Why nursing and not medicine?

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Anonymous #1
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Why do nurses have branches like adult, child and mental health but medicine not have any specific branches. I'm going to go on anon because I probably sound stupid.
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AzureCeleste
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Medicine does have specific branches but you decide which one you do once you graduate.
It's important for future doctors to get a good understand of the physiology behind all the different systems in the body and not focus on one- this is because they all intertwine and link and knowing how they effect each other is important. When they specialise later on, the foundation they learnt of the general medicine of the human body will be needed for all specialities (essentially, some parts will be more important than others).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Medicine does have specific branches but you decide which one you do once you graduate.
It's important for future doctors to get a good understand of the physiology behind all the different systems in the body and not focus on one- this is because they all intertwine and link and knowing how they effect each other is important. When they specialise later on, the foundation they learnt of the general medicine of the human body will be needed for all specialities (essentially, some parts will be more important than others).
But I mean as a junior doctor the care for children compared with adults is different. Especially their anatomy.
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AzureCeleste
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But I mean as a junior doctor the care for children compared with adults is different. Especially their anatomy.
Which is why specialisation occurs then
However as a medical student you learn how the body grows from conception through to adult hood and at what points abnormalities may arise
The anatomy that is different is very limited though as in general you are just growing and getting bigger. How the kidney works in a child is the same as an adult, care of course is different but you still need to learn the same underlying principles
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Which is why specialisation occurs then
However as a medical student you learn how the body grows from conception through to adult hood and at what points abnormalities may arise
The anatomy that is different is very limited though as in general you are just growing and getting bigger. How the kidney works in a child is the same as an adult, care of course is different but you still need to learn the same underlying principles
Why is nursing specialised from the start then?
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AzureCeleste
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Why is nursing specialised from the start then?
My knowledge on nursing itself is limited but based on my current understandings of the job it is a lot more on the caring side and more practical and following an order given (taken observations, giving medications etc.). How this is done will vary between the different types of nursing and the way it is approached. What you do with a child is different to an adult. As a child nurse you don't need to know how to do something with an adult, wherelse as the doctor there is overlaps in the underlying physiology and so you need to know both sides
Is this sort of making sense? (It's harder for me to talk about the nursing side but this is how I percieve it)
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ecolier
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(Original post by Anonymous;undefined)
Why do nurses have branches like adult, child and mental health but medicine not have any specific branches. I'm going to go on anon because I probably sound stupid.
Medicine has "specialties". They are actually way more specialised than nurse specialties - we don't just look after adults, but an organ system for adults, for example. But you can still choose to be a generalist - e.g. elderly care doctor, paediatric doctor; or you can choose to be incredibly niche - like being a paediatric cardiologist specialising in heart failure (that's a sub-specialty of a sub-specialty).

It is just that it takes years to be a specialist for doctors.

In fact, the beauty of Medicine in my view is that there is a specialty for every personality - you can choose to work in the hospital, in the community, in the helicopter(!) etc. etc. You can work in a lab, in operating theatres, in a field, in a sports stadium etc. etc.

Plus, a doctor who is tired of their specialty can always retrain in another specialty.

(Original post by Anonymous)
Why is nursing specialised from the start then?
It's not really "specialised". There are specialist nurses, advanced nurse practitioner, GP nurses etc. and they are specialised (many of them actually know more than doctors).

The thing with medicine is that the junior doctor is still training "on the job"; and that nursing training requires a lot less time than doctor training.

Therefore student nurses actually already do nursing stuff, whereas medical students may do some but there are primarily there to learn.

The medical degree is there to prepare to you be the most junior doctor; the nursing course is there to prepare you to be a general nurse.
Last edited by ecolier; 1 year ago
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But I mean as a junior doctor the care for children compared with adults is different. Especially their anatomy.
The older an adult, the more likely they are to have multiple things wrong. So a broken hip lady may well have asthma and diabetes. We have to be able to deal with them all.

When I trained.... when dinosaurs roamed the earth.... we did training placements all over the place. So I did general adult medical, general adult surgical, geriatrics ( don't call it that now), accident and emergency, theatres, paediatric, maternity, mental health and district. It was a very good training and made us more rounded than the nurses of today. It made me realise I didn't want to do paediatric nursing.... too traumatic and they bite. Or mental health nursing... too traumatic but they don't bite. Definitely not theatre nursing. Too gory and I ended up holding amputated limbs day after day.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
My knowledge on nursing itself is limited but based on my current understandings of the job it is a lot more on the caring side and more practical and following an order given (taken observations, giving medications etc.). How this is done will vary between the different types of nursing and the way it is approached. What you do with a child is different to an adult. As a child nurse you don't need to know how to do something with an adult, wherelse as the doctor there is overlaps in the underlying physiology and so you need to know both sides
Is this sort of making sense? (It's harder for me to talk about the nursing side but this is how I percieve it)
Thank you so much I get it now.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ecolier)
Medicine has "specialties". They are actually way more specialised than nurse specialties - we don't just look after adults, but an organ system for adults, for example. But you can still choose to be a generalist - e.g. elderly care doctor, paediatric doctor; or you can choose to be incredibly niche - like being a paediatric cardiologist specialising in heart failure (that's a sub-specialty of a sub-specialty).

It is just that it takes years to be a specialist for doctors.

In fact, the beauty of Medicine in my view is that there is a specialty for every personality - you can choose to work in the hospital, in the community, in the helicopter(!) etc. etc. You can work in a lab, in operating theatres, in a field, in a sports stadium etc. etc.

Plus, a doctor who is tired of their specialty can always retrain in another specialty.



It's not really "specialised". There are specialist nurses, advanced nurse practitioner, GP nurses etc. and they are specialised (many of them actually know more than doctors).

The thing with medicine is that the junior doctor is still training "on the job"; and that nursing training requires a lot less time than doctor training.

Therefore student nurses actually already do nursing stuff, whereas medical students may do some but there are primarily there to learn.

The medical degree is there to prepare to you be the most junior doctor; the nursing course is there to prepare you to be a general nurse.
Ahh thankyouu that was a very detailed response. Appreciate you taking the time out of your day to write it. I get it now. I didn't know a junior doctor was still training. Thanks again.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
The older an adult, the more likely they are to have multiple things wrong. So a broken hip lady may well have asthma and diabetes. We have to be able to deal with them all.

When I trained.... when dinosaurs roamed the earth.... we did training placements all over the place. So I did general adult medical, general adult surgical, geriatrics ( don't call it that now), accident and emergency, theatres, paediatric, maternity, mental health and district. It was a very good training and made us more rounded than the nurses of today. It made me realise I didn't want to do paediatric nursing.... too traumatic and they bite. Or mental health nursing... too traumatic but they don't bite. Definitely not theatre nursing. Too gory and I ended up holding amputated limbs day after day.
Oh I get it now Thankyou. I'd find adults more traumatising especially if their health gets worse.
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AzureCeleste
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Oh I get it now Thankyou. I'd find adults more traumatising especially if their health gets worse.
Well with adults its more their conditions tend to be complicated and they may deteriorate overtime, but it will depend on the department you are in as to the extent of that
In children nursing you may be dealing with very young children dying or having to deal with difficult conditions, its just its probably less likely they are as complex. All types of nursing are going to be hard (but rewarding)- I'd do some more research into them (if you are thinking of studying them) to get a better idea of the job.
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NurseCarol
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Why do nurses have branches like adult, child and mental health but medicine not have any specific branches. I'm going to go on anon because I probably sound stupid.
I havent started my nursing degree yet, so i dont know for sure, but I believe that "Adult, Child and Mental Health", and just the variations of nursing degree you can take, but when you get into an actual career there are many different roles you can take. You can work with x-rays, work in the surgery room, emergency room, GP etc. Also, I'm pretty sure that medicine does allow you to branch into something at some point during the degree. I might go check this
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