sadasdasfsfafg
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Hey!
I am currently interested in getting a degree in a form of engineering, I heard many people say that it is not "noble" as they think that NASA engineers and the people who fix your boiler are the same ?!?!?

after finishing your degree, what were the career opportunities like? what interesting companies are there in the UK?

Do you feel fufilled in your work? I dont want to get into engineering and feel like a small clock in a giant corporate machine.
I spoke to an engineer, and I asked where he worked, and he told me he developed "oil pipes" for oil companies. Personally I dont find that interesting. are there a lot of "fufilling" jobs in the UK, for example (space travel, electric vechiles etc...) I want to have a job that is fufilling, not boring.

What is daily life like for you? Do you sit in a desk? or are you more hands on?
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sadasdasfsfafg
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Helloworld_95
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In general most work in any professional job will tend more towards small cog in a big machine kind of thing, whether in the UK or elsewhere like the US. If you're working on space travel or electric vehicles then you would probably be very focused on a single motor design, or even a component of that motor. The exceptions would be either later on in your career or getting into something which is at a very early stage of development. At some small companies you might do more but they also often specialise on more specific things or less fulfilling things as you put it.

If you want to do something prestigious, which I think is what you're really trying to say, then you need to have an extremely good eye for current and future trends. And that will often mean working from a desk.

If you want to be up and about a bit more then you will need to pick your job wisely, or you might be better off not going the degree route and going the apprenticeship route instead.

I'm currently doing my PhD on Wind Energy and specifically a fairly big picture topic within Wind Energy, but I didn't choose it because of those things and I don't know any other PhDs who are in a similar situation. Most PhDs are involved in a very specific topic which lends itself to small cog in a big machine again.

My coursemates went on to work at major companies like Airbus, JLR, McLaren, and also smaller impactful firms like Reaction Engines and Volocopter but their situation was pretty much the same.

Major engineering projects are just far too complicated nowadays for anyone to solely develop major components within them.

If you really like engineering then you'll still enjoy it though.
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sadasdasfsfafg
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
In general most work in any professional job will tend more towards small cog in a big machine kind of thing, whether in the UK or elsewhere like the US. If you're working on space travel or electric vehicles then you would probably be very focused on a single motor design, or even a component of that motor. The exceptions would be either later on in your career or getting into something which is at a very early stage of development. At some small companies you might do more but they also often specialise on more specific things or less fulfilling things as you put it.

If you want to do something prestigious, which I think is what you're really trying to say, then you need to have an extremely good eye for current and future trends. And that will often mean working from a desk.

If you want to be up and about a bit more then you will need to pick your job wisely, or you might be better off not going the degree route and going the apprenticeship route instead.

I'm currently doing my PhD on Wind Energy and specifically a fairly big picture topic within Wind Energy, but I didn't choose it because of those things and I don't know any other PhDs who are in a similar situation. Most PhDs are involved in a very specific topic which lends itself to small cog in a big machine again.

My coursemates went on to work at major companies like Airbus, JLR, McLaren, and also smaller impactful firms like Reaction Engines and Volocopter but their situation was pretty much the same.

Major engineering projects are just far too complicated nowadays for anyone to solely develop major components within them.

If you really like engineering then you'll still enjoy it though.
thank you!
what is your plan after your PhD?
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sadasdasfsfafg
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trapking
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(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
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In my honest opinion if you're going to do engineering go through the degree apprentiship path where you'll end up with no debt. University is a scam, it really is. I've learned more doing the actual job than sitting in a lecture hall learning about pointless things. It will not teach you life skills which you need and it also won't teach you the practical side of engineering.

Alternatively, go to a Scottish uni if you're Scottish since they don't have to pay tution fees. I don't want to give my full opinion yet on how life is as an actual engineer...because I want to be sure I'm saying the right thing. So I'll wait till I've had about 1 years experience, I have been at my current job now for about 4 months.
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sadasdasfsfafg
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(Original post by trapking)
In my honest opinion if you're going to do engineering go through the degree apprentiship path where you'll end up with no debt. University is a scam, it really is. I've learned more doing the actual job than sitting in a lecture hall learning about pointless things. It will not teach you life skills which you need and it also won't teach you the practical side of engineering.

Alternatively, go to a Scottish uni if you're Scottish since they don't have to pay tution fees. I don't want to give my full opinion yet on how life is as an actual engineer...because I want to be sure I'm saying the right thing. So I'll wait till I've had about 1 years experience, I have been at my current job now for about 4 months.
sorry for the late reply,
do you feel fufilled right now with your job?
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trapking
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(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
sorry for the late reply,
do you feel fufilled right now with your job?
Not really. I'm realising uni was a total waste of time.

I will start my own thing one day but for now not yet.
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
Hey!
I am currently interested in getting a degree in a form of engineering, I heard many people say that it is not "noble" as they think that NASA engineers and the people who fix your boiler are the same ?!?!?

after finishing your degree, what were the career opportunities like? what interesting companies are there in the UK?

Do you feel fufilled in your work? I dont want to get into engineering and feel like a small clock in a giant corporate machine.
I spoke to an engineer, and I asked where he worked, and he told me he developed "oil pipes" for oil companies. Personally I dont find that interesting. are there a lot of "fufilling" jobs in the UK, for example (space travel, electric vechiles etc...) I want to have a job that is fufilling, not boring.

What is daily life like for you? Do you sit in a desk? or are you more hands on?
It depends most of all on yourself and the people around you in my opinion.

Even a 'cog in a machine' can feel fulfilling if the general work ethic around you is good. And most large corporations will noticeably vary in their culture from office to office as well. I can't generalise this very well to be honest.

I've been unlucky over the past year. I have very few positive remarks. Most people are happy doing bollox provided they get paid for it, and it is very difficult to hold out against this sort of mentality on your own for long. I moved to London recently for this reason, but little has changed yet in that respect (because I'm still doing the same job, just remotely). It is pathetic. Imagine having all the energy and enthusiasm, and being proactive, organised and strategic in the work you do... only for your efforts to get diluted by a formless mass of disorganised complacency and lacklusterness, over and over. There have been numerous instances where I've done the best job I could, and even made a strong impact on a few occasions. But most of the time, I don't even get clear instructions. When I ask for clarification, it is just as vague, then once the work is done they change their mind (often for extremely whimsical reasons) meaning I have to do the same da*ned thing 2 or 3 times. Only because, they didn't think first. Something that should take 20 hours, then takes 40. I just had another provocative Skype call an hour ago, where my supervisor changed his mind for the 3rd time above what legend he wants on a technical drawing. So, I am hating it at the moment.

I don't think this reflects on the industry as a whole, just on certain 'types' of people. Avoid those types. During interviews, ask them questions as well. Specific questions, and see if they themselves even are able to clearly explain the work they're doing, and give good answers to questions like "why did you do it this way?". If they can't... then avoid working there. If even they don't enjoy the work they do or find it engaging, you probably will not either. It may not always be convenient to bend the conversation that way, but you should try.

I could ramble a lot more. That honestly is just a fraction of the problems I've had. I've had some good experiences too, but those were a while ago by now. My past year has been a stream of bollox that's made me angry and damaged my self esteem more than anything else.

Edit: if you are applying for a generic graduate roll, it is unlikely you will be interviewed by the people you will be working with. In which case, asking them specific questions like I said you should do, won't make any difference.
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Mustafa0605
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(Original post by trapking)
In my honest opinion if you're going to do engineering go through the degree apprentiship path where you'll end up with no debt. University is a scam, it really is. I've learned more doing the actual job than sitting in a lecture hall learning about pointless things. It will not teach you life skills which you need and it also won't teach you the practical side of engineering.

Alternatively, go to a Scottish uni if you're Scottish since they don't have to pay tution fees. I don't want to give my full opinion yet on how life is as an actual engineer...because I want to be sure I'm saying the right thing. So I'll wait till I've had about 1 years experience, I have been at my current job now for about 4 months.
I wouldn’t say it’s a scam. International students pay 20-30k a year to study engineering in English universities. 9.25k a year is not that much for world class degree level education. It’s the same fee as someone doing an art degree or a history degree or most other degrees in England so it’s probably well worth it for engineering.
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mnot
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(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
Hey!
I am currently interested in getting a degree in a form of engineering, I heard many people say that it is not "noble" as they think that NASA engineers and the people who fix your boiler are the same ?!?!?

after finishing your degree, what were the career opportunities like? what interesting companies are there in the UK?

Do you feel fufilled in your work? I dont want to get into engineering and feel like a small clock in a giant corporate machine.
I spoke to an engineer, and I asked where he worked, and he told me he developed "oil pipes" for oil companies. Personally I dont find that interesting. are there a lot of "fufilling" jobs in the UK, for example (space travel, electric vechiles etc...) I want to have a job that is fufilling, not boring.

What is daily life like for you? Do you sit in a desk? or are you more hands on?
So ive spent time with a major engineer employer in the automotive world (company had a couple thousand engineers) and ive spent time as a researcher in academic science/engineering.

Working with an employer was pretty good, you join a bit like a cohort, you get lots of training and you sort of work within a small team with a direct manager. TBH its a pretty nice life, pay is decent (yes I know some industries pay more than), you work on fairly engaging work in mostly a relaxed atmosphere for 37 hours a week.

There is definitely a bit of a cog in the system feel to it but I found the engineering professionals still get to have an impact. Its pretty cool seeing stuff you've done move through the R&D cycle knowing its made an impact on the world. I would say most engineers were very content as the expectation was basically 40 hours a week & you could leave early on a Friday.

What is the work like: 50% 'adult play time' i.e. doing cool interesting things ultimately on a product I loved (I chose this industry because I love the product we were dealing with, and so did most of my colleagues), the other 50% is dealing with the corporate side of the job email/meetings/administration (I never really minded this stuff, its not exactly inspiring but enough of my time was working directly on R&D it wasn't as issue for me).

--
Now Im pursuing a PhD, which is quite different to in industry; its super interesting and I get to control the whole project, have a lot more oversight, get to do even more interesting stuff then industry and very little admin and I get to pick my hours, no holiday restrictions. It can be more stressful tho as everything is directly on my shoulders and when there isnt an obvious answer I have to work harder to find it. Id say the pure research is more fulfilling work but the pay is minimal compared to if I had taken one of my grad scheme offers.
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trapking
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(Original post by Mustafa0605)
I wouldn’t say it’s a scam. International students pay 20-30k a year to study engineering in English universities. 9.25k a year is not that much for world class degree level education. It’s the same fee as someone doing an art degree or a history degree or most other degrees in England so it’s probably well worth it for engineering.
It is a scam. That is the bitter truth, I had this conversation with another old friend of mine who has a MEng in EE from a top 10uni and has also worked as an engineer. He quit his job despite earning £30kish, job was dry and boring and soul sucking.

You will see it soon! I already know I won't be in engineering for a life time that's for sure... I'll be doing something else at some point.
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Student-95
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(Original post by trapking)
It is a scam. That is the bitter truth, I had this conversation with another old friend of mine who has a MEng in EE from a top 10uni and has also worked as an engineer. He quit his job despite earning £30kish, job was dry and boring and soul sucking.

You will see it soon! I already know I won't be in engineering for a life time that's for sure... I'll be doing something else at some point.
Why does your friend finding his job boring mean university is a scam?

I think the issue is more that people choose to study engineering (or other subjects) before they know what engineering actually is.
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trapking
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(Original post by Student-95)
Why does your friend finding his job boring mean university is a scam?

I think the issue is more that people choose to study engineering (or other subjects) before they know what engineering actually is.
Simple, because he doesn't really want to work as one anymore having had two jobs already working as one (not to mention we were discussing about how our degrees are essentially useless).

My advice would be if anyone wants to be an engineer then go through the degree-apprenticeship route (or if they are Scottish go to Scottish unis since they have no tuition fees). As for me, I've mentioned above already that I don't want to give my full opinion on this yet until I've had some time to really explore this.
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Student-95
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(Original post by trapking)
Simple, because he doesn't really want to work as one anymore having had two jobs already working as one (not to mention we were discussing about how our degrees are essentially useless).

My advice would be if anyone wants to be an engineer then go through the degree-apprenticeship route (or if they are Scottish go to Scottish unis since they have no tuition fees). As for me, I've mentioned above already that I don't want to give my full opinion on this yet until I've had some time to really explore this.
But again, it sounds like he doesn't like engineering (or at least the two jobs he's had - engineering is very broad). I don't see how that makes university a scam. Did his university tell him his job would be different?
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(Original post by trapking)
It is a scam. That is the bitter truth, I had this conversation with another old friend of mine who has a MEng in EE from a top 10uni and has also worked as an engineer. He quit his job despite earning £30kish, job was dry and boring and soul sucking.

You will see it soon! I already know I won't be in engineering for a life time that's for sure... I'll be doing something else at some point.
(Original post by Student-95)
Why does your friend finding his job boring mean university is a scam?

I think the issue is more that people choose to study engineering (or other subjects) before they know what engineering actually is.
yeah just finished my MEng in chemical engineering and I can tell you personally that every single element of this course is completely and utterly dead boring. At 18 I clearly didn't do enough research regarding the course content and focused solely on the money making and postgraduate opportunities but that alone shouldn't be reason to do a degree.
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(Original post by shortguy)
yeah just finished my MEng in chemical engineering and I can tell you personally that every single element of this course is completely and utterly dead boring. At 18 I clearly didn't do enough research regarding the course content and focused solely on the money making and postgraduate opportunities but that alone shouldn't be reason to do a degree.
:laugh:

The funny thing is there are plenty of threads with the same exact opinion you would think eventually people would wake up to it but they don't sadly.

I learned more in my job in 4-5 months than I have in my entire 5 years of university. Working as an engineer is different to studying at university and requires a different set of skills which you can only learn while doing the job. The degree is really just a piece of paper but you'll find you don't really "need" it.
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
But most of the time, I don't even get clear instructions. When I ask for clarification, it is just as vague, then once the work is done they change their mind (often for extremely whimsical reasons) meaning I have to do the same da*ned thing 2 or 3 times. Only because, they didn't think first. Something that should take 20 hours, then takes 40. I just had another provocative Skype call an hour ago, where my supervisor changed his mind for the 3rd time above what legend he wants on a technical drawing. So, I am hating it at the moment.
I go through this same exact problem at work literally...only difference for me is it's technical reports and analysis I've done. It never gets checked properly and I end up having to redo the same thing like 4-5 times just because people didn't check when I raised issues etc. But I won't lie it made me better because now I know what to look for and avoid but still it's very annoying :rofl:
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(Original post by trapking)
I go through this same exact problem at work literally...only difference for me it's technical reports and analysis I've done. It never gets checked properly and I end up having to redo the same thing like 4-5 times just because people didn't check when I raised issues etc. But I won't lie it made me better because now I know what to look for and avoid but still :rofl:
The specific office I am complaining about is going through a clamp-down at the moment. They were acquired a year ago by the firm I work for. Basically, they follow almost no quality control whatsoever.

For one project I did, the same work (the same identical piece of work) I did got checked and reviewed 3 times over at an approximate cost of £300 per check. Only because my supervisor forgot he had already checked it before and issued it out to be reviewed by the principal designer, who is 'one of those' people that will just gladly do the same stupid task over and over if someone asks him to, no questions asked.

They're not 'bad' people, but I do not like working with them. Nobody who values their own time and energy behaves this way, regardless of how much or little the get paid.
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
The specific office I am complaining about is going through a clamp-down at the moment. They were acquired a year ago by the firm I work for. Basically, they follow almost no quality control whatsoever.

For one project I did, the same work (the same identical piece of work) I did got checked and reviewed 3 times over at an approximate cost of £300 per check. Only because my supervisor forgot he had already checked it before and issued it out to be reviewed by the principal designer, who is 'one of those' people that will just gladly do the same stupid task over and over if someone asks him to, no questions asked.

They're not 'bad' people, but I do not like working with them. Nobody who values their own time and energy behaves this way, regardless of how much or little the get paid.
Oh man I'm laughing at this. I know what you mean

The best is when you've done a report literally almost identical to how it was done previously and then it goes through 2 people who checked it and said nothing... Then it gets to the engineering manager and he's like it's all wrong why is X, Y, Z included? And I'm thinking like... That is literally the same report you sent out months ago for the same analysis :laugh:
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