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    Regarding subjects studied, below are the University's matriculation requirements for A-level students:

    To be considered for admission to the University you must:

    * Present six subjects at grade C or above on GCSE or Advanced Subsidiary GCE (AS) papers. Two of these subjects must be at grade C or above on Advanced GCE (A-Level) papers.

    The six subjects above must include:

    * A pass in English
    * A pass in mathematics and a pass in a language other than English

    OR

    * a pass in Latin and a pass in a subject other than a language

    Notes:

    1. A pass means grade C or above on GCSE or Advanced Subsidiary GCE (AS) papers.
    2. Students may combine grades achieved in different sittings of their Advanced GCE (A-Level) examinations for the purpose of satisfying matriculation and/or course requirements, but not for the purposes of scoring.
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    (Original post by Frankly Vulgar)
    Seriously? Because I'm looking at UCD too, so I'd like to know whether the Protestant/Catholic divide is a serious thing or just a bit of rivalry.
    I've never heard of any such rivalry. I think people are too preoccupied in uni to give a damn.
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    (Original post by Frankly Vulgar)
    Seriously? Because I'm looking at UCD too, so I'd like to know whether the Protestant/Catholic divide is a serious thing or just a bit of rivalry.
    Twafle ! Most now are neither Protestant nor Catholic, wherever you go, and the massive Islamic centre behind UCD shows where trends are.
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    Yes CDP you do have a few good points... Yes sure, you make your own success. Yes what you've made of your undergrad is all important. Yes join a leader in the field for grad and find a good supervisor, with plenty of funding. Yes you determine your own fate. Yes a first from UCD is better than a II.1 from TCD. Yes it's the end result that is important!

    But I can't agree when you say...
    (Original post by CDP)
    Branding is over-rated.
    ... or...
    (Original post by CDP)
    You should not aim for overall reputation.
    ... or...
    (Original post by CDP)
    TCD is a great university, but there are a few others that are even better
    Why then are points for TCD higher across the board. Why is the GMAT entry level higher for grads? Why are undergrads "ready" to lose a 4th year at TCD? All concrete evidence of how the punters vote. Again, a bit less important from your hard sciences viewpoint. Very important for arts, social sciences and just about everything else, and widely perceived as such without a doubt.
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    I apologise - as a biochemist, I am often biased in my opinions when evaluating education as a whole! maybe it would be best to take my points with the intention that I expect you to look at grad school after?

    Sorry, its a bad habit! As a whole - TCD is a fantastic university. A lot of what they do (departmental structures, programmes etc) is adopted - albeit badly in other universities. They do set the standard I suppose when it comes to social sciences. I have a bad habit of looking at things from the point of view of a former science undergrad.

    I apologise for any misunderstanding! But I stick by my original sentiment - you are right, branding is probably much more important in the social sciences and the arts. Its far less important in my area - you identify your field of research, go the most cited and reputable PI's who are well funded and publishing prolifically etc. If they're in a prestigious place, its just a bonus but it certainly doesn't matter to how your peers will perceive you in the realm of science.
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    Trinity can be really hard to get in to if you are applying from the UK system, because there is no personal statement and a lot of competition for places it can become a bit of a lottery. I live in Northern Ireland, and this year at least 2people I know didn't get a place at Trinity with 4A at A-level. Obviously they had reached the points but it's just luck sometimes if you get a place. They really have nothing to judge you by other than your scores. They applied for Law and Dentistry, which are highly competitive, and you need 4As just to make the points. Although you apply about February, you don't here anything until after results, so you can't really rely on getting a place if you get the grades knowing you have a firm offer like with UCAS.
    That said, I know two people who got places on the business and french course. I think it depends on how competitive the course is, and there is definitely an element of chance. But someone has to get places, so by all means apply, just don't rely too much on it. It's easy enough to apply after you've got your ucas all sorted because the deadlines later.
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    (Original post by *sparkles*)
    Trinity can be really hard to get in to if you are applying from the UK system, because there is no personal statement and a lot of competition for places it can become a bit of a lottery. I live in Northern Ireland, and this year at least 2people I know didn't get a place at Trinity with 4A at A-level. Obviously they had reached the points but it's just luck sometimes if you get a place. They really have nothing to judge you by other than your scores. They applied for Law and Dentistry, which are highly competitive, and you need 4As just to make the points. Although you apply about February, you don't here anything until after results, so you can't really rely on getting a place if you get the grades knowing you have a firm offer like with UCAS.
    That said, I know two people who got places on the business and french course. I think it depends on how competitive the course is, and there is definitely an element of chance. But someone has to get places, so by all means apply, just don't rely too much on it. It's easy enough to apply after you've got your ucas all sorted because the deadlines later.
    this is the view im taking, i will apply through ucas to 5 universities and if i get a place at trinity that is bonus and assuming i get an offer through ucas its not really a problem whether i get in or not, not the the end of the world!
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    yeh I think that's a good plan! i don't know if you've figured out the points, but on the website somewhere there's a conversion showing the points equivalent of each a level grade, if that helps?
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    (Original post by *sparkles*)
    It's easy enough to apply after you've got your ucas all sorted because the deadlines later.
    Apply well in time, like January ! The standard closing date is very early on. It's very easy to apply ... can do it in 5 minutes with no prior knowledge... just need a credit card to pay a modest application fee (or a pen to note down address to send a postal order), and you might want to take a few minutes to decide preferences. Dead simple. If you leave it much later, a higher fee applies or it may not be possible to apply at all... AT ALL! July is most likely too late! Not like UCAS! The CAO is very strict. For student chat, look up the forum boards DOT ie
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    For student chat, look up the forum boards.ie. It has short forum histories , unlike TSR. But if you do a search in Google and put site:.board.ie along with your key words, it will come up with lots.
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    (Original post by YogiBoy)
    Apply well in time, like January ! The standard closing date is very early on. It's very easy to apply ... can do it in 5 minutes with no prior knowledge... just need a credit card to pay a modest application fee (or a pen to note down address to send a postal order), and you might want to take a few minutes to decide preferences. Dead simple. If you leave it much later, a higher fee applies or it may not be possible to apply at all... AT ALL! July is most likely too late! Not like UCAS! The CAO is very strict. For student chat, look up the forum boards DOT ie
    By after UCAS i meant Jan/Feb time! At my school, if you wanted to apply through CAO we did it in February, after the school had sorted out UCAS. Afterall I would say the vast majority of UCAS applicants apply earlier than this, and July is certainly after the original UCAS deadline, so I'm guessing that would be a bit more expensive. Also, the rest of the offers have all been given out then...
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    (Original post by Frankly Vulgar)
    Seriously? Because I'm looking at UCD too, so I'd like to know whether the Protestant/Catholic divide is a serious thing or just a bit of rivalry.
    Not at all. Bit of craic occassionally, but no, nothing serious.

    (Original post by sphee)
    im not irish so im assuming its pretty likely that i would be given first year accomodation so i am not too worried about this.
    Yeah, not really. I'd apply early. Well early. They'll help you get a room somewhere, but you're not guaranteed a college room by any means, as far as I know.

    In general, Trinity is excellent. Go for it!
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    If i'm british, is an application on top of my 5 choices with UCAS? or one of them? i'm a bit confused, also how do you apply to an irish university?
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    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    If i'm british, is an application on top of my 5 choices with UCAS? or one of them? i'm a bit confused, also how do you apply to an irish university?

    UCAS has nothing to do with Irish unis..why would it really? It is a seperate country with it's own application system. I don't understand the amount of people on here who think that a seperate country will be on the UCAS form, as if we do the same exams.

    You apply through the CAO. www.cao.ie Applications open in November and close in February. You can do a lte application but it will cost twice as much, and you cannot do a late application for medicine, nursing or art. Trinity College is the most competitive university in the country- it requires grades far beyond its equivalent universities in the UK. You WILL need 4 A-levels for almost all courses. If you have 3 it cannot really be calculated properly. You might of coruse get in on 3, but the course points would have to be lower than 500 by a good bit. We do 7 subjects or more, 6 are counted for points..maximum 600. Our grades are a lot more specific, it's actually quite difficult to equate the two systems. It's very hard for any student here, not just UK students, in case you're wondering if it's weighted against you.

    You can apply for 10 Level 8 (Honours degree) courses on the CAO. ALL courses in Trinity are 4 years or more (pharmacy, medicine are more). You don't have to fill out all 10. These MUST be in genuine order of preference- they can be any course in any university..the universities will not know, CAO does everything. If you fulfil the requirements for your first choice, you will be offered it and every course below will be struck off. So DO NOT mess the order up. Very important. If you don't fulfil the first one, they move onto your second one, and so on until you get an offer, always immediately getting rid of every course below your offer. Once you accept the offer- the uni will know of your existence and will send you out stuff. No personal statements, no grade predictions. Your CAO form will just have your info, your school, and the exams you are sitting. Our results do not come out until mid-August, offers come out 5 days afterward.

    It might seem like a strange system to you but there are only about 70,000 applicants and 7 unis here (plenty more colleges and IT's though). It works perfectly and is the fairest way possible.

    If you go onto www.tcd.ie and click prospective student, there will be a link to the prospectus. The introduction will contain information about A-Levels, and each course will list their UK requirements under the Irish ones on the appropriate course page. Your fees will be about €2000 a year, which is about £1600 or so. You need to have a foreign language until at least GCSE level. You are lucky it's not required until A-level- ALL Irish students have to present English, Irish and a third language to Leaving Cert level.
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    UCAS has nothing to do with Irish unis..why would it really? It is a seperate country with it's own application system. I don't understand the amount of people on here who think that a seperate country will be on the UCAS form, as if we do the same exams.

    You apply through the CAO. www.cao.ie Applications open in November and close in February. You can do a lte application but it will cost twice as much, and you cannot do a late application for medicine, nursing or art. Trinity College is the most competitive university in the country- it requires grades far beyond its equivalent universities in the UK. You WILL need 4 A-levels for almost all courses. If you have 3 it cannot really be calculated properly. You might of coruse get in on 3, but the course points would have to be lower than 500 by a good bit. We do 7 subjects or more, 6 are counted for points..maximum 600. Our grades are a lot more specific, it's actually quite difficult to equate the two systems. It's very hard for any student here, not just UK students, in case you're wondering if it's weighted against you.

    You can apply for 10 Level 8 (Honours degree) courses on the CAO. ALL courses in Trinity are 4 years or more (pharmacy, medicine are more). You don't have to fill out all 10. These MUST be in genuine order of preference- they can be any course in any university..the universities will not know, CAO does everything. If you fulfil the requirements for your first choice, you will be offered it and every course below will be struck off. So DO NOT mess the order up. Very important. If you don't fulfil the first one, they move onto your second one, and so on until you get an offer, always immediately getting rid of every course below your offer. Once you accept the offer- the uni will know of your existence and will send you out stuff. No personal statements, no grade predictions. Your CAO form will just have your info, your school, and the exams you are sitting. Our results do not come out until mid-August, offers come out 5 days afterward.

    It might seem like a strange system to you but there are only about 70,000 applicants and 7 unis here (plenty more colleges and IT's though). It works perfectly and is the fairest way possible.

    If you go onto www.tcd.ie and click prospective student, there will be a link to the prospectus. The introduction will contain information about A-Levels, and each course will list their UK requirements under the Irish ones on the appropriate course page. Your fees will be about €2000 a year, which is about £1600 or so. You need to have a foreign language until at least GCSE level. You are lucky it's not required until A-level- ALL Irish students have to present English, Irish and a third language to Leaving Cert level.
    thanks very much, my cousin from ireland also helped to explain it to me, but just wondering when you apply? and does it cost?
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    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    thanks very much, my cousin from ireland also helped to explain it to me, but just wondering when you apply? and does it cost?


    Between November and February- applications close Feb 1st. You can apply after but it's double the fee. Before the deadline the fee is €60-70, I forget exactly. CAO is not a government body, it's actually a tiny organisation- so that's why it costs. DO NOT apply in the last few days of January, the website always crashes with the amount of people on the servers then. So definitely have it in before the middle of January- you'll have plenty of opportunity to change courses or change the order of them after that, the important thing is to submit at all.
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    does anyone know if they count general studies as an A level in ireland? One that goes towards the points from 4 A levels
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    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    does anyone know if they count general studies as an A level in ireland? One that goes towards the points from 4 A levels


    No Trinity won't. Link here: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/

    The reasoning is because Irish schools ONLY offer traditional subjects, therefore it would be unfair. Neither will the NUI unis (Galway, Cork, UCD and Maynooth).
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    No Trinity won't. Link here: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/

    The reasoning is because Irish schools ONLY offer traditional subjects, therefore it would be unfair. Neither will the NUI unis (Galway, Cork, UCD and Maynooth).
    Okay then thanks, do you know if i would have to do 4 a levels then?
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    4 or 3 with an AS.
 
 
 

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