Can't have weight loss surgery

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Timothy Dalton
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Hi all, I am a little depressed. I have been told by my GP that I don't qualify for the NHS weight loss surgery, as my BMI is under 40. However, I weigh 17 stone and feel as though the surgery would help me immensely. The GP said I could only have it done if I paid for it myself.

Any advice?
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
Hi all, I am a little depressed. I have been told by my GP that I don't qualify for the NHS weight loss surgery, as my BMI is under 40. However, I weigh 17 stone and feel as though the surgery would help me immensely. The GP said I could only have it done if I paid for it myself.

Any advice?
Weight loss surgery also carries risks. There is a serious chance that you might die. Have you tried dieting and exercising.
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Timothy Dalton
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Try standing up would be a great start, you fat pig.
First of all, I like to go for walks and do gardening. You are very rude and I have reported your reply.
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Timothy Dalton
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Weight loss surgery also carries risks. There is a serious chance that you might die. Have you tried dieting and exercising.
The chance of death is rare according to the NHS website. I sometimes go on walks and try to eat healthy, but there is too much junk food in my house that belongs to the other residents.
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Pathway
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Perhaps treating the depression (and if you have an eating disorder, not just disordered eating), then you might not actually need weight loss surgery.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
The chance of death is rare according to the NHS website. I sometimes go on walks and try to eat healthy, but there is too much junk food in my house that belongs to the other residents.
You are eating other peoples food?

Look, I know how hard it is to lose weight. But the threat of diabetes is too great for me to contain my weight gain any longer
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Timothy Dalton
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
You are eating other peoples food?

Look, I know how hard it is to lose weight. But the threat of diabetes is too great for me to contain my weight gain any longer
I don't steal their food, I only eat it when offered or given permission. A few of my relatives have got diabetes, so I could easily get it too. But, I want to lose weight to try and stop it from occurring.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
I don't steal their food, I only eat it when offered or given permission. A few of my relatives have got diabetes, so I could easily get it too. But, I want to lose weight to try and stop it from occurring.
Then you have a choice - you either pay for surgery or lose weight.

Quite frankly - having seen the side effects of diabetes, I think you should take your health a little bit more seriously.

Blindness, limb amputation, kidney failure, heart diseases, Alzheimers - the list goes on
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Then you have a choice - you either pay for surgery or lose weight.

Quite frankly - having seen the side effects of diabetes, I think you should take your health a little bit more seriously.

Blindness, limb amputation, kidney failure, heart diseases, Alzheimers - the list goes on
Surgery is too expensive, it cost like £4000 and I don't have that kind of money lying around. I would love to have surgery, but I believe eating healthy and exercising is my best option.
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Anonymous #2
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So I was very similar to you and weighed about 15 stone, but possibly up to 16 stone - basically I only weighed myself once I started losing weight, but my weight was 15 stone when I first checked it and weight loss is only noticeable after a drop of 10lbs, hence why I put my upper range up to 16 stone. Now I was in a similar position to you and I thought that I needed the surgery, but I really didn't and through hard work, reducing my portion sizes, and exercise, I lost weight. I actually weighed 8 stone at one point and realised this was too long so I now hover around 10 to 10 and a half stone. To lose the weight took me around 18 months and it was a very long journey full of incremental steps. I started by cutting my portion sizes and daily calorie count eating between 1200-1400 calories per day. Once weight loss started to plateau, I then added walking and running into my routine as the weight loss meant that I was able to do more exercise and feel fitter.

The downside of this is knowing when to stop with weight loss and how to come out of a diet into a normal eating cycle. I lost all the weight myself, no diet programme, no personal trainer, that was all me and I did it in secret. This meant that I didn't know how to come out of the weight loss phase properly so my dieting ended up turning into an eating disorder which I'm still dealing with today. Secondly, be prepared that weight loss will not solve all your problems. You'll be thinner and healthier, but many of the problems you're experiencing in life will still be there. Finally, you will almost certainly have loose skin so be prepared for how this makes you feel because it can make you very self-conscious. I've got some loose skin and am saving up for surgery to have it removed - I won't go to the NHS for it on the whole 'body dysmorphia' grounds because I got myself into this mess by being 15/16 stone, so it's my responsibility to fix it.

Let me know if you have any questions and I'll help the best I can, but good luck on your weight loss journey!
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username5322498
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I don't understand how you're prepared to cut yourself up but not to cut off food.

Admittedly I don't really know a lot about food addiction, but that makes no sense to me.
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black tea
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
Hi all, I am a little depressed. I have been told by my GP that I don't qualify for the NHS weight loss surgery, as my BMI is under 40. However, I weigh 17 stone and feel as though the surgery would help me immensely. The GP said I could only have it done if I paid for it myself.

Any advice?
You have 2 options if you want to lose weight:

1) Lose weight without surgery.

2) Pay for the surgery yourself.
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Roasted Potato
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The only way to reduce your weight is a calorie deficit, I am not saying calorie count to the finest point but ensure you do keep within limits for your calories and have a deficit.

If you struggle with exercise find a class you have to prepay for because then you won't want to waste your money or at least I find that useful for me. Find an exercise partner that is either in a similar position (reduce fear of judgement) or regularly goes to the gym so that they can teach you how to use the equipment and ask you to come to encourage you.

Reduce your portion sizes, ensure they are the correct size. A little psychology trick is to reduce your plate size because you eyes will tell you that you are eating a full plate of food, but that full plate on a large plate would look sparse and that your aren't eating enough. My family has pudding for lunch and dinner, You do not need pudding at lunch if you are having it!

Reduce snacking, when offered food just say no, it might hard to begin with or give yourself a snack limit, try to find healthier snacks so when someone offers you crisps and you want to say yes you say I have an alternative say grapes. Tell your friends to stop offering you food, acknowledge they are only being polite but you would like them to respect your need to be healthier and to remove that temptation.

Hidden calories are in drinks like fizzy drinks or squash, water is actually negative calories so drink more of that, the hidden calories in drinks don't fill you up, they only fill your calorie counter which is never good.

Don't be too harsh on the counting and snacking to start with, its a lifestyle change and that doesn't happen overnight, be firm but fair with yourself. Be aware you have to change at some point if you are unhappy with your current trajectory.

Good Luck
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MedicWil
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
I don't steal their food, I only eat it when offered or given permission. A few of my relatives have got diabetes, so I could easily get it too. But, I want to lose weight to try and stop it from occurring.
How much and what do you eat everyday?
Also how far do you walk, how often and how fast?
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nexttime
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(Original post by Timothy Dalton)
Hi all, I am a little depressed. I have been told by my GP that I don't qualify for the NHS weight loss surgery, as my BMI is under 40. However, I weigh 17 stone and feel as though the surgery would help me immensely. The GP said I could only have it done if I paid for it myself.

Any advice?
The evidence is all for doing weight loss surgery in cases like yours. Unfortunately, lay people have such strong views about it (as you can see from this thread) that the NHS just doesn't provide it anywhere near as much as it should.

Have you actually been tested for diabetes? The reason I ask is that the NICE guidance is to offer bariatric surgery if BMI >35, or >30 if new diagnosis diabetes. Clearly, they are not following national guidance, but they might still factor in diabetes.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by nexttime)
The evidence is all for doing weight loss surgery in cases like yours. Unfortunately, lay people have such strong views about it (as you can see from this thread) that the NHS just doesn't provide it anywhere near as much as it should.

Have you actually been tested for diabetes? The reason I ask is that the NICE guidance is to offer bariatric surgery if BMI >35, or >30 if new diagnosis diabetes. Clearly, they are not following national guidance, but they might still factor in diabetes.
But to be fair, I don't think you can blame people for their views. In their original post, OP seems to just want the surgery - there's no evidence of any desire to try to change the situation themselves, but weight loss can be achieved without surgery (as my case above proves). I think it's rather dangerous to always resort to surgery straightaway and not to encourage people to take a bit of responsibility for themselves and make the effort to lose excess weight. Admittedly, support should be offered there was well, e.g. free membership of local weight loss groups, but I think the priority should be to encourage weight loss through more natural methods instead of opting straight for the surgical option and putting one's body under the stress of surgery.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But to be fair, I don't think you can blame people for their views. In their original post, OP seems to just want the surgery - there's no evidence of any desire to try to change the situation themselves, but weight loss can be achieved without surgery (as my case above proves). I think it's rather dangerous to always resort to surgery straightaway and not to encourage people to take a bit of responsibility for themselves and make the effort to lose excess weight. Admittedly, support should be offered there was well, e.g. free membership of local weight loss groups, but I think the priority should be to encourage weight loss through more natural methods instead of opting straight for the surgical option and putting one's body under the stress of surgery.
Problem is: diets don't work. Yes there are exceptions, but the vast majority of the time, you tell a patient to lose weight, and they either don't, or they do for like 6 months then put it all back on. Doesn't matter if its just eating less, or wt loss groups, or cutting carbs, or some other fad diet - doesn't work. Then they go to on get diabetes, heart disease, need expensive medical treatment, and sign on for disability benefit. Bariatric surgery is safe, its effective, and compared to the medical treatments they'd need otherwise: cheap. Maybe even cost-saving. And life saving? Certainly.

I do believe the current guidelines do still say that you need to try NHS dieting services first though - to pick up those rare cases where people not only lose weight, but are still thin years later.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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Stop looking for shortcuts and eat in a caloric deficit.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
Stop looking for shortcuts and eat in a caloric deficit.
Sometimes it's not as easy as that. But, if the OP is serious about weight loss, they should start eating healthy foods and do more exercise.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sometimes it's not as easy as that. But, if the OP is serious about weight loss, they should start eating healthy foods and do more exercise.
Wdym its not as easy as that? It is. The human body is not exempt from the laws of thermodynamics.
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