Josh burns
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You know if we graduate from medical schools in the UK and get all the normal training is it easy for us to move to the US and get a good job as a doctor or is there a lot of challenges and extra things that needs to be done?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Josh burns)
You know if we graduate from medical schools in the UK and get all the normal training is it easy for us to move to the US and get a good job as a doctor or is there a lot of challenges and extra things that needs to be done?
Definitely the latter.

You'll need to do the USMLE test. The US medical system discriminates big time against international medical graduates.

If you are planning to work there, see if you can study there too. That's my opinion.

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6549506
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Josh burns
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(Original post by ecolier)
Definitely the latter.

You'll need to do the USMLE test. The US medical system discriminates big time against international medical graduates.

If you are planning to work there, see if you can study there too. That's my opinion.

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6549506
why is that the case?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Josh burns)
why is that the case?
I can't explain why, it's just what happens. IMGs rarely get the desired locations or specialties. I personally have no interests working there so I haven't researched into the background. It's just what I consistently hear about from people who are interested.

I mean if you wanted to be a Family Medicine physician in the rural states, absolutely. To be a big time neurosurgeon in Massachusetts General Hospital? Forget it.

The link I posted will tell you that the UK medical schools do not teach according to the USMLE curriculum either.
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artful_lounger
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Part of the reason is, as I understand, if you want a visa provided by your employer, they need to demonstrate there are no suitably qualified American applicants for that job. Hence, for competitive specialties, you would need to be more highly qualified than every single American medic applying for that residency, and then you also need to beat out all the other extremely qualified international applicants. As a result it's just...virtually impossible for those specialties, even if you ranked first in your medical school (or maybe even your country) and get top scores in the USMLE. The only option really then is to apply for residency programs that US students don't apply to in large numbers (or are mainly applied to by those with weaker backgrounds) that often have unfilled spots...which basically ends up being stuff like family medicine in rural areas.
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ecolier
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Part of the reason is, as I understand, if you want a visa provided by your employer, they need to demonstrate there are no suitably qualified American applicants for that job. Hence, for competitive specialties, you would need to be more highly qualified than every single American medic applying for that residency, and then you also need to beat out all the other extremely qualified international applicants. As a result it's just...virtually impossible for those specialties, even if you ranked first in your medical school (or maybe even your country) and get top scores in the USMLE. The only option really then is to apply for residency programs that US students don't apply to in large numbers (or are mainly applied to by those with weaker backgrounds) that often have unfilled spots...which basically ends up being stuff like family medicine in rural areas.
Well explained!

It used to be the same here... IMGs holding certain visa categories can only apply in Round 2 for some specialties.
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Josh burns
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Part of the reason is, as I understand, if you want a visa provided by your employer, they need to demonstrate there are no suitably qualified American applicants for that job. Hence, for competitive specialties, you would need to be more highly qualified than every single American medic applying for that residency, and then you also need to beat out all the other extremely qualified international applicants. As a result it's just...virtually impossible for those specialties, even if you ranked first in your medical school (or maybe even your country) and get top scores in the USMLE. The only option really then is to apply for residency programs that US students don't apply to in large numbers (or are mainly applied to by those with weaker backgrounds) that often have unfilled spots...which basically ends up being stuff like family medicine in rural areas.
oh damnn my goal was to somehow end up as a doctor in the US and there goes that lol
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ecolier
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(Original post by Josh burns)
oh damnn my goal was to somehow end up as a doctor in the US and there goes that lol
Well you still can, as we said you just have to pick your location and specialty carefully.
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Josh burns
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(Original post by ecolier)
Well explained!

It used to be the same here... IMGs holding certain visa categories can only apply in Round 2 for some specialties.
is this the case only for the US or is it the same for all these other countries like australia and canada?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Josh burns)
is this the case only for the US or is it the same for all these other countries like australia and canada?
How about asking 3, but getting one for free :lol:

Information about:
Working in NZ: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-su...in-new-zealand
Working in Canada: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-su...ctor-in-canada
Working in USA: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-su...tor-in-the-usa
Working in Aus: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-su...r-in-australia
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Josh burns)
is this the case only for the US or is it the same for all these other countries like australia and canada?
It's possibly similar in other countries but it will vary. Australia for example (at least when I last read up on it) requires you to apply to either specific specialities that they don't have enough of, or to locations that are underrepresented, and require you work a fixed amount of time in that specialty/area before you can work more widely. This is actually true of immigration to Australia generally, not just for medicine; you normally need to be in a shortage sector and/or be intending to live and work in a rural area.

The range of specialties that are "shortage" specialties is pretty large though I believe and includes a lot of otherwise often competitive specialties (e.g. I think a number of surgical specialties are included in that). The more rural areas in Australia can be...very rural though. However, the only way you can potentially work/train in a major city (e.g. Melbourne, Sydney, Perth) is to be in a shortage specialty as I understand. That is just in terms of even being able to enter the competition for it; I don't know how much more or less competitive those are otherwise.

I would note this is also the case for Australian trained medics, not just IMGs, many of whom will take on "bonded" medical places which essentially has them sign a contract requiring they work in a rural area or shortage specialty for x years after graduating, and in exchange they get the entire course and maintenance funded by government bursaries (and so don't take on any student debt). If they do break that contract they are liable to pay all those fees though...
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