_aNtArCtIcA_
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
taking any insight really, just a bit overwhelmed about where i should go to at the moment - it isn't for quite a few years yet but kinda hoping for some guidance in which is the best for physics and/or astronomy? x
0
reply
alishacrowe
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
(Original post by _aNtArCtIcA_)
taking any insight really, just a bit overwhelmed about where i should go to at the moment - it isn't for quite a few years yet but kinda hoping for some guidance in which is the best for physics and/or astronomy? x
Best thing would be to narrow it down to location first, do you want to be near home, in the middle or far away, that narrows it down! Are you interested in a range of uni's or are you aiming to apply to Russel group uni's (e.g. top unis). You should consider the modules in each year of study, do they interest you. Also look at whether there's any placements, the practicals (Labs) and whether this suites you. Also definitely consider societies, if you have a current interest e.g. tennis, you could look at uni societies for your interests. Location and accommodation are important. I didn't want to go to a uni where I would have to travel from my flat to the campus, therefore I opted for a campus uni with everything on site. Thats definitely important. Look at the uni league tables for physics and astronomy, not just the ranking but the employability rate for that course, the enjoyment rate etc... At the end of study uni's usually get people to complete a student survey for their course, I did for mine which is where these ratings come from. I went to the Uni of Lincoln (grad this year) and didn't study those subjects but did enjoy it, its an up and coming uni, going up each year. Definitely try to steer clear of following friends etc to uni's as its your decision. Hope this helps
1
reply
_aNtArCtIcA_
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#3
(Original post by alishacrowe)
Best thing would be to narrow it down to location first, do you want to be near home, in the middle or far away, that narrows it down! Are you interested in a range of uni's or are you aiming to apply to Russel group uni's (e.g. top unis). You should consider the modules in each year of study, do they interest you. Also look at whether there's any placements, the practicals (Labs) and whether this suites you. Also definitely consider societies, if you have a current interest e.g. tennis, you could look at uni societies for your interests. Location and accommodation are important. I didn't want to go to a uni where I would have to travel from my flat to the campus, therefore I opted for a campus uni with everything on site. Thats definitely important. Look at the uni league tables for physics and astronomy, not just the ranking but the employability rate for that course, the enjoyment rate etc... At the end of study uni's usually get people to complete a student survey for their course, I did for mine which is where these ratings come from. I went to the Uni of Lincoln (grad this year) and didn't study those subjects but did enjoy it, its an up and coming uni, going up each year. Definitely try to steer clear of following friends etc to uni's as its your decision. Hope this helps
Thank you so much 😊 I'll take that all into consideration
1
reply
University of Bath
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 months ago
#4
(Original post by _aNtArCtIcA_)
taking any insight really, just a bit overwhelmed about where i should go to at the moment - it isn't for quite a few years yet but kinda hoping for some guidance in which is the best for physics and/or astronomy? x
Hi there,

The most important thing to consider when comparing universities is the course contents, i.e. what modules are offered in the course at that specific uni. Lots of unis offer physics and astronomy degrees, but they may teach it slightly differently. Some may have more interesting modules, others may focus more on one area than another. Some courses may be heavily exam-based, others more coursework based. The modules you study and how you are examined can really make or break a course, and is a huge factor in your grades. I personally perform better in coursework than exams, and I like having more optional modules available so I can personalise my course to suit my tastes (and not have compulsory modules I don't want to study), which is why I chose Bath over other unis I considered. I would recommend looking at some universities that are well-ranking for courses you are interested in (here is a good ranking list for Physics and Astronomy courses) and then look at the modules they offer. You can see details of Bath's physics courses (i.e. the modules and how you are examined) here in the unit catalogue.

Once you've narrowed down some to ones that seem like they'd appeal to you, then you should compare them based on other factors such as:

Location
You'll be at the university for 3-4 years at least, so it's important that you choose somewhere that you can envision yourself being happy living in. I'll compare some of the pros and cons of city and campus unis to help:
City
Such as Uni of Edinburgh, Imperial College and UCL.
PROS
  • More to do in cities, so are generally more fun and sociable - ALWAYS something to do
  • You will meet people from all walks of life, not just students
  • Better nightlife and entertainment
  • More culturally diverse
CONS
  • Usually (but not always) more expensive for things like rent and transport
  • Some people don't like being somewhere busy like a city
  • Not a "traditional" or stereotypical uni experience like you see in movies/TV
Campus

Such as Uni of Bath and Uni of Warwick
PROS

  • It is very convenient to be living a minutes walk from your lectures, with small supermarket, bank etc on campus
  • Tend to be cheaper
  • A more traditional/stereotypical uni experience

CONS

  • If you're very sociable and outgoing, you may find campus unis a bit quiet and boring
  • Campus unis tend to be in smaller cities, with mostly students. This means you tend to be around mainly students, whereas in cities you'll meet people from all walks of life.
  • Nightlife isn't as good as clubs tend to be smaller and the SU is usually the focal point of nightlife.
  • The bubble effect, where it feels like the university and campus is the whole world so when you graduate and go into the real world, it all feels a lot different.

These are obviously not set in stone, but more general comparisons. They don't necessarily apply to all unis of either category - for example, city unis are generally more expensive. Bath is a campus uni, but it is as (if not more) expensive than city unis.



Extracurriculars and Societies/Sports
All universities offer some forms of sports and societies, but they'll vary at each uni massively. Societies and sports are a huge part of uni life, so I'd recommend checking out what they offer at each university. For example, a lot of people choose Bath as our sports facilities are top class (to the point that Olympic athletes use them to train) and because we offer a good range of different societies.

University Ranking
University ranking are important to look at, as going to a higher ranking uni will mean you are more employable (as obviously employers want people who have gone to better unis). HOWEVER, I would take ranking/league tables with a pinch of salt. Cambridge is more highly ranking overall than Imperial and Bath, for example, but Bath and Imperial may be higher ranking for specific courses, or for other important factors such as student satisfaction. Essentially, look at ranking tables but make sure to not get tunnel vision, and consider other factors as well. On top of this, going to the highest ranking uni isn't always the most important thing. Rather go to a lower ranking uni that suits you to a T and get a first in your degree, than going to the highest ranking uni but not enjoying your time and getting a 3rd in your degree.

More Unique Benefits
Some universities offer things that others don't. For example, Bath offers industrial placements as part of most of their degrees, so you can go and work in industry for a year. You can earn a salary, get invaluable work and life experience, get industry connections and boost you CV. All in all, placements are a great way to figure out what career you want to pursue, earn some money and make yourself a more employable graduate. There will be other things that other unis offer that set them above others, but placements are the first example off the top of my head.

All in all, I'd say to consider these factors and find a course that suits you, not necessarily the best ranking course that teachers encourage you to go for. You'll be there for 3-4 years, so you want to make sure you find one that suits you

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a third year NatSci student
1
reply
_aNtArCtIcA_
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#5
(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there,

The most important thing to consider when comparing universities is the course contents, i.e. what modules are offered in the course at that specific uni. Lots of unis offer physics and astronomy degrees, but they may teach it slightly differently. Some may have more interesting modules, others may focus more on one area than another. Some courses may be heavily exam-based, others more coursework based. The modules you study and how you are examined can really make or break a course, and is a huge factor in your grades. I personally perform better in coursework than exams, and I like having more optional modules available so I can personalise my course to suit my tastes (and not have compulsory modules I don't want to study), which is why I chose Bath over other unis I considered. I would recommend looking at some universities that are well-ranking for courses you are interested in (here is a good ranking list for Physics and Astronomy courses) and then look at the modules they offer. You can see details of Bath's physics courses (i.e. the modules and how you are examined) here in the unit catalogue.

Once you've narrowed down some to ones that seem like they'd appeal to you, then you should compare them based on other factors such as:

Location
You'll be at the university for 3-4 years at least, so it's important that you choose somewhere that you can envision yourself being happy living in. I'll compare some of the pros and cons of city and campus unis to help:
City
Such as Uni of Edinburgh, Imperial College and UCL.
PROS
  • More to do in cities, so are generally more fun and sociable - ALWAYS something to do
  • You will meet people from all walks of life, not just students
  • Better nightlife and entertainment
  • More culturally diverse
CONS
  • Usually (but not always) more expensive for things like rent and transport
  • Some people don't like being somewhere busy like a city
  • Not a "traditional" or stereotypical uni experience like you see in movies/TV
Campus

Such as Uni of Bath and Uni of Warwick
PROS

  • It is very convenient to be living a minutes walk from your lectures, with small supermarket, bank etc on campus
  • Tend to be cheaper
  • A more traditional/stereotypical uni experience

CONS

  • If you're very sociable and outgoing, you may find campus unis a bit quiet and boring
  • Campus unis tend to be in smaller cities, with mostly students. This means you tend to be around mainly students, whereas in cities you'll meet people from all walks of life.
  • Nightlife isn't as good as clubs tend to be smaller and the SU is usually the focal point of nightlife.
  • The bubble effect, where it feels like the university and campus is the whole world so when you graduate and go into the real world, it all feels a lot different.

These are obviously not set in stone, but more general comparisons. They don't necessarily apply to all unis of either category - for example, city unis are generally more expensive. Bath is a campus uni, but it is as (if not more) expensive than city unis.



Extracurriculars and Societies/Sports
All universities offer some forms of sports and societies, but they'll vary at each uni massively. Societies and sports are a huge part of uni life, so I'd recommend checking out what they offer at each university. For example, a lot of people choose Bath as our sports facilities are top class (to the point that Olympic athletes use them to train) and because we offer a good range of different societies.

University Ranking
University ranking are important to look at, as going to a higher ranking uni will mean you are more employable (as obviously employers want people who have gone to better unis). HOWEVER, I would take ranking/league tables with a pinch of salt. Cambridge is more highly ranking overall than Imperial and Bath, for example, but Bath and Imperial may be higher ranking for specific courses, or for other important factors such as student satisfaction. Essentially, look at ranking tables but make sure to not get tunnel vision, and consider other factors as well. On top of this, going to the highest ranking uni isn't always the most important thing. Rather go to a lower ranking uni that suits you to a T and get a first in your degree, than going to the highest ranking uni but not enjoying your time and getting a 3rd in your degree.

More Unique Benefits
Some universities offer things that others don't. For example, Bath offers industrial placements as part of most of their degrees, so you can go and work in industry for a year. You can earn a salary, get invaluable work and life experience, get industry connections and boost you CV. All in all, placements are a great way to figure out what career you want to pursue, earn some money and make yourself a more employable graduate. There will be other things that other unis offer that set them above others, but placements are the first example off the top of my head.

All in all, I'd say to consider these factors and find a course that suits you, not necessarily the best ranking course that teachers encourage you to go for. You'll be there for 3-4 years, so you want to make sure you find one that suits you

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a third year NatSci student
Thank you for this reply, this is truly helpful and informative for me - have a good day! 👋
Last edited by _aNtArCtIcA_; 5 months ago
0
reply
University of Bath
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 months ago
#6
(Original post by _aNtArCtIcA_)
Thank you for this reply, this is truly helpful and informative for me - have a good day! 👋
Hi,

No problem, I'm glad I could help!

Jessica, a third year NatSci student
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (707)
33.91%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (891)
42.73%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (394)
18.9%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (93)
4.46%

Watched Threads

View All