Why do people go to the gym between 16-22 to build muscle ?

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lhh2003
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Firstly, if you do this everyday for 3 years and do not train at all for a month, then you lose a huge amount of MANY hours worth of training and hard work .. that's like me running everyday for a month and a bit , and then missing a single day, and seeing all of my hardworking go to nothing.

In this time, you could learn a skill that wont just vanish when you get older, and that can make you money.

Now, I am NOT saying that you should be unhealthy. I.e I am not saying that you should miss gym to be lazy and eat unhealthy, but there are easier alternatives, like running which you can do anywhere to stay fit, or even yoga. Neither of these require huge amounts of money to be splashed on things like protein powders , equipment/memberships, travel expenses to get to the gym, or the diets you have to subject yourselves to of eating nothing but naked chicken 6 times a week every lunch and dinner.

I get that the gains people make can make them feel more confident, but then I ask the question who are you trying to look good for ? At this age, you're not really going to be looking out for a partner or looking good for business meetings, you'll probably be doing mostly independent work where you can sit in a tracky without any need to look sharp. You might get a one night stand here and there if you do look good, but why not focus on sharpening yourself to the best of your abilities mentally, dedicate all of your time to becoming the Arnold of the mental world, using the time to develop hard skills ? You may look like not as good as if you went to the gym ate this point in time, but you can focus on the gym when it's actually important to look good aesthetically.

P.S this isn't asked at people who go to the gym to lose weight as a form of exercise but rather just a curious question for people who go to the gym to get ripped. I also rate your dedication if you are someone who does go to the gym for either purposes.
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Nutritionist
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Well, there’s quite a lot of misinformed assumptions made in this post. I’ll go through them in the order you’ve stated.

1. It is not true that you’ll lose all your hard work after a month off. If you’ve truly built up a solid base of muscle mass and worked hard for 3 years then taking a month off isn’t the end of the world. Yes, you’ll lose some muscle, but as much as you’re making out. Muscle memory also exists, so when you resume training again you’ll find that the muscle you lost will be put on much faster this time than when you initially put it on. I would expect about 2 months back training to get back where you were prior to the break.

2. Saying there are “easier alternatives” is a pretty narrow minded statement. There are “easier alternatives” to doing anything in life so why don’t we all just sit and do nothing? We do it because we enjoy it. I’ve spent time as a runner, and I can tell you I love the gym infinitely more. It’s also completely untrue to say that huge amounts of money have to be spent on protein powders and memberships. Firstly, protein powders are a supplement and not a necessity. Secondly, a gym membership at a commercial gym costs about £15/month. A good pair of running shoes costs hundreds. As far as eating goes, I agree subjecting yourself to chicken breast 6 times a week sounds awful. Fortunately though, this is not the case in any way, shape or form. I can eat a lot more now that I have more muscle mass than I could before I started going to the gym. I eat ~4,000 calories a day and as long as I hit my protein target (very rarely need protein powder to do so) I can eat pretty much anything else I like, within reason.

3. Please get it out of your head that the sole reason people go to the gym is to impress others. I’d argue most gym goers do this for themselves. I for one know that I’d still go if I never saw another human again. Also, who says you can’t sharpen mental abilities through the gym? I started training six years ago and now it’s led to a university degree and lifetime career choice.

Based on your post I don’t believe you’ve ever properly invested your time/effort in training at the gym. I think if you did you’d start to see how wrong some of your assumptions are.
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Xarao
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Easier alternatives? If you want the easy route, go ahead and do so. But don't force the same thinking of yours to others because we need less people like you. Also, you clearly have no knowledge on the matter, so please refrain from making such topics in the future.

Also, running is not the same as lifting weights just in case your underdeveloped mind can't understand that.
Last edited by Xarao; 3 weeks ago
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Theloniouss
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It's not just about what's easiest, it's about what you enjoy. If you prefer the gym over running (like most sensible people), it doesn't make sense to go running.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
Well, there’s quite a lot of misinformed assumptions made in this post. I’ll go through them in the order you’ve stated.

1. It is not true that you’ll lose all your hard work after a month off. If you’ve truly built up a solid base of muscle mass and worked hard for 3 years then taking a month off isn’t the end of the world. Yes, you’ll lose some muscle, but as much as you’re making out. Muscle memory also exists, so when you resume training again you’ll find that the muscle you lost will be put on much faster this time than when you initially put it on. I would expect about 2 months back training to get back where you were prior to the break.

2. Saying there are “easier alternatives” is a pretty narrow minded statement. There are “easier alternatives” to doing anything in life so why don’t we all just sit and do nothing? We do it because we enjoy it. I’ve spent time as a runner, and I can tell you I love the gym infinitely more. It’s also completely untrue to say that huge amounts of money have to be spent on protein powders and memberships. Firstly, protein powders are a supplement and not a necessity. Secondly, a gym membership at a commercial gym costs about £15/month. A good pair of running shoes costs hundreds. As far as eating goes, I agree subjecting yourself to chicken breast 6 times a week sounds awful. Fortunately though, this is not the case in any way, shape or form. I can eat a lot more now that I have more muscle mass than I could before I started going to the gym. I eat ~4,000 calories a day and as long as I hit my protein target (very rarely need protein powder to do so) I can eat pretty much anything else I like, within reason.

3. Please get it out of your head that the sole reason people go to the gym is to impress others. I’d argue most gym goers do this for themselves. I for one know that I’d still go if I never saw another human again. Also, who says you can’t sharpen mental abilities through the gym? I started training six years ago and now it’s led to a university degree and lifetime career choice.

Based on your post I don’t believe you’ve ever properly invested your time/effort in training at the gym. I think if you did you’d start to see how wrong some of your assumptions are.
Obviously Im not saying going to the gym is bad, in fact it can be a good stress reliever, but so are activities like push ups / running / palates , which doesn't require the much more rigorous lifestyle for effectively the same results; the only difference being one makes you muscular (the other activities can help you lose weight) at a much bigger cost, in a time when nobody is gonna see you with your clothes off.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Xarao)
Easier alternatives? If you want the easy route, go ahead and do so. But don't force the same thinking of yours to others because we need less trash people like you. Also, you clearly have no knowledge on the matter, so please refrain from making such topics in the future.

Also, running is not the same as lifting weights just in case your underdeveloped mind can't understand that.
Smh why are you so mad ? I literally asked a question, at least the other guy gives good solid counter points to what I say instead of making it all wet and soppy. Go and cry in the corner.
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Xarao
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(Original post by lhh2003)
Smh why are you so mad ? I literally asked a question, at least the other guy gives good solid counter points to what I say instead of making it all wet and soppy. Go and cry in the corner.
Didn't you make a thread recently about how you want a degree that's for hard working people? :rofl:
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Toscana
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Why’d you care? It doesn’t affect you does it?
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Xerx
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(Original post by lhh2003)
Smh why are you so mad ? I literally asked a question, at least the other guy gives good solid counter points to what I say instead of making it all wet and soppy. Go and cry in the corner.
Your whole post is you being ignorant.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Toscana)
Why’d you care? It doesn’t affect you does it?
Well I'm trying to understand the reasoning because my friends have been encouraging me to go but I don't see the benefits between ages 16 and 23. And plus once I go to the gym I end up being really tired and my work becomes less productive, so I have to schedule it in at the end of the day which means less downtime, which affects my productivity the next day.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Xerx)
Your whole post is you being ignorant.
I'm just trying to get a variety of opinions because there is logic in the points I said. I can see why I may come across as ignorant though so my apologies; I didn't intend to.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Xarao)
Didn't you make a thread recently about how you want a degree that's for hard working people? :rofl:
Congratulations, you know how to read someones post history !! Clearly you're so traumatised by my post that you failed to even read how I detailed that time spent at the gym could be used to learn skills that will set you up for life. Once again, you're letting your emotions cloud your judgement.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by lhh2003)
Obviously Im not saying going to the gym is bad, in fact it can be a good stress reliever, but so are activities like push ups / running / palates , which doesn't require the much more rigorous lifestyle for effectively the same results; the only difference being one makes you muscular (the other activities can help you lose weight) at a much bigger cost, in a time when nobody is gonna see you with your clothes off.
As I mentioned in my first post, the cost of going to the gym is not “much bigger”. Also, why do you think everything revolves around people seeing you with your clothes of? Did you even read my first post?
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Xarao
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
As I mentioned in my first post, the cost of going to the gym is not “much bigger”. Also, why do you think everything revolves around people seeing you with your clothes of? Did you even read my first post?
There's honestly no point replying to OP. Clearly a :troll:
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
As I mentioned in my first post, the cost of going to the gym is not “much bigger”. Also, why do you think everything revolves around people seeing you with your clothes of? Did you even read my first post?
You say that "people go for themselves". Can you elaborate on what you mean by that ?
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Xarao)
There's honestly no point replying to OP. Clearly a :troll:
Lol you haven't came here to debate, you came here to try and start an argument.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by lhh2003)
You say that "people go for themselves". Can you elaborate on what you mean by that ?
People go because they enjoy it and want to better themselves. For a lot of people it’s stress relief and something to focus attention on. It is possible to have intrinsically motivated goals and want to look good for yourself rather than someone else. It’s nice to work for something and then see the results of your work. You might look in the mirror and be proud or carry yourself more confidently.
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lhh2003
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
People go because they enjoy it and want to better themselves. For a lot of people it’s stress relief and something to focus attention on. It is possible to have intrinsically motivated goals and want to look good for yourself rather than someone else. It’s nice to work for something and then see the results of your work. You might look in the mirror and be proud or carry yourself more confidently.
You see, that makes sense.
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MalcolmX
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following a gym regime and developing skills to increase employability are not mutually exclusive...

you do not need any supplements to increase muscle mass, nor do you need to eat raw chicken six times a day.

you seem very misinformed.
Last edited by MalcolmX; 3 weeks ago
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lhh2003
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(Original post by MalcolmX)
following a gym regime and developing skills to increase employability are not mutually exclusive...

you do not need any supplements to increase muscle mass, nor do you need to eat raw chicken six times a week.

you seem very misinformed.
2 hours is a lot of time on a school night.
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