Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    OP hasn't even started his AS levels yet :rofl: Has he even done his GCSEs?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    No good points. Bad points are that it is a complete waste of one's time, costs a lot, will not get you further in life at all.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MJ84)
    No good points. Bad points are that it is a complete waste of one's time, costs a lot, will not get you further in life at all.
    Great posting champ.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by MJ84)
    No good points. Bad points are that it is a complete waste of one's time, costs a lot, will not get you further in life at all.
    That's probably true. You know, I think work experience is probably more valuable than a Master's. But then again, if they are no good point, why are there so many people doing postgraduate degrees here in Britain?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    That's probably true. You know, I think work experience is probably more valuable than a Master's. But then again, if they are no good point, why are there so many people doing postgraduate degrees here in Britain?
    Maybe because they are TRULY interested in their subject? They would like to study more?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Well that question's easy to answer: because we're super awesome. Humanity at the pinnacle of its evolution, even.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tomber)
    Then stop thinking about Masters degrees.
    People consider their desired profession before they get to university. Why shouldn't they consider the intervening steps too?

    The decision of whether or not to do a Masters could conceivably affect your chosen pool of universities and courses, in which case it may well also affect your A Level choices.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Arnie Pie In The Sky)
    Maybe because they are TRULY interested in their subject? They would like to study more?
    Don't be ridiculous, whoever heard of people actually pursuing degrees for intellectual interest anymore! Everything has got to have quantifiable financial merit for it to be worth doing. :rolleyes:


    :no:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tomber)
    Don't be ridiculous, whoever heard of people actually pursuing degrees for intellectual interest anymore! Everything has got to have quantifiable financial merit for it to be worth doing. :rolleyes:


    :no:
    Hasn't it always been that way though? The very first universities in Great Britain were largely vocational institutions, whilst every expansion of higher education since then has been initiated with an aim to meeting the growing demands of industry and commerce. In each case, most people entering university did so for the status and material rewards available thanks to the better career options.

    I'm willing to bet that those who pursue a degree solely for the intellectual rewards have always been in a tiny minority. I can't really criticise people who view university purely in terms of the career opportunities it opens up: they, after all, are simply using the education system precisely as it was intended to be used. The idea of higher education as an intellectual pursuit is, at least in my view, less a reflection of its true nature and more a euphemistic throwback to the old notion that to be overly concerned with matters financial was crass and indicative of a lack of class.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Hasn't it always been that way though? The very first universities in Great Britain were largely vocational institutions, whilst every expansion of higher education since then has been initiated with an aim to meeting the growing demands of industry and commerce. In each case, most people entering university did so for the status and material rewards available thanks to the better career options.

    I'm willing to bet that those who pursue a degree solely for the intellectual rewards have always been in a tiny minority. I can't really criticise people who view university purely in terms of the career opportunities it opens up: they, after all, are simply using the education system precisely as it was intended to be used. The idea of higher education as an intellectual pursuit is, at least in my view, less a reflection of its true nature and more a euphemistic throwback to the old notion that to be overly concerned with matters financial was crass and indicative of a lack of class

    Shifty, I think Tomber had a touch of sarcasm in his post
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by apotoftea)
    Shifty, I think Tomber had a touch of sarcasm in his post
    Stop spoiling my fun. What's the point in being a postgrad if I can't be pompous and po-faced whenever I like?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Stop spoiling my fun. What's the point in being a postgrad if I can't be pompous and po-faced whenever I like?
    That is a VERY good point Oopps I mean :mad: :mad:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Hasn't it always been that way though? The very first universities in Great Britain were largely vocational institutions, whilst every expansion of higher education since then has been initiated with an aim to meeting the growing demands of industry and commerce.
    As far as I was aware, the first universities sprung up, in a similar manner to professional musicians, through the patronage of monarchs and noblemen. This would very much be in the spirit of learning for learning's sake.

    If you could cite a particular institution amongst the early universities which was founded with a vocational purpose I'd be interested to see it (seriously).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Sorry I can't give a particular example, that was just my general impression - that they were founded with the initial intention of training the professional clergy, physicians, scholars of law and administrators (and the creation of an educated subsection of the workforce in general).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Sorry I can't give a particular example, that was just my general impression - that they were founded with the initial intention of training the professional clergy, physicians, scholars of law and administrators (and the creation of an educated subsection of the workforce in general).
    You are quite right, many of them were founded with those purposes in mind and served to train competent professionals and clergy. At the same time though, other (extremely wealthy) people educated their children both privately and at universities either because they valued learning or because it was expected of the predominantly upper classes of their age. Both of these factors (among others) help explain church, royal, and aristocratic patronage of universities over the span of their existence. Much like now, universities have always been flexible creatures capable of catering to the interests of the: (1) aspiring professionals, (2) developing scholars and (3) those with cash to fund it all!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Actually the modern research university is a product of the late 19th century so the idea of pursuing something for purely academic merits if you aren't a member of the landed gentry is a fairly modern invention.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Good: If you want to get into something specifically related to your field, another year of being a student.
    Bad: Not very good socially, cost a lot.
 
 
 

University open days

  • Southampton Solent University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Sun, 18 Nov '18
  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.