The-judge-16
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In particular, I was looking at the Bsc radiography (radiotherapy and oncology) at City University of London. It would be much appreciated if I could hear from students who are currently studying radiography. Also what are the job prospects like with this degree?

Many thanks,
The-judge-16
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The-judge-16
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Anyone?
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Nannonorange
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Job prospects are good. There’s a shortage of both types of radiographers. The pay is relatively decent but considering the shifts you have to work and the hours you spend constantly on your feet it’s not so great and you can often progress but what has really upset me is that to do any postgrad in Radiography you have to apply for a job and get it with a hospital that will train you. So, you can’t just go on to do a postgraduate qualification immediately after completing your first degree which is extremely frustrating and had I known this before I started my degree I don’t honestly know if I would have even considered this degree.If you like dealing with people, looking at and taking xrays/ scanning or working in a hospital environment then it could be for you.
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Fermion.
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
In particular, I was looking at the Bsc radiography (radiotherapy and oncology) at City University of London. It would be much appreciated if I could hear from students who are currently studying radiography. Also what are the job prospects like with this degree?

Many thanks,
The-judge-16
I’m a radiographer and happy to answer any questions you have. Job prospects are great - you are almost guaranteed a job. If you do Diagnostic you have good scope for progression into other fields (CT, MRI, ultrasound). It’s rewarding and fun - and yes you are on your feet all day and do long hours but that’s expected with any NHS job.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by Fermion.)
I’m a radiographer and happy to answer any questions you have. Job prospects are great - you are almost guaranteed a job. If you do Diagnostic you have good scope for progression into other fields (CT, MRI, ultrasound). It’s rewarding and fun - and yes you are on your feet all day and do long hours but that’s expected with any NHS job.
Hi Fermion.

Many thanks for your reply!

That sounds promising, I was wondering whether therapeutic is better than diagnostic though, in terms of salary?
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Fermion.
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
Hi Fermion.

Many thanks for your reply!

That sounds promising, I was wondering whether therapeutic is better than diagnostic though, in terms of salary?
Both are the same in salary as you work for the NHS which has their own pay system. You will start off as a band 5 and you will have the opportunity to work up the band ladder to band 6, 7, 8 etc. So at the end of the day it’s what you have the most interest in: diagnostics is more on the go and can be quite hectic with long hours whilst therapeutic is more of a 9-5. I personally liked the different modalities of diagnostic more.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by Nannonorange)
Job prospects are good. There’s a shortage of both types of radiographers. The pay is relatively decent but considering the shifts you have to work and the hours you spend constantly on your feet it’s not so great and you can often progress but what has really upset me is that to do any postgrad in Radiography you have to apply for a job and get it with a hospital that will train you. So, you can’t just go on to do a postgraduate qualification immediately after completing your first degree which is extremely frustrating and had I known this before I started my degree I don’t honestly know if I would have even considered this degree.If you like dealing with people, looking at and taking xrays/ scanning or working in a hospital environment then it could be for you.
Thank you for your reply!

Sorry to hear that your upset about postgrad radiography. I too would like to pursue a postgraduate level degree.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by Fermion.)
Both are the same in salary as you work for the NHS which has their own pay system. You will start off as a band 5 and you will have the opportunity to work up the band ladder to band 6, 7, 8 etc. So at the end of the day it’s what you have the most interest in: diagnostics is more on the go and can be quite hectic with long hours whilst therapeutic is more of a 9-5. I personally liked the different modalities of diagnostic more.
I do like the look of therapeutic radiography, as oncology is studied in this type of degree (which I’m really interested in).One question for you though, what do you study the most in a diagnostic Radiography degree for example diseases etc.

Many thanks
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
In particular, I was looking at the Bsc radiography (radiotherapy and oncology) at City University of London. It would be much appreciated if I could hear from students who are currently studying radiography. Also what are the job prospects like with this degree?

Many thanks,
The-judge-16
Given recent pandemic events and speaking as someone who works for the NHS, you cannot go wrong by doing this. I have been astonished by how valued we are.... it won't last. But seriously the skills you will learn will enable you to work allover the world and unless you kill someone you will have a job for life. My day job is oncology and the radiology guys are amazing, The skill they have never ceases to amaze me. GO for it
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Given recent pandemic events and speaking as someone who works for the NHS, you cannot go wrong by doing this. I have been astonished by how valued we are.... it won't last. But seriously the skills you will learn will enable you to work allover the world and unless you kill someone you will have a job for life. My day job is oncology and the radiology guys are amazing, The skill they have never ceases to amaze me. GO for it
Many thanks.

This sounds very promising, would you say therapeutic is better than diagnostic then?
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
Many thanks.

This sounds very promising, would you say therapeutic is better than diagnostic then?
No idea there - but I am guessing that therapeutic is more rewarding as you are curing people, but diagnosic is astonishing as you are telling people what is wrong.....
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
No idea there - but I am guessing that therapeutic is more rewarding as you are curing people, but diagnosic is astonishing as you are telling people what is wrong.....
That’s true, I’ll have to do some research online.
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-Eirlys-
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
In particular, I was looking at the Bsc radiography (radiotherapy and oncology) at City University of London. It would be much appreciated if I could hear from students who are currently studying radiography. Also what are the job prospects like with this degree?

Many thanks,
The-judge-16
From what I saw when I looked into this degree, it is primarily done for the sole career of becoming a radiographer, like that of a nursing degree leading to a nursing career. It would be difficult for it to apply to other careers imo. If you want to become a radiographer, then it's perfect!
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Fermion.
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
I do like the look of therapeutic radiography, as oncology is studied in this type of degree (which I’m really interested in).One question for you though, what do you study the most in a diagnostic Radiography degree for example diseases etc.

Many thanks
I can explain what you will learn at uni as a diagnostics student.

In first year we study positioning of patient's and how to x-ray different body parts of patients. We also learn a great deal of physics in terms of equipment and how this relates to patient safety and radiation as well as radiation dose management. First year mainly covers the different types of fractures and appearances of dislocations etc. You will also cover a range of bony pathologies: osteoporosis, osteoarthitis, spinal pathologies (spondylolisthesis), as well as chest pathology.

Second year expands on this and we learn how to position patients during trauma situations. It is important to be able to modify your technique of positioning if the patient cannot move or has a confirmed fracture. We also look into contrast studies and the different types of contrasts available. You learn the different types of medications and pharmacological agents you can provide for the patient when their undergoing contrast examinations. You cover the different types of contrast studies - gallbladder, pancreas, urinary, gastrointestinal, reproductive. You learn the vast array of pathologies and diseases that are associated with the aforementioned examinations and what they look like on an x-ray. You also delve into other modalities such as CT (particularly of the head) and the different types of head pathologies: aneurysms, different types of haemorrhages, different types of stroke appearances. You will build up on your knowledge of first year by learning the physics and mechanisms of other machines such as CT and digital vs computed radiography. Second year is the hardest with the amount of information and practical aspects you need to learn.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by Fermion.)
I can explain what you will learn at uni as a diagnostics student.

In first year we study positioning of patient's and how to x-ray different body parts of patients. We also learn a great deal of physics in terms of equipment and how this relates to patient safety and radiation as well as radiation dose management. First year mainly covers the different types of fractures and appearances of dislocations etc. You will also cover a range of bony pathologies: osteoporosis, osteoarthitis, spinal pathologies (spondylolisthesis), as well as chest pathology.

Second year expands on this and we learn how to position patients during trauma situations. It is important to be able to modify your technique of positioning if the patient cannot move or has a confirmed fracture. We also look into contrast studies and the different types of contrasts available. You learn the different types of medications and pharmacological agents you can provide for the patient when their undergoing contrast examinations. You cover the different types of contrast studies - gallbladder, pancreas, urinary, gastrointestinal, reproductive. You learn the vast array of pathologies and diseases that are associated with the aforementioned examinations and what they look like on an x-ray. You also delve into other modalities such as CT (particularly of the head) and the different types of head pathologies: aneurysms, different types of haemorrhages, different types of stroke appearances. You will build up on your knowledge of first year by learning the physics and mechanisms of other machines such as CT and digital vs computed radiography. Second year is the hardest with the amount of information and practical aspects you need to learn.
Thank you so much for all your advice! You have truly helped me.
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Fermion.
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
Thank you so much for all your advice! You have truly helped me.
No problem! Good luck and I’m always around for further help.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by Fermion.)
No problem! Good luck and I’m always around for further help.
PRSOM
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I101
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Hiya,
I am a 2nd year Therapeutic Radiography and Oncology student at City University of London. I got into radiography by default. I initially applied for Optom, and on results day was unsuccessful so went it RT & Oncology, which was my second option.
I really enjoy my degree, it combines aspects of patient care, with physics and biology particularly in the Oncology side of it. Initially I was quite reluctant, you hear people say things like “radiographers are button pushers” ect but if there’s anything we’ve seen with the pandemic is the heroic HCPs including diagnostic radiographers being on the frontline, and equally the therapeutics who continued to treat cancer patients because cancer doesn’t pause for a pandemic!
The lecturers are so helpful, and we have access to some of the best RT hospitals for placement including St Barts, Queens, UCLH.
As for job opportunities, there is a long term shortage of radiographers, and incase you didn’t know, the NHS is giving ALL radiography student between a bursary of £6-8K based on your personal situations. (This applies to other courses struggling to recruit ie nursing)
Diagnostic and therapeutic radiography are both equally challenging but rewarding. Remember you will be a part of a cancer patients journey, seeing them everyday for many weeks, so it requires a certain amount of emotional strength. I’ve learnt to see it as we can only do so much to save a life, death is sadly inevitable, but it’s about being the best healthcare professional for someone in their toughest times.
Let me know if you have any questions
Last edited by I101; 3 months ago
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Hopefuls
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I’m from a Diagnostic radiography background, can’t speak on radiotherapy. It’s a good career, if it’s only radiography and radiography related things you want to do as a career. I feel that it doesn’t give you the flexibility to pivot into anything else like OT Physio Speech therapy, Nursing etc provides so in a sense it’s one of the most restrictive healthcare professions as you can only really work in a radiology department and nowhere else. In this day and age I think it’s nice to have a healthcare career that gives you options in terms of role and work environment. So it’s great if radiography is all you want to do, but just be aware of the limitations of something so niche. This is just my opinion though so don’t let me put you off.
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Pandalovesfood
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(Original post by Fermion.)
I can explain what you will learn at uni as a diagnostics student.

In first year we study positioning of patient's and how to x-ray different body parts of patients. We also learn a great deal of physics in terms of equipment and how this relates to patient safety and radiation as well as radiation dose management. First year mainly covers the different types of fractures and appearances of dislocations etc. You will also cover a range of bony pathologies: osteoporosis, osteoarthitis, spinal pathologies (spondylolisthesis), as well as chest pathology.

Second year expands on this and we learn how to position patients during trauma situations. It is important to be able to modify your technique of positioning if the patient cannot move or has a confirmed fracture. We also look into contrast studies and the different types of contrasts available. You learn the different types of medications and pharmacological agents you can provide for the patient when their undergoing contrast examinations. You cover the different types of contrast studies - gallbladder, pancreas, urinary, gastrointestinal, reproductive. You learn the vast array of pathologies and diseases that are associated with the aforementioned examinations and what they look like on an x-ray. You also delve into other modalities such as CT (particularly of the head) and the different types of head pathologies: aneurysms, different types of haemorrhages, different types of stroke appearances. You will build up on your knowledge of first year by learning the physics and mechanisms of other machines such as CT and digital vs computed radiography. Second year is the hardest with the amount of information and practical aspects you need to learn.
Hi! I was wondering if you could help me out. I'm going to be choosing my A-levels this year, and at the moment I have decided Applied Science, Sociology and Psychology. Are my choices good enough to do radiotherapy? Also, I wanted to know if radiotherapy is mainly math based as I'm a bit weak in math and I wanted to know if there is anything I should go over while I'm going to do my A-levels, anything I should go over or maybe practice to make the transition a bit easier. I also wanted to know whether I could choose Applied Science and Sociology with a random A-level, or should I stick to a science subject like Psychology? Would it look weird or unappealing if I could a 3rd random A-level that doesn't suit with radiotherapy? Sorry for all the questions.
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