How do you determine undergraduate degree relevancy for postgraduate courses?

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Stb1750
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Hello,

I wasn't always planning to study a Masters degree, however, I have came across some very exciting subjects and I feel like I have it set in stone now to commit to that extra year; providing I get good grades, of course!

However, I am struggling to determine if my undergraduate course (Criminal Justice) has any relevance to my chosen postgraduate courses, which all look at Counter Terrorism; I want to join Police Staff Intelligence and get into the CT side.

The courses ask for a 'relevant degree' at minimum 2:1. Some give examples like Criminology, Psychology etc.

I am trying to understand if Criminal Justice (which I could possibly get as a bracketed award if I am allowed to take a particular focus on Policing) would fit the relevancy.

I tried emailing the universities but I just got the generic "check out the entry requirements page" response. I am trying to determine if it would be worth my time; if I would be seriously considered; or if I should look at other opportunities where I may find more success on getting an offer.

Thanks in advance!
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Quick-use
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I don't see why not. I studied modern languages at undergrad and got in for a Master's degree in Diplomacy and International Relations.

I'd strongly encourage you to email the admission's team and ask whether it's worth you applying. I did that and although they can't say whether you'll get in, they could affirm whether or not your background is deemed 'relevant' enough.

Try to think of how your undergraduate acted as a genesis for your further study in a less direct course area. For example, I mentioned how my research of Japanese soft power and nation branding opened me up to the world of foreign diplomatic affairs etc.

I'm sure you can do it! :rambo:
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Stb1750
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(Original post by Quick-use)
I don't see why not. I studied modern languages at undergrad and got in for a Master's degree in Diplomacy and International Relations.

I'd strongly encourage you to email the admission's team and ask whether it's worth you applying. I did that and although they can't say whether you'll get in, they could affirm whether or not your background is deemed 'relevant' enough.

Try to think of how your undergraduate acted as a genesis for your further study in a less direct course area. For example, I mentioned how my research of Japanese soft power and nation branding opened me up to the world of foreign diplomatic affairs etc.

I'm sure you can do it! :rambo:
Thanks for the response!

I would have thought that Criminal Justice would be relevant, although it's just one of these things where I can't seem to get a clear understanding to give me full confidence about applying.

I did email the respective admission teams. They just linked me to the entry requirements page. I have 3 years of undergraduate studying left and I think I would rather phone the admissions teams when the phone-lines are active again. I think I should get a clearer answer if I try speaking directly to them because at the end of the day I don't want to know if I would get in; I just want to know if my qualification would be regarded as relevant so I can be confident that my application would be seriously considered, rather than rejected on the basis that my qualification isn't suitable for entry on to the course.
Last edited by Stb1750; 2 weeks ago
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jackien1
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(Original post by Stb1750)
Thanks for the response!

I would have thought that Criminal Justice would be relevant, although it's just one of these things where I can't seem to get a clear understanding to give me full confidence about applying.

I did email the respective admission teams. They just linked me to the entry requirements page. I have 3 years of undergraduate studying left and I think I would rather phone the admissions teams when the phone-lines are active again. I think I should get a clearer answer if I try speaking directly to them because at the end of the day I don't want to know if I would get in; I just want to know if my qualification would be regarded as relevant so I can be confident that my application would be seriously considered, rather than rejected on the basis that my qualification isn't suitable for entry on to the course.
Instead of the admissions team, I find that directly emailing a module coordinator or if listed, the course director, tends to yield much better results.
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Stb1750
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(Original post by jackien1)
Instead of the admissions team, I find that directly emailing a module coordinator or if listed, the course director, tends to yield much better results.
Thanks! I managed to find a course director with an email address for one of the courses. I think I will phone the other 2 when appropriate and phone this one if the Course Directorate isn't able to help.

Thanks.
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mike23mike
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(Original post by Stb1750)
Hello,

I wasn't always planning to study a Masters degree, however, I have came across some very exciting subjects and I feel like I have it set in stone now to commit to that extra year; providing I get good grades, of course!

However, I am struggling to determine if my undergraduate course (Criminal Justice) has any relevance to my chosen postgraduate courses, which all look at Counter Terrorism; I want to join Police Staff Intelligence and get into the CT side.

The courses ask for a 'relevant degree' at minimum 2:1. Some give examples like Criminology, Psychology etc.

I am trying to understand if Criminal Justice (which I could possibly get as a bracketed award if I am allowed to take a particular focus on Policing) would fit the relevancy.

I tried emailing the universities but I just got the generic "check out the entry requirements page" response. I am trying to determine if it would be worth my time; if I would be seriously considered; or if I should look at other opportunities where I may find more success on getting an offer.

Thanks in advance!
You have done the right thing in contacting the uni but it's disappointing that they did not respond to your query with a personalise response. Says something about the uni in question. It's normal for applicants to ask such questions and the uni should have responded since you are just as confused as before.

I think your degree topic is relevant - it's not like you did a degree in English or Geography and then applied for a Counter-Terrorism masters.
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Stb1750
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(Original post by mike23mike)
You have done the right thing in contacting the uni but it's disappointing that they did not respond to your query with a personalise response. Says something about the uni in question. It's normal for applicants to ask such questions and the uni should have responded since you are just as confused as before.

I think your degree topic is relevant - it's not like you did a degree in English or Geography and then applied for a Counter-Terrorism masters.
I am getting a bit more confident in thinking that my degree is relevant. I have got a few more emails through and some say the "relevant degree" is just a guideline and every application will be considered. I think my degree (when I pass it) will be satisfactory enough to go in my favour, but of course more goes towards my application with the personal statement and showing knowledge and genuine interest. It's only 2nd year I am going in to, so I still need to get through this year then 2 more years but I feel I have a road map and career aims and that's motivation enough for me
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kitkatkate281
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I would definitely say your degree is relevant The term “relevant” is very vague when it comes to masters admissions, and many masters students come from different academic backgrounds. I think if they really wanted students with a specific degree, they would normally be more specific and say something like “A degree in Criminology” for the entry requirements. Just make sure that when you write your personal statement, you write about how your undergrad is relevant, and like Quick-use said, link your studies to the masters, even if it’s not directly related
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