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    Are they not worth it as they are expensive, or valuable because you extend your knowledge in that field of study:
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    Masters would probably help improve your job prospects however it can be quite costly for example, accomodation and tuition fees would add up to roughly £12,000 alone.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    It's quite an individual thing really also depends what type of masters...undergraduate masters like mine doesn't cost any more than an extra BSc year. If you are talking about postgrad masters, there is the ability to acquire funding and so in some cases it won't cost you at all. In terms or is it worth doing, my masters is accredited whilst the BSc isn't, so it's important if I want to work as a scientist in my career...
    What do you mean by funding, like money from the Government?
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    Scholarships, sponsorships, career advancement loans, etc etc
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    Essentially yes, through a research council providing you have a good enough grade for your first degree (this only applies for research masters not taught ones)
    Applies for taught MAs too. You still need a very good grade, decent refs, a decent proposal that's liked etc and all the luck in the world to even have half a chance though.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    Thanks I didn't know that...I guess it was a poor assumption that the research councils were only concerned with research orientated courses...
    Think they have to provide a certain criteria to do with researching of the particular subject. But you can apply for research council funding for say an MA in 19th cen literature as a taught course.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Are they not worth it as they are expensive, or valuable because you extend your knowledge in that field of study:
    That depends entirely on what you're hoping to do with your masters degree. If you're hoping to continue on to a PhD, a masters can sometimes be crucial - valuable certainly, but closer to necessity.
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    (Original post by MrShifty)
    That depends entirely on what you're hoping to do with your masters degree. If you're hoping to continue on to a PhD, a masters can sometimes be crucial - valuable certainly, but closer to necessity.
    What if you just did a MSc in Econometrics or something for a year? Would it be worth it?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    What if you just did a MSc in Econometrics or something for a year? Would it be worth it?
    Depends on the person. It's all about whether you think it's worth it!!
    You can't just ask someone 'Is it worth it???'.. because one person's response will differ to another person's response..

    One person may want to improve his job prospects...
    Another might want to continue on into a phd...
    Another might think it's a bloody waste of time...
    Another might be doing it so that he/she can stay on at uni for one more year before going into work..thus prolonging their stay at university

    All kinds of responses...

    Why would you want to do a masters then?? do you want to do a phd? do you want to improve your job prospects and gain the edge over other students who just have a degree?? do you just have £15,000 to spare??

    Nobody can tell you if the masters you want to do is worth it because it is all up that person to decide whether or not it's worth it!!!
    Have a serious think about it buddy and if you think it's worth it then it most definitely would be then wouldn't it?

    I can't just say to you 'oh it's worth it because it improves your job prospects' in which case it might differ to your own belief and how would that benefit you eh??

    Think about it mate.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    But what would you be looking to do with a MSc in econometrics afterwards? I know two people who did an MSc in economics (not sure what they did exactly), one became an accountant the other is looking to do a PhD.
    A job.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    A job.
    what year are you in uni at the moment?
    i myself didn't start thinking and looking into it until my second year.
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    Maybe it would be a better idea to concentrate on your AS levels, to be honest.
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    lol.. mate, i think you best concentrate on getting into university first before looking into postgraduate.
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    (Original post by IcEmAn911)
    what year are you in uni at the moment?
    :rofl:

    (sorry.)
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    (Original post by tommm)
    :rofl:

    (sorry.)
    sorry i just assumed he is in uni the people i tend to come across don't start thinking about postgrad until either they're in year 2 or year 3.. or better yet, end of year 3.
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    (Original post by IcEmAn911)
    what year are you in uni at the moment?
    i myself didn't start thinking and looking into it until my second year.
    This may sound wierd, but I'm not at uni yet.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    This may sound wierd, but I'm not at uni yet.
    then why don't you concentrate on doing your a levels and getting into uni first before thinking about moving on into postgrad?
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    Please don't feed this perpetual troll, guys. :p:
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    Well there's certainly no harm in thinking about it at the stage you're at, and if you were certain you wanted to go on to do postgraduate studies it could even help provide something to aim for.

    However, whether an MSc is for you is a question that can only be answered during the course of your degree. You may find that you enjoy academia and your subject so much that you'd love to do a masters. Conversely, you may find that by your second or third year you've had your fill and simply can't wait to get out in the real world and make a start on your career. This is important because you may be determined to do an MSc because you think it'll enhance your job prospects, but if your heart's not in it there's a danger you'll end up regarding the extra year as a tiresome burden, which could have an adverse effect on your performance.

    Perhaps the best information we can give is an insight into what an MSc is. Most importantly, it isn't simply an extra year of uni: The topics you'll cover will typically be more advanced, and there'll be a much greater emphasis on independent learning (in the form of a large dissertation on a topic of your choice, which you write up during the summer vacation). Instead of passively taking in lectures and demonstrating your knowledge at an exam, you'll be expected to really get into your subject and show a good level of understanding.

    As for job prospects, I have no idea - I'm a ne'erdowell hoping to flee the real world and spend my entire life in academia until such a point where everyday things like socks and lampshades strike me as confusing and exotic. From what I've heard a masters can help single out your application from that of other graduates, but I've nown plenty of people who've been able to get good jobs with just an undergraduate degree.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    This may sound wierd, but I'm not at uni yet.
    Then stop thinking about Masters degrees.
 
 
 

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