carxlinefxrbes_
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I've applied for these for my A-level choices in September after struggling to decide for ages. Is this a good combo, what are the career choices like, does it open a lot of door to me (that's what I'm wanting). I don't really know what I want to do in the future so hope this opens the most doors as I enjoy science and think I will enjoy English Lang (I guess it's kind of analytical like science in a way). Also as a final question, should I take four A-levels then drop to 3 or will that just be more stress on my side? ( PS I don't want to study A-level maths as I know I'll do badly in it haha ).

Any help/tips will be much appreciated!
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jayjayhilts
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Hi there!
I think you have made an excellent choice of subjects.

Realistically, you could do anything you wanted with those A levels (except engineering perhaps), you could go into medicine or natural sciences or you could go down the creative route. You have really got a mix there, whilst still managing to keep a good academic focus (all those A levels are regarded very highly as strong academic subjects - as stated by Cambridge University's list).

Unless you were going into something science/languages (niche basically) related, no job will require you to have any specific A levels, so you have made a good decision by sticking to what you like. You could go into business, management, marketing, anything really! And you can do almost any uni degree you want - most have no requirements either.

With regards to another A level - I say don't bother. I was in the same situation as you last year and I do not regret my decision to not do maths! They are beginning to stop AS levels, so you may not even get a qualification at the end of your first year and you may do a whole year of work for nothing (because on your UCAS form you can only list subjects if you have a qualification to prove you did it). If I were you, I would save yourself the extra stress. From what I've heard, Chemistry is a tricky A level and English requires a lot of work including coursework, so focus on the three and get good grades in those - don't spread yourself too thinly.

Anyway, there's my advice, up to you whether you take it or not, but know no matter what you do I'm sure it'll turn out great.

Good luck!
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Always_Confused
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I studied Physics, Chemistry, Maths and English Language at As- level and went on to Physics, Maths and English Language at A-level. I then did a degree in Physics.

English Language is a really fun interesting subject and will likely give you a bit of calm and enjoyment around the difficulty of studying 2 sciences.

Do you know what you want to do after college? Have you looked at university entry requirements and what A-levels you may need? If you're wanting to go into science, I would do mathematics also. Many science courses want the science you applied for + maths + 1 other A-level.
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by jayjayhilts)
Hi there!
I think you have made an excellent choice of subjects.

Realistically, you could do anything you wanted with those A levels (except engineering perhaps), you could go into medicine or natural sciences or you could go down the creative route. You have really got a mix there, whilst still managing to keep a good academic focus (all those A levels are regarded very highly as strong academic subjects - as stated by Cambridge University's list).

Unless you were going into something science/languages (niche basically) related, no job will require you to have any specific A levels, so you have made a good decision by sticking to what you like. You could go into business, management, marketing, anything really! And you can do almost any uni degree you want - most have no requirements either.

With regards to another A level - I say don't bother. I was in the same situation as you last year and I do not regret my decision to not do maths! They are beginning to stop AS levels, so you may not even get a qualification at the end of your first year and you may do a whole year of work for nothing (because on your UCAS form you can only list subjects if you have a qualification to prove you did it). If I were you, I would save yourself the extra stress. From what I've heard, Chemistry is a tricky A level and English requires a lot of work including coursework, so focus on the three and get good grades in those - don't spread yourself too thinly.

Anyway, there's my advice, up to you whether you take it or not, but know no matter what you do I'm sure it'll turn out great.

Good luck!
Thank you for your response, this is actually really useful! I have been debating four A-levels just in case it turned out I ended up not liking one of the three I'm taking but I know for a fact that the sixth form I'm thinking of attending do not offer AS levels anyway so there wouldn't be much of a point. The only thing I worried about was not having a core maths course or anything like that alongside my science subjects but I'm hoping I'll get taught the maths required in class anyway and that it's not too tricky haha.

Once again thanks for your advice!
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by Always_Confused)
I studied Physics, Chemistry, Maths and English Language at As- level and went on to Physics, Maths and English Language at A-level. I then did a degree in Physics.

English Language is a really fun interesting subject and will likely give you a bit of calm and enjoyment around the difficulty of studying 2 sciences.

Do you know what you want to do after college? Have you looked at university entry requirements and what A-levels you may need? If you're wanting to go into science, I would do mathematics also. Many science courses want the science you applied for + maths + 1 other A-level.
Yeah, I've been worrying a lot about not taking maths or any core maths in case I decide to go into science although a lot of uni requirements I've looked at said that whilst they prefer you to do three science or maths A-levels you can get away with doing two. (This may be with the requirement of doing some kind of maths course in your first year of study and is irrelevant for physics/engineering courses as you definitely need maths). The degrees I've been considering were centred around pharmacology/toxicology for science and journalism/creative writing/linguistics for English but once again I have no clue what I want to do and it is stressing me out a bit haha. With regards to the maths again it was really stressing me out a couple of months ago as literally everyone wanted me to study physics at A-level (it was my strongest subject) but I made the (hopefully smart) decision of not taking it as I knew it would be pretty much pointless without the maths (for any physics degrees I know you need maths) and I knew in my heart that maths A-level would be a real struggle for me especially with the already two hard science A-levels. {I also don't know if I definitely want to go into a science career}. I thought English language would also give me a break from science as I'm a mix of science and humanities for what I like haha (made choosing 10x more difficult).

Thanks for your response!
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emma543
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
I've applied for these for my A-level choices in September after struggling to decide for ages. Is this a good combo, what are the career choices like, does it open a lot of door to me (that's what I'm wanting). I don't really know what I want to do in the future so hope this opens the most doors as I enjoy science and think I will enjoy English Lang (I guess it's kind of analytical like science in a way). Also as a final question, should I take four A-levels then drop to 3 or will that just be more stress on my side? ( PS I don't want to study A-level maths as I know I'll do badly in it haha ).

Any help/tips will be much appreciated!
Hi! I began year 12 doing English Lang, Biology, Psychology, History, EPQ and Core Maths- let me tell you four A-Level subjects did not last long (the workload was way too much). I only did four to begin with as I wasn't sure which subjects I would like- I quickly found I would struggle with History as unlike a lot of people in my class I wasn't interested in politics (which there was a lot of) and I hated the teaching style for the A-Level. So really, I would only start with four if you can't decide- there is only a few people left in my year with four now- as A*A*A* is better than AAAA so stick with your three

In terms, of English Language it is the much needed break away from 'science' subjects- I wouldn't say the workload is massive- and there is no where near as much content to memorise as the sciences- the coursework is a lot but once that is out of the way your workload is alright- I was glad when it came to revising to mocks that I picked English because it meant I could focus the bulk of my revision on Psychology and Biology and then write one or two exam questions as practise and that would be it- (along with the concepts).

Your leaving your doors well and truly open with those subjects as well so I think you have made the right decision!

I also saw further down you mentioned about regretting not taking Maths or Core Maths. I love Core Maths- it's nothing like the A-Level or GCSE and it means you get to learn about everyday maths i.e. taxes. I have two lessons a week of it (it's half an A-Level) and some Unis lower your entry requirements with it.
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apolaroidofus
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My sister studies a similar combination (but English literature instead of language) and it's definitely kept her options open. Not having maths may make you less competitive for certain courses (for example, biochemistry at Oxford) but you can still be successful without it, and I'd say that those are excellent choices. You're far better to get an A/A* in English language than a C/B in maths. Good luck!
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by emma543)
Hi! I began year 12 doing English Lang, Biology, Psychology, History, EPQ and Core Maths- let me tell you four A-Level subjects did not last long (the workload was way too much). I only did four to begin with as I wasn't sure which subjects I would like- I quickly found I would struggle with History as unlike a lot of people in my class I wasn't interested in politics (which there was a lot of) and I hated the teaching style for the A-Level. So really, I would only start with four if you can't decide- there is only a few people left in my year with four now- as A*A*A* is better than AAAA so stick with your three

In terms, of English Language it is the much needed break away from 'science' subjects- I wouldn't say the workload is massive- and there is no where near as much content to memorise as the sciences- the coursework is a lot but once that is out of the way your workload is alright- I was glad when it came to revising to mocks that I picked English because it meant I could focus the bulk of my revision on Psychology and Biology and then write one or two exam questions as practise and that would be it- (along with the concepts).

Your leaving your doors well and truly open with those subjects as well so I think you have made the right decision!

I also saw further down you mentioned about regretting not taking Maths or Core Maths. I love Core Maths- it's nothing like the A-Level or GCSE and it means you get to learn about everyday maths i.e. taxes. I have two lessons a week of it (it's half an A-Level) and some Unis lower your entry requirements with it.
Yeah, that's the issue I'm facing at the moment. The sixth form I'm thinking of attending does not offer a core maths course nor AS levels so I couldn't even take maths for a year and then drop it. However, the college I was also considering does offer core maths but I don't particularly like the college (it doesn't have as good results and the sixth form offers enrichment courses once a week {DofE, EPQ etc..})). I think I'd end up taking the three A-levels and then doing the EPQ on top as that would hopefully boost my UCAS slightly and then pray that I get good enough grades at A-level that uni's would ignore my lack of core maths/maths A-level (wishful thinking I know haha). Thanks for your response!
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by apolaroidofus)
My sister studies a similar combination (but English literature instead of language) and it's definitely kept her options open. Not having maths may make you less competitive for certain courses (for example, biochemistry at Oxford) but you can still be successful without it, and I'd say that those are excellent choices. You're far better to get an A/A* in English language than a C/B in maths. Good luck!
Thank you!
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emma543
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Yeah, that's the issue I'm facing at the moment. The sixth form I'm thinking of attending does not offer a core maths course nor AS levels so I couldn't even take maths for a year and then drop it. However, the college I was also considering does offer core maths but I don't particularly like the college (it doesn't have as good results and the sixth form offers enrichment courses once a week {DofE, EPQ etc..})). I think I'd end up taking the three A-levels and then doing the EPQ on top as that would hopefully boost my UCAS slightly and then pray that I get good enough grades at A-level that uni's would ignore my lack of core maths/maths A-level (wishful thinking I know haha). Thanks for your response!
A lot of places don't offer core maths- so I wouldn't worry- EPQ lowers your entry requirements if you get an A as long as it is relevant to your degree
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apolaroidofus
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Oo just thought - not taking maths is only an issue as far as the actual content is concerned (it's helpful to have some understanding of simple calculus, logarithms etc for any science degree) so to combat this you could always try a couple of online courses? It would make the maths within science more accessible as well as being a good thing to put on your personal statement to show that you are sufficiently prepared for a large majority of the mathematical aspects the course may entail.

Imperial are running 4 virtual courses that cover A-level maths briefly and this might interest you - https://www.edx.org/course/a-level-m...8888_Skimlinks
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by apolaroidofus)
Oo just thought - not taking maths is only an issue as far as the actual content is concerned (it's helpful to have some understanding of simple calculus, logarithms etc for any science degree) so to combat this you could always try a couple of online courses? It would make the maths within science more accessible as well as being a good thing to put on your personal statement to show that you are sufficiently prepared for a large majority of the mathematical aspects the course may entail.

Imperial are running 4 virtual courses that cover A-level maths briefly and this might interest you - https://www.edx.org/course/a-level-m...8888_Skimlinks
Thank you! I might check this out (or other online courses) just so I have something to back me up! Can I just ask if you have done a course on here and what they are like? No worries if you haven't!
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apolaroidofus
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Thank you! I might check this out (or other online courses) just so I have something to back me up! Can I just ask if you have done a course on here and what they are like? No worries if you haven't!
Yeah so I'm actually doing GCSEs still (only really know about A-levels and uni because my sister's been through it all!) and I'm currently doing the maths courses on there for fun - I'm a massive maths nerd hahaha! I'll have to admit, I've not been watching the videos because I've been studying the topics in my FSMQ textbook but the questions are good practice and the bits of videos I have seen have been good. I've had a really positive experience with the courses so far and I would definitely recommend them!
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by apolaroidofus)
Yeah so I'm actually doing GCSEs still (only really know about A-levels and uni because my sister's been through it all!) and I'm currently doing the maths courses on there for fun - I'm a massive maths nerd hahaha! I'll have to admit, I've not been watching the videos because I've been studying the topics in my FSMQ textbook but the questions are good practice and the bits of videos I have seen have been good. I've had a really positive experience with the courses so far and I would definitely recommend them!
Do you know how they work? Like are there set due dates, live videos or can you just do some work whenever you want? Also how hard is the maths because I honestly do not know if I could deal with it all going straight into a level content (for reference I averaged a 6 a GCSE but was moving to a 7 with it being my lowest grade, probably because I disliked it though haha (I wish I loved it}). Thanks for your response also!
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apolaroidofus
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Do you know how they work? Like are there set due dates, live videos or can you just do some work whenever you want? Also how hard is the maths because I honestly do not know if I could deal with it all going straight into a level content (for reference I averaged a 6 a GCSE but was moving to a 7 with it being my lowest grade, probably because I disliked it though haha (I wish I loved it}). Thanks for your response also!
Okay so I think there are deadlines (but I'm not entirely sure) but they're quite long, and you can do the work whenever you want! Some of it is fairly tricky but there are probably some easier courses on there you could start off with. Some other 'stepping-stone' resources could be Mr Hegarty's transition to A-level youtube series or the CGP Headstart to A-level Maths guide
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apolaroidofus
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Do you know how they work? Like are there set due dates, live videos or can you just do some work whenever you want? Also how hard is the maths because I honestly do not know if I could deal with it all going straight into a level content (for reference I averaged a 6 a GCSE but was moving to a 7 with it being my lowest grade, probably because I disliked it though haha (I wish I loved it}). Thanks for your response also!
Okay so I think there are deadlines (but I'm not entirely sure) but they're quite long, and you can do the work whenever you want! Some of it is fairly tricky but there are probably some easier courses on there you could start off with. Some other 'stepping-stone' resources could be Mr Hegarty's transition to A-level youtube series or the CGP Headstart to A-level Maths guide But if you really dislike maths, you don't need to do any extra and you'll still be competitive with good grades in your actual A-levels (they are great, as I've already said)
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