Ignorance.opt
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#1
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#1
Hey everyone!! Hope everyone is safe and sound.

I just want to explore whether there are individuals, like myself , who are concerned about their habits, especially when it comes to studying and day to day activities. This topic specifically pertains to sleep hygiene.

I am a final year medic( about to be, transitioning from 4th to final), and have become increasingly suspicious of my perceived bad working habits. Throughout Med school, I have been pulling all nighters. Now this isn’t merely reflective of me being disorganised, but concerned about future repercussions of continuing this way of living. I don’t necessarily leave my work to the last minute, quite the contrary. I can function for 5 hours sleep a day. I just get easily swayed to reading articles, journals, watching podcasts etc. Although what is more striking, I have never slept a night before an exam. I mean NEVER! I just can’t, this hasn’t affected my grades one bit, and also my mental function. Although I am convinced that this work ethic is going to be detrimental, and would put huge pressure on me during finals. ( btw I tend to pull all nighters 3-4 months before exams, and it isn’t purely study related). I am just looking for tips and guidance to overcome this!

Thank you all in advance!
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Chris2892
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#2
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#2
I’ve just finished final year, with university on day release from full time work and assignment work/revising in my free time. Although our stress can be warranted to different things, I found myself with a similar work-life balance.

I used to try to do an intensive activity the day before my exam, like cycling. It tired me out for the night without taking up too much of my free time. I found it helped me sleep for exams. I also tried to go to bed earlier and wake up earlier so I could revise for the exam without having to sleep in between.
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seaholme
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Ignorance.opt)
I just can’t, this hasn’t affected my grades one bit, and also my mental function. Although I am convinced that this work ethic is going to be detrimental, and would put huge pressure on me during finals.
I guess the reason it's bad is because it would affect people's mental function, so if you're saying that it doesn't affect you one bit in that way, then I don't see why it's necessarily detrimental?

Personally I absolutely can't function without sleeping properly, but you're saying that you can.
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Es0phagus
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#4
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#4
If you're a great / top of the class student, then I don't see a problem. If you're a fairly average student, then it is probably affecting you unless you aren't aspiring for better / top top grades.

I sat one exam in Y1 without having slept (unintentionally) and narrowly failed it. My brain couldn't think straight. It seems you've somehow conditioned yourself otherwise. Although you have a few unhealthy habits, any huge changes you may make at this point may backfire if they've been key. I'd try to address some of the smaller/manageable stuff. If your desire to avoid sleep is not study-related, then seems like you need to treat yourself like a patient and apply some sleep hygiene advice.

I've never understood the concept of all-nighters as night time is not particularly productive – what takes me 1 hour to do during the day can take 2-3 hours if beyond a certain time of night.
Last edited by Es0phagus; 2 years ago
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Smile88egc
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#5
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#5
It's really important to optimise your sleep hygiene habits for when you qualify and start working as a doctor. You're not going to manage and perform at a good level when working a 70 hour week if you aren't getting decent sleep between shifts so I would try and crack this now if you can. Tired doctors make mistakes.
Read the book "Why we sleep" by Matthew Walker, it's enlightening!
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Catchetat
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#6
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#6
It depends how you are as a person. If you can function normal and feel well I don't see it as a problem. I like my 7-8 hour sleep so I must attempt some work during day time.

For me, I start with small steps, reading small parts of a chapter..........
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nexttime
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#7
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#7
My experience is that this kind of erratic sleep pattern is common during uni, and isn't necessarily a problem, but tends to die out pretty quick when you're working a regular shift. Maybe its age, maybe its that you're tired from the day, maybe its something else, I dunno. Doing an all nighter between days of lectures - common. Doing an all nighter between hospitals shifts - never seen it.
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