Niknak91
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This is a bit of a long one but would appreciate some help!

I work in Medical Aesthetics performing advanced skincare and laser treatments. Ideally, my aim is to secure a better future for myself with higher pay and the ability to do something less physical in later life. Also, I love studying, which is something I realised after college!

I would love to become a prescribing nurse but cant afford to go to uni and not work. I make fairly good money at the moment to then go back and live on student loans just wouldnt cover it. I want to study full time but still want to work part time in my current industry.
Ive applied to a few unis and waiting to hear back from a few of them but I have been given an unconditional offer to study BSc Pharmacology and Physiology. My idea is to study a Life science BSc then do further study to become a Nurse. This is what I need some advice on please!

I will either be doing BSc Pharmacology & physiology or BSc Biomedicine. I know that nurses are in demand and paid quite well in the Aesthetics Industry so im thinking of doing a PG Dip Nursing after my BSc.

Would I then need to do a v300 prescribing course after the PG Dip Nursing ?

Would I need to take a year out of Aesthetics to work in a hospital setting for a year before being accepted onto the v300? Or would working in Aesthetics count?
Thanks
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ForestCat
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(Original post by Niknak91)
This is a bit of a long one but would appreciate some help!

I work in Medical Aesthetics performing advanced skincare and laser treatments. Ideally, my aim is to secure a better future for myself with higher pay and the ability to do something less physical in later life. Also, I love studying, which is something I realised after college!

I would love to become a prescribing nurse but cant afford to go to uni and not work. I make fairly good money at the moment to then go back and live on student loans just wouldnt cover it. I want to study full time but still want to work part time in my current industry.
Ive applied to a few unis and waiting to hear back from a few of them but I have been given an unconditional offer to study BSc Pharmacology and Physiology. My idea is to study a Life science BSc then do further study to become a Nurse. This is what I need some advice on please!

I will either be doing BSc Pharmacology & physiology or BSc Biomedicine. I know that nurses are in demand and paid quite well in the Aesthetics Industry so im thinking of doing a PG Dip Nursing after my BSc.

Would I then need to do a v300 prescribing course after the PG Dip Nursing ?

Would I need to take a year out of Aesthetics to work in a hospital setting for a year before being accepted onto the v300? Or would working in Aesthetics count?
Thanks
What are you hoping to get out of doing a BSc first? From what I can tell all it would do is add on a lot of time and debt on to your journey? It wouldn't hugely shorten your nurse training.

If you did nursing straight away you would be eligible for the £5000 a year bursary plus student loans. You could then supplement your income doing HCA shifts, or when you're not on placement you may still be able to go back to your old job but you likely wouldn't be able to keep fixed hours.

I'm not current on the current requirements but you would likely have to work as a nurse for a period before being able to do your non medical prescribing.
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moosec
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As forestcat says, that seems a very long-winded way to go about it lol. If you want to become a nurse, there isn’t really much point in doing a different degree (speaking from my experience... I did another degree before nursing and it’s done me no favours whatsoever... just left me with two student loans to pay off🤪).
Nursing degrees cover Anatomy & Physiology and Pharmacology anyway, more so now than ever before... the nursing programmes have changed from 2019 onwards to include more pharmacology content, to better prepare student nurses to become Prescribers once qualified. Under the new programmes, I’m pretty sure nurses can go on to do the V300 course a lot sooner than on the previous programmes.

Finance wise: Nursing, Midwifery & Allied Health Professions courses from September 2020 will receive a £5,000 per year grant for living costs. This is on top of your Student Finance tuition fee loans (paid to the uni to cover the £9250 a year fee) and maintenance loans (paid to you for living costs.)
So for example, even if you only received the minimum student loan of £3,410 a year (most people receive more), you’d also get £5,000 a year on top of that (and unlike student loans, you don’t need to pay that £5000 a year back)... That means that even on the minimum student loan you’d still be getting £8,410 a year (but there’s a student finance calculator to give you a personalised estimate of how much you’d get for your student loan)
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Niknak91
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(Original post by moosec)
As forestcat says, that seems a very long-winded way to go about it lol. If you want to become a nurse, there isn’t really much point in doing a different degree (speaking from my experience... I did another degree before nursing and it’s done me no favours whatsoever... just left me with two student loans to pay off🤪).
Nursing degrees cover Anatomy & Physiology and Pharmacology anyway, more so now than ever before... the nursing programmes have changed from 2019 onwards to include more pharmacology content, to better prepare student nurses to become Prescribers once qualified. Under the new programmes, I’m pretty sure nurses can go on to do the V300 course a lot sooner than on the previous programmes.

Finance wise: Nursing, Midwifery & Allied Health Professions courses from September 2020 will receive a £5,000 per year grant for living costs. This is on top of your Student Finance tuition fee loans (paid to the uni to cover the £9250 a year fee) and maintenance loans (paid to you for living costs.)
So for example, even if you only received the minimum student loan of £3,410 a year (most people receive more), you’d also get £5,000 a year on top of that (and unlike student loans, you don’t need to pay that £5000 a year back)... That means that even on the minimum student loan you’d still be getting £8,410 year (but there’s a student finance calculator to give you a personalised estimate of how much you’d get for your student loan)
Thanks for your detailed reply!

I know it is very long winded!

The reason I chose this way though was because I dont have the qualifications to get onto the nursing course, but I did get onto the Foundation year for Pharmacology and Physiology. I would like to train at a masters or PG Dip level anyway so thought this may be a good idea. I'm not sure that I want to stop working altogether and nursing will definately require me to do that. Also the loan and maintenance grant wouldnt cover my living costs so I dont think it would work for me unfortunately!

Do you know if a PG Dip course will give credit for previous study? I'm wondering if I would still have to do the whole course after studying pharmacology? I dont mind doing it but if I had the option to shorten and qualify sooner I would.

As for student finance, It's all very confusing but you cleared it up well. Thank you!
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moosec
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Have you looked into doing the Access to Nursing Course? It's an Access to Higher Education Diploma that would give you the qualifications to get onto a nursing degree. It's a lot cheaper than doing an undergraduate degree just to be able to do your nursing degree... i think it's like £6k but it gets covered by an Advanced Learner Loan which is written off if you complete a degree afterwards, so if you went to uni after doing it you'd never have to pay it back It's studied at college, so it would probably let you work-part time alongside that as well, and would allow you to do the 3 year course, then if you wanted to do a masters you could specialise even further to become a Nurse Practitioner/ Aesthetic Nurse Practitioner and such. I don't know your personal circumstances of course, just trying to think of alternative ways for you which may save time & money - feel free to disregard if it's no use to you

In terms of working, honestly regardless of whether you do a BSc or an MSc/PGDip it's very difficult to juggle a normal part-time job alongside it. Nursing requires a specific amount of theory & placement hours in order to qualify (2,300hours of each.) So when you're out on placement, it'll be 37.5hrs a week for anywhere between 4-12 weeks, and you'll have placements multiple times a year. When out on placement you'll work the entire shift system so it'll include 12hr shifts, days, nights, weekends. Most student nurses will join the Bank as a HCA, as it offers flexible shifts that you can fit in around your own timetable. Maybe discuss with your current employer as to whether they're happy to put you on flexible shifts, or if they're okay for you to just drop off the radar every few months whilst you go out on placement... flexibility is the key thing you want to be looking out for when it comes to part-time jobs for student nurses

I don't think the PGDip course would offer that - it's already the 'shortened' 2 year option aimed for those who already have a degree, so I think the APL (accreditation of prior learning) goes towards entry to the course rather than shortening the course further. Best to check with the uni in question though
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Vam1970
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As others have said before that’s a very long winded way to get were you want to get.
I would definitely recommend an access course , using a loan. That way you can still work.
You could then apply for HCA and get a nursing apprenticeship so you would get paid whilst training. The pay is very good for apprentice nurse compared to other apprenticeships.
That’s 4 years.
The degree is quicker and loan plus grant is pretty good generally.
Then you would need to do prescribing which can be paid for by work or self funded. You would need to work alongside a doctor in GP or out of hours to get practice hours needed.
I am not sure if you could be assessed at the clinic, maybe??
A few Msc Level nursing courses don’t require practice hours , however most require 600 ish hours as HCA prior to starting.
These result in pgdip qualification rather than MSc.
I would recommend chatting to admissions.
Last edited by Vam1970; 6 months ago
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