What would be a good degree to take if I want to become a medical researcher?

Watch
FreshBlaze
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
So I want to become a medical researcher/scientist. What route do I take? I'm stuck between biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and microbiology. Also, what would i do after i get the bachelors degree? Any advice?
0
reply
becausethenight
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
All of those degrees would be good options - they focus on different areas of research so it will depend what you find most interesting. Typically most research scientists will get postgraduate degrees too (Master’s/PhD).
These articles might be helpful: https://targetcareers.co.uk/career-s...qualifications, https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2011/mar/14/routes-into-medical-research-careers]https://jobs.newscientist.com/en-gb/article/how-to-make-a-career-in-medical-research-/, https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2011/mar/14/routes-into-medical-research-careers[/url]
0
reply
yeahthatonethere
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
Like the previous poster said, all are fine options for this but specialise in different aspects of medical research. Do you know what kind of things in medical research interest you (e.g. more physiology based, drug based, infectious disease based, and so on)?
Im currently going into my third year (of four, I'm on an integrated masters) of a microbiology degree if you have any question about what it's like!
1
reply
Yas031119
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
yooo i want to go into the drug side of medical research but can i do that with an undergraduate degree in pharmacy? i know pharmacology is quite different to pharm, but i want to work in the more scientific research field with a degree in pharmacy can i do that? or do i need to take a postgradute degree in something else?
Last edited by Yas031119; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 weeks ago
#5
It’s highly dependent upon what you want to actually research. The undergrad you chooses doesn’t limit you to that specific field. All the undergrads you mentioned would be a good start, then your postgrad will really determine your future career. Most medical researches will do an undergrad then an MSc/Mres and PhD. You apply for these once you have finished your undergrad, or during your last year. Postgrads tend to be far more specific than undergrads and will guide you into a career in that field
Last edited by Lewis T K; 2 weeks ago
1
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 weeks ago
#6
Also, many medical researchers come from a clinical background, so their primary degree will be in medicine, so an MBChB or MBBS (or equivalent). They then can decide if they want to go into research. Many following this route will enhance their academic profile with an MD or PhD. A good example of a career that follows this route is a surgeon-scientist
Last edited by Lewis T K; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
Yas031119
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by Lewis T K)
Also, many medical researchers come from a clinical background, so their primary degree will be in medicine, so an MBChB or MBBS (or equivalent). They then can decide if they want to go into research. Many following this route will enhance their academic profile with an MD or PhD. A good example of a career that follows this route is a surgeon-scientist
could someone come from a background of pharmacy then
0
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by Yas031119)
could someone come from a background of pharmacy then
I would imagine they could, I’m not too familiar with the MPharm course structure, but in my MSc there was one person with an MPharm and and one with a DPharm. Again I guess it would be a matter of what kind of research you go into. I would imagine drug discovery and clinical trials would be suited to a pharmacist, did you do much work with pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in your degree?
0
reply
Yas031119
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by Lewis T K)
I would imagine they could, I’m not too familiar with the MPharm course structure, but in my MSc there was one person with an MPharm and and one with a DPharm. Again I guess it would be a matter of what kind of research you go into. I would imagine drug discovery and clinical trials would be suited to a pharmacist, did you do much work with pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in your degree?
pharmacokinetics was a huge part in the Mpharm degree i would say there was some study of pharmacodynamics but more pharmkinetics in general, will that affect anything? oh and if you dont mind me asking what MSc did you do? :3
0
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 weeks ago
#10
To be honest I’m not sure, you should contact people within the industry like GSK and AstraZeneca. My MSc was in Precision Oncology and Cancer Research. So it was very much an oncology focused postgrad. We done a lot of drug discovery as well as surgical studies.
0
reply
Yas031119
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 weeks ago
#11
yeah i've looked up various universities and their postgraduate courses, they offer the masters you have studied yourself in oncology and cancer research etc.. available for people who have studied pharm for their undergraduate degree.
1
reply
biochemical.ucl
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by Yas031119)
yooo i want to go into the drug side of medical research but can i do that with an undergraduate degree in pharmacy? i know pharmacology is quite different to pharm, but i want to work in the more scientific research field with a degree in pharmacy can i do that? or do i need to take a postgradute degree in something else?
It's a really long and (I think) interesting process getting from discovering a new medicine to actually treating people with it. The discovery phase takes place in the lab, the next part is testing, then clinical trials before you come to the critical question of can you actually manufacture it? An exciting new treatment that is impossible to manufacture economically isn't a real solution at all - this is the bit where we get involved, the field of biochemical engineering. Beyond that you've got epidemiology, economics, don't forget diagnostics - that's really fascinating. Personally, I think the field of personalised or targeted healthcare is where the future lies, the idea of being able to develop a treatment for a specific group of people or even an individual, and then you've got cell and gene therapy. Sorry to chuck all this in the mix but look into this stuff as it may inspire you to something you'd not previously considered. Good luck!
1
reply
Yas031119
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
That's really interesting, i feel like a pharmacist undergraduate degree would appear most useful in the discovery of the drug and the clinical trials of it, but to get there i will need a Msc in pharmaceutical chemistry/biopharmaceutics or drug development science, so i've heard.
1
reply
ProPrep
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 week ago
#14
(Original post by FreshBlaze)
So I want to become a medical researcher/scientist. What route do I take? I'm stuck between biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and microbiology. Also, what would i do after i get the bachelors degree? Any advice?
Hi there,

Great question. Here at proprep we have a huge library of video tutorials specific for this topic and course as well as example exercises and study guides, all created by professors who have at least 10 years experience.

Right now, you get FREE unlimited access to the site, so you can actually have a look and see what each of your above options look like. Head to https://www.proprep.com/Sign-up
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How would you want Freshers' Fairs to work this year?

Completely online (9)
12%
A mix of in-person and online options (14)
18.67%
As many in-person events as is safe to do (45)
60%
I don't plan on attending a Freshers' Fair (7)
9.33%

Watched Threads

View All