salimatu0912
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I'm a bit torn between which of the two disciplines to study at undergraduate level. I am aware that a biomedical degree can lead me to becoming a biomedical scientist who works in the NHS but i am not sure what a bachelors degree in biochemistry leads to.
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kittycollecter
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Pretty sure you can still be a medical scientist with a biochemistry degree??
You can check this website out to see what jobs ppl with the degree have gotten into etc.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...e/biochemistry
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davidthomasjnr
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If you actually want to be a biomedical scientist working in a lab, study a healthcare science or biomedical science degree. As long as the programme is IBMS accredited and guarantees placements in approved NHS training laboratories, you'll be able to complete your training portfolio during your placements, which is essential for HCPC registration, a requirement for any biomedical scientist job application. Healthcare science degrees are usually the better, more vocational programme nowadays for this route, because they usually guarantee relevant placements throughout the degree and shape the curriculum to ensure that by the time you graduate, you are ready to work and highly employable. Biomedical science programmes on the other hand, more commonly provide opportunities to go on a placement for a year, but usually require you to organise/ apply for your lab placement independently, unless the university has some connections with a few labs. So, as long as the programme is IBMS accredited and you can get a placement in an appropriate laboratory, you can also complete the portfolio during a biomed degree.

For any other careers, particular research/ academia-related, biomed or biochem are fairly interchangeable, depending on what field you are interested in. Look into each programme carefully when deciding which universities you want to apply for, as modules significantly vary depending on the institution. I'd also recommend looking for programmes that provide a placement, so you can do research or an internship to make you more employable/ academically competitive, earn money for a year, and deepen your subject knowledge. Placement in my biomed degree helped me in all these aspects. Biochemistry tends to be broader and modules range from plant biology, ecology, neuroscience and more detailed biochemistry to overlapping biomedical science content, which is primarily focussed on human physiology and disease. Biochemistry also tends to have more flexibility in module choices, so you can have quite unique combinations, whereas biomed (especially if IBMS accredited) have many compulsory modules, although they are generally quite interesting. Examples for biomed include microbiology (including bacteriology and virology), physiology, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, cancer (oncology) etc.

Hope this helps!
Last edited by davidthomasjnr; 5 months ago
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pineapple201
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
If you actually want to be a biomedical scientist working in a lab, study a healthcare science or biomedical science degree. As long as the programme is IBMS accredited and guarantees placements in approved NHS training laboratories, you'll be able to complete your training portfolio during your placements, which is essential for HCPC registration, a requirement for any biomedical scientist job application. Healthcare science degrees are usually the better, more vocational programme nowadays for this route, because they usually guarantee relevant placements throughout the degree and shape the curriculum to ensure that by the time you graduate, you are ready to work and highly employable. Biomedical science programmes on the other hand, more commonly provide opportunities to go on a placement for a year, but usually require you to organise/ apply for your lab placement independently, unless the university have some connections with a few labs. So, as long as the programme is IBMS accredited and you can get a placement in an appropriate laboratory, you can also complete the portfolio during a biomed degree.

For any other careers, particular research/ academia-related, biomed or biochem are fairly interchangeable, depending on what field you are interested in. Look into each programme carefully when deciding which universities you want to apply for, as modules significantly vary depending on the institution. I'd also recommend on looking for programmes that provide a placement, so you can do research or an internship to make you more employable/ academically competitive, earn money for a year, and deepen your subject knowledge. Placement in my biomed degree helped me in all these aspects. Biochemistry tends to be broader and modules range from plant biology, ecology, neuroscience and more detailed biochemistry to overlapping biomedical science content, which is primarily focussed on human physiology and disease. Biochemistry also tends to have more flexibility in module choices, so you can have quite unique combinations, whereas biomed (especially if IBMS accredited) have many compulsory modules, although they are generally quite interesting. Examples for biomed include microbiology (including bacteriology and virology), physiology, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, cancer (oncology) etc.

Hope this helps!
I've been told by some people that a Biomed degree that isn't IBMS accredited is often due to the university being more prestigious and being a research university. Is this true? 😕
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by pineapple201)
I've been told by some people that a Biomed degree that isn't IBMS accredited is often due to the university being more prestigious and being a research university. Is this true? 😕
I don’t think so, no. I assume by prestigious, you mean universities that are perceived as better than others, such as those in the Russell Group? In this case, it’s important to point out that several universities outside of this group choose not to apply for IBMS accreditation. A more likely reason for this, is to enable the programme to be geared towards topics beyond the scope of the compulsory modules required for IBMS accreditation. This would allow universities to intensify the curriculum towards research and academia, whilst retaining the more vocational/ practical aspects of biomedical science if they wanted. Another reason could be due to the effort required for the university to maintain the curriculum, so it is IBMS accredited. Accreditation renewal occurs yearly, and costs money, effort and time to maintain. If the goal is to produce research scientists or academic staff, IBMS accreditation isn’t particularly necessary.
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