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Student loans/ scholarship in Italy-medicine 2020

Very confused on how I pay my tuition and accommodation fees if i were to study in Italy knowing that i'm from the UK. The process really doesn't make sense to me -would really appreciate it if someone could help me out and guide me in the right direction; of the steps i should take to get a scholarship/ student loan.
Financial aid really depends upon where you end up getting assigned. For example, at my university (Pavia - I'm a UK citizen who is currently a 5th year student at Pavia on their English medicine course, nicknamed "Harvey" after William Harvey), they have fees that range from a couple hundred euros up to a maximum of 4500 - it's means-tested (you can check out more information on the website of each university, so Pavia's is http://wcm-3.unipv.it/site/en/home/fees-and-funding/fees.html and here is there official fees for 2020/21 http://wcm-3.unipv.it/site/en/home/f...ento37839.html but as I said, it can be different for each university and private universities infinitely so.

It's a bit of a process to get all the relevant documentation sorted EACH YEAR, but worth it at the end. Involves getting documents that detail:
- your house size in square metres (as well as any other property you may have)
- your family income for the preceding year
- your bank statements (specifically showing balance on 31st Dec of preceding year)
- a document detailing your "nuclear family composition" (I just do a self-certification)
- a document detailing any other assets your family has
Has to all then be signed+certified by solicitor, officially translated, legalised through the use of an "Apostille" (there's a friendly UK government department who do that, though they have reduced operations atm due to covid). Process that usually costs me around £400, but I end up paying around a 1000 euros instead of the 4500 default maximum if you declare nothing. Plus, if you submit the documentation to the correct office (at Pavia, our student scholarship office is called "EDISU") by the deadline, depending upon your score in their means-testing equations, you may also qualify for generous scholarships and canteen discounts. Sort of an, all-or-nothing based approach based on how poor you are. No other loans are provided (as the fees are considered affordable for most families up-front), no such SLC equivalent in Italy.

Hope I was helpful :smile:
Reply 2
Hi, I want to apply for 2021 entry. Do I take the IMAT this year or next year? Which universities would you say are the most competitive?
Original post by ItsYaBoiAriJ
Very confused on how I pay my tuition and accommodation fees if i were to study in Italy knowing that i'm from the UK. The process really doesn't make sense to me -would really appreciate it if someone could help me out and guide me in the right direction; of the steps i should take to get a scholarship/ student loan.

why would you go to Italy when the best medical schools are here in the UK with the opportunity to work in the NHS?
Original post by daisy543
Hi, I want to apply for 2021 entry. Do I take the IMAT this year or next year? Which universities would you say are the most competitive?

Oxbridge, Imperial, KCL, Bristol, UCL
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
Oxbridge, Imperial, KCL, Bristol, UCL

to clarify, i mean the universities in italy
I don't understand why you guys want to go to Italy when we have the best medical schools here in the UK with funding from the NHS and everything paid for, and an easy route to f1 and f2 year completion.
Original post by daisy543
Hi, I want to apply for 2021 entry. Do I take the IMAT this year or next year? Which universities would you say are the most competitive?

For 2021 entry, you would take the IMAT that is NEXT YEAR!
The IMAT exam is very rushed compared to UCAS that takes the luxury of over a year....
IMAT exam in September 2020 => results in October 2020 => course starts end of October 2020
IMAT exam in September 2021 => results in October 2021 => course starts end of October 2021
Original post by Anonymous
I don't understand why you guys want to go to Italy when we have the best medical schools here in the UK with funding from the NHS and everything paid for, and an easy route to f1 and f2 year completion.

"Best medical schools" sounds oddly nationalistic... international rankings are notoriously hard to formulate given the extreme differences and incompatibilities between different systems. Regardless, UK medical education is of course of high quality, but the issue behind "why go abroad" might have something to do with access... best case scenario, 1 in 5 applications to UK medical schools are successful. The vast majority of unsuccessful applicants are high-achieving and equally qualified with top grade A-levels. Admissions boards have to look at whether your parents could afford to let you learn the violin for years as a child, in order to be able to differentiate between such high calibre candidates. Medicine and Dentistry are the only UK courses that are capped by government. In the last 5 years, I remember reading how the DoH had in fact increased the cap to increase placement numbers on courses, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40863448 so you can imagine how before this, the situation was actually quite dire.

You'd think that the increase in course number placements I referred to above would have made a difference, but in fact it's the opposite... this is due to a policy where, in a time of successive NHS underfunding, with demand for doctors never being so high, the government continuously prefers the relatively cheaper option of going abroad to recruit already trained doctors, rather than fund enough course placement numbers at home (to meet the more than sufficient interest in such courses), as evidenced by the recent removal of the cap on non-EEA internationally trained doctors... https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/10/24/gap-number-foreign-doctors-uk-trained-doctors-doubles-year-new/

Enough politics, your final point regarding an "easier route" into FY1/FY2. In fact, its obligatory for UK medics to do the full 2 year foundation programme. Coming from abroad, you actually often have the choice between applying to FY1 (2 year course) or standalone FY2 only. Further, the process is incredibly easy for UK or EEA citizens, if they've studied at a medical school within Europe (including Italy) as their medicine degree is valid and there is no need to do the PLAB exam (at least, until Brexit comes into effect and then god knows what will happen). Applying to FY1/FY2 involves only one additional extra step, called an "eligibility application", which involves the submission of a single document with your graduation info. Smooth sailing
Original post by MrAmbitiousFool
"Best medical schools" sounds oddly nationalistic... international rankings are notoriously hard to formulate given the extreme differences and incompatibilities between different systems. Regardless, UK medical education is of course of high quality, but the issue behind "why go abroad" might have something to do with access... best case scenario, 1 in 5 applications to UK medical schools are successful. The vast majority of unsuccessful applicants are high-achieving and equally qualified with top grade A-levels. Admissions boards have to look at whether your parents could afford to let you learn the violin for years as a child, in order to be able to differentiate between such high calibre candidates. Medicine and Dentistry are the only UK courses that are capped by government. In the last 5 years, I remember reading how the DoH had in fact increased the cap to increase placement numbers on courses, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40863448 so you can imagine how before this, the situation was actually quite dire.

You'd think that the increase in course number placements I referred to above would have made a difference, but in fact it's the opposite... this is due to a policy where, in a time of successive NHS underfunding, with demand for doctors never being so high, the government continuously prefers the relatively cheaper option of going abroad to recruit already trained doctors, rather than fund enough course placement numbers at home (to meet the more than sufficient interest in such courses), as evidenced by the recent removal of the cap on non-EEA internationally trained doctors... https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/10/24/gap-number-foreign-doctors-uk-trained-doctors-doubles-year-new/

Enough politics, your final point regarding an "easier route" into FY1/FY2. In fact, its obligatory for UK medics to do the full 2 year foundation programme. Coming from abroad, you actually often have the choice between applying to FY1 (2 year course) or standalone FY2 only. Further, the process is incredibly easy for UK or EEA citizens, if they've studied at a medical school within Europe (including Italy) as their medicine degree is valid and there is no need to do the PLAB exam (at least, until Brexit comes into effect and then god knows what will happen). Applying to FY1/FY2 involves only one additional extra step, called an "eligibility application", which involves the submission of a single document with your graduation info. Smooth sailing

some ppl just have NO IDEA of how hard it can be to get into a Uk med school...
thanks for such detailed answer... and interesting point about the gov recruiting docs from other countries from the eu, does sound like much cheaper for them.
Original post by MrAmbitiousFool
Financial aid really depends upon where you end up getting assigned. For example, at my university (Pavia - I'm a UK citizen who is currently a 5th year student at Pavia on their English medicine course, nicknamed "Harvey" after William Harvey), they have fees that range from a couple hundred euros up to a maximum of 4500 - it's means-tested (you can check out more information on the website of each university, so Pavia's is http://wcm-3.unipv.it/site/en/home/fees-and-funding/fees.html and here is there official fees for 2020/21 http://wcm-3.unipv.it/site/en/home/f...ento37839.html but as I said, it can be different for each university and private universities infinitely so.

It's a bit of a process to get all the relevant documentation sorted EACH YEAR, but worth it at the end. Involves getting documents that detail:
- your house size in square metres (as well as any other property you may have)
- your family income for the preceding year
- your bank statements (specifically showing balance on 31st Dec of preceding year)
- a document detailing your "nuclear family composition" (I just do a self-certification)
- a document detailing any other assets your family has
Has to all then be signed+certified by solicitor, officially translated, legalised through the use of an "Apostille" (there's a friendly UK government department who do that, though they have reduced operations atm due to covid). Process that usually costs me around £400, but I end up paying around a 1000 euros instead of the 4500 default maximum if you declare nothing. Plus, if you submit the documentation to the correct office (at Pavia, our student scholarship office is called "EDISU") by the deadline, depending upon your score in their means-testing equations, you may also qualify for generous scholarships and canteen discounts. Sort of an, all-or-nothing based approach based on how poor you are. No other loans are provided (as the fees are considered affordable for most families up-front), no such SLC equivalent in Italy.

Hope I was helpful :smile:


Hey! I know this was a while ago, but very helpful since I'll be doing a masters in Pavia this September :smile: I was wondering if I could ask a couple of questions regarding studying there?

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