I'm going to stop arguing this point with you now because no amount of evidence to the contrary will make you back down from your original assertion that "Few universities would explicitly tell you not to do it. However, a few do....." and then giving the examples of LSE & Cambridge
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giella
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I'm going to stop arguing this point with you now because no amount of evidence to the contrary will make you back down from your original assertion that "Few universities would explicitly tell you not to do it. However, a few do....." and then giving the examples of LSE & Cambridge
I said they used to. And I said it’s worth investigating which ones do.
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