chloenix
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This is a very very stupid question. I'm only in Year 12 and I've never studied law so I just want to say that I'm completely aware how dumb this is, but if you don't ask you won't know.

When you study law at university, what do assessments consist of? Do you write essays, if so, what are the titles of these essays like? Or is it more like maths where you have a paper and work out 'answers' by applying rules?
Can someone please explain what you actually DO, assessment-wise?

Thank you. Once again I know this is dumb lol
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by chloenix)
This is a very very stupid question. I'm only in Year 12 and I've never studied law so I just want to say that I'm completely aware how dumb this is, but if you don't ask you won't know.

When you study law at university, what do assessments consist of? Do you write essays, if so, what are the titles of these essays like? Or is it more like maths where you have a paper and work out 'answers' by applying rules?
Can someone please explain what you actually DO, assessment-wise?

Thank you. Once again I know this is dumb lol
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...t%20university

I made a thread with the same question in the past, feel free to look at the answers given I think they are quite good.
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chloenix
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...t%20university

I made a thread with the same question in the past, feel free to look at the answers given I think they are quite good.
Great thank you!
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rhysbresland
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(Original post by chloenix)
This is a very very stupid question. I'm only in Year 12 and I've never studied law so I just want to say that I'm completely aware how dumb this is, but if you don't ask you won't know.

When you study law at university, what do assessments consist of? Do you write essays, if so, what are the titles of these essays like? Or is it more like maths where you have a paper and work out 'answers' by applying rules?
Can someone please explain what you actually DO, assessment-wise?

Thank you. Once again I know this is dumb lol
Hey! I've just finished my first year of university studying law, so hopefully I can give you a little insight! I didn't have much in the form of law knowledge before I started the degree, but the first year definitely teaches you the basics, and everything that you need to learn to build a foundation. My first year modules consisted of: Introduction to law, Legal system and skills, Contract law, Public law, Ethics and Contemporary legal issues.

In my opinion, the first year is a little dreary... you're not exactly thrown straight into criminal law or learning how to necessarily apply the law, but it does give you a lot of knowledge on the constitution and the ECHR, and also the basics of how the law it formatted in the UK. It can be interesting, it can be dull, it comes as a parcel I'm afraid. The second and third years have more interesting module topics, and you'll learn more about what you specifically want to learn.

As for assessment, you'll have both assignments and exams. Throughout my first year I had three exams and three assignments. The exams are three hours long but you'll definitely need that time. The assignments are really quite simple, as long as you spend enough time on it and study in depth.

Hope this helps )
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chloenix
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(Original post by rhysbresland)
Hey! I've just finished my first year of university studying law, so hopefully I can give you a little insight! I didn't have much in the form of law knowledge before I started the degree, but the first year definitely teaches you the basics, and everything that you need to learn to build a foundation. My first year modules consisted of: Introduction to law, Legal system and skills, Contract law, Public law, Ethics and Contemporary legal issues.

In my opinion, the first year is a little dreary... you're not exactly thrown straight into criminal law or learning how to necessarily apply the law, but it does give you a lot of knowledge on the constitution and the ECHR, and also the basics of how the law it formatted in the UK. It can be interesting, it can be dull, it comes as a parcel I'm afraid. The second and third years have more interesting module topics, and you'll learn more about what you specifically want to learn.

As for assessment, you'll have both assignments and exams. Throughout my first year I had three exams and three assignments. The exams are three hours long but you'll definitely need that time. The assignments are really quite simple, as long as you spend enough time on it and study in depth.

Hope this helps )
This was so so helpful! Thank you so much
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Joleee
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i can tell you what school was like for me, but you must bear in mind there are a million law degrees in the UK and they aren't all gonna be the same. i had a flatmate last year doing law at a different uni and her course was way different to mine in how they assessed and what they studied (more so on how they assessed cuz some subjects are universal like crim and contract).

for me, every subject had one essay and one exam (exam worth 63% of final grade). in the exam you answer both essay style and problem style questions (i.e. 'work out' the answer by applying law, fact and argument). honestly, it's not like what you see on TV. there's no debating during lectures, not even really in seminars because everyone is too worried about understanding the material and what you need to know for the exam. course there will always be one random person who tries to impress everyone by arguing with a student or the seminar leader, but it's just 'that' person and not really expected of you (tho you *might* be called on to answer a question).

it's not boring; i never heard anyone say it was boring and i talked to loads of people. probably helps tho if you genuinely love law, your friends love it, you have a decent relationship with the staff and a good law library. how come you ask btw? what interests you in law?
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chloenix
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(Original post by Joleee)
i can tell you what school was like for me, but you must bear in mind there are a million law degrees in the UK and they aren't all gonna be the same. i had a flatmate last year doing law at a different uni and her course was way different to mine in how they assessed and what they studied (more so on how they assessed cuz some subjects are universal like crim and contract).

for me, every subject had one essay and one exam (exam worth 63% of final grade). in the exam you answer both essay style and problem style questions (i.e. 'work out' the answer by applying law, fact and argument). honestly, it's not like what you see on TV. there's no debating during lectures, not even really in seminars because everyone is too worried about understanding the material and what you need to know for the exam. course there will always be one random person who tries to impress everyone by arguing with a student or the seminar leader, but it's just 'that' person and not really expected of you (tho you *might* be called on to answer a question).

it's not boring; i never heard anyone say it was boring and i talked to loads of people. probably helps tho if you genuinely love law, your friends love it, you have a decent relationship with the staff and a good law library. how come you ask btw? what interests you in law?
This was such a helpful response, thank you for taking your time to write it!
I want to study Law at university (it's my first choice at the moment) and I thought I should learn more about the degree before committing fully to writing about it in my Personal Statement! I'm interested in law for a number of reasons. I think the subject sounds fascinating, the fact that pretty much everything we do is structured by these invisible laws. I also think it's so interesting how laws aren't absolute and they apply to situations in different ways. I've also always been drawn to the profession of being a lawyer, I think I would genuinely enjoy using the law to defend people. Obviously the thing about Law is that most people have never studied it beforehand so although I think I would like to study it, I can't be 100% sure!
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hallamstudents
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(Original post by chloenix)
This is a very very stupid question. I'm only in Year 12 and I've never studied law so I just want to say that I'm completely aware how dumb this is, but if you don't ask you won't know.

When you study law at university, what do assessments consist of? Do you write essays, if so, what are the titles of these essays like? Or is it more like maths where you have a paper and work out 'answers' by applying rules?
Can someone please explain what you actually DO, assessment-wise?

Thank you. Once again I know this is dumb lol
Hi chloenix

Different university's will have a different way of teaching law. When I studied Law, I had 6 modules each year about a different area of Law, so for example Criminal Law was one of my modules. I would usually have an exam and a piece of coursework for each module, which would both weigh 50 percent. Some of the coursework’s were problem questions so I had to apply the law and advise the person in the scenario, however I also had some essay questions where I also had to critique the law. The exams usually had both problem and essay questions; however I was able to pick which ones I wanted to answer.

The practical modules I had they were assessed differently. So, for example this year I did a module called Law in Practice, where I went into a Law firm once a week. This was assessed by a portfolio of the work I had done whilst on placement. For other practical modules I had to do research records and letters to clients.

I hope this helps a little, let me know if you have any further questions. 😊

Zaira 😊
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chloenix
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(Original post by hallamstudents)
Hi chloenix

Different university's will have a different way of teaching law. When I studied Law, I had 6 modules each year about a different area of Law, so for example Criminal Law was one of my modules. I would usually have an exam and a piece of coursework for each module, which would both weigh 50 percent. Some of the coursework’s were problem questions so I had to apply the law and advise the person in the scenario, however I also had some essay questions where I also had to critique the law. The exams usually had both problem and essay questions; however I was able to pick which ones I wanted to answer.

The practical modules I had they were assessed differently. So, for example this year I did a module called Law in Practice, where I went into a Law firm once a week. This was assessed by a portfolio of the work I had done whilst on placement. For other practical modules I had to do research records and letters to clients.

I hope this helps a little, let me know if you have any further questions. 😊

Zaira 😊
This was so helpful thank you for explaining!
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Catherine1973
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Also doing a law degree. In my first year we did
Land law (which I think Is probably boring as hell to anyone under 30, I enjoyed it after having bought property and owning a flat)
Public law -all about politics and how we are governed and judges.
Contract law
Eu law (half year)
Criminal law
Exams were a mix of multiple choice for Eu, the rest were 3 hour exams for 75% and 3000 word essays for rest of marks.
Usually had a choice of essay or problem question in exams. Bar things like public law which has less problems to solve.
Maybe read letters to a law student to see more.
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Mayataylor
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(Original post by chloenix)
This was such a helpful response, thank you for taking your time to write it!
I want to study Law at university (it's my first choice at the moment) and I thought I should learn more about the degree before committing fully to writing about it in my Personal Statement! I'm interested in law for a number of reasons. I think the subject sounds fascinating, the fact that pretty much everything we do is structured by these invisible laws. I also think it's so interesting how laws aren't absolute and they apply to situations in different ways. I've also always been drawn to the profession of being a lawyer, I think I would genuinely enjoy using the law to defend people. Obviously the thing about Law is that most people have never studied it beforehand so although I think I would like to study it, I can't be 100% sure!
Remember you don’t have to study law to become a lawyer! But if you want to study law because you think you will love it as an academic discipline then go for it. The law is very different in academia than in practice.
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chloenix
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(Original post by Mayataylor)
Remember you don’t have to study law to become a lawyer! But if you want to study law because you think you will love it as an academic discipline then go for it. The law is very different in academia than in practice.
Really I didn't know that! How else can you become a lawyer out of curiosity?
And to be honest I am genuinely interested in the subject as a whole, and these replies have made me want to study it even more! But thank you for the advice
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Mayataylor
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(Original post by chloenix)
Really I didn't know that! How else can you become a lawyer out of curiosity?
And to be honest I am genuinely interested in the subject as a whole, and these replies have made me want to study it even more! But thank you for the advice
You can study whatever you want and then do a law conversion: the GDL and LPC/BPTC (now the SQE to become a solicitor). I’m surprised you didn’t know that as it suggests to me that you have not really looked into law. Perhaps do some more research about career paths into law, the law degree itself nad other subjects that may interest you to help your decision.
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chloenix
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(Original post by Mayataylor)
You can study whatever you want and then do a law conversion: the GDL and LPC/BPTC (now the SQE to become a solicitor). I’m surprised you didn’t know that as it suggests to me that you have not really looked into law. Perhaps do some more research about career paths into law, the law degree itself nad other subjects that may interest you to help your decision.
Ohh right no I knew that you could do that I thought you meant something else. And yeah I'm not sure I want to study any other courses as no other degrees interest me enough.
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