ira.m
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Hi so i'm currently studying chem, bio and economics + EPQ and i dont know what to do at uni.

I have looked at courses like Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Midwifery, Dental therapy (then into dentistry), Biomedicine (then go into medicine) etc..

but cant come to a conclusion as to what to do as I'm pretty sure I wont be able to get into medicine and dentistry first round, which was my original plan but now i need another one due to how my mocks went.

So if anyone can offer me advice that would be very helpful.
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fprischi
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Hello. If your ultimate goal is to enter into a Medical School, i'd say Biomedical Sciences is a good backup plan. However, look for accredited courses and possibly courses where you get some Hospital/NHS experience. Also, some Universities as part of their Biomedical courses offer support for medical school applications, sort of pathway to medicine. Uni of Essex does offer that.
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Samstrange
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Hello! Have you ever considered pharmacy? It’s very interesting and a lot of chemistry based. I’ve been doing it for 8 years and there’s never a dull day!
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ira.m
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(Original post by Samstrange)
Hello! Have you ever considered pharmacy? It’s very interesting and a lot of chemistry based. I’ve been doing it for 8 years and there’s never a dull day!
I actually have thought of that, would you mind telling me about how your day goes as a pharmacist, how is the work life, what subjects you did and what uni you went to, what experience have you done to get into pharmacy etc. Would really appreciate it

sorry for the late response
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ira.m
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(Original post by fprischi)
Hello. If your ultimate goal is to enter into a Medical School, i'd say Biomedical Sciences is a good backup plan. However, look for accredited courses and possibly courses where you get some Hospital/NHS experience. Also, some Universities as part of their Biomedical courses offer support for medical school applications, sort of pathway to medicine. Uni of Essex does offer that.
Thank you!
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Muttley79
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(Original post by ira.m)
Hi so i'm currently studying chem, bio and economics + EPQ and i dont know what to do at uni.

I have looked at courses like Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Midwifery, Dental therapy (then into dentistry), Biomedicine (then go into medicine) etc..

but cant come to a conclusion as to what to do as I'm pretty sure I wont be able to get into medicine and dentistry first round, which was my original plan but now i need another one due to how my mocks went.

So if anyone can offer me advice that would be very helpful.
You could try putting your A levels in this: https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/a-level-explorer

It might give you some other ideas
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ira.m
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(Original post by Muttley79)
You could try putting your A levels in this: https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/a-level-explorer

It might give you some other ideas
aha thank you, i actually used this at the start of year 12
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UniOfLincolnStudent
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(Original post by ira.m)
Hi so i'm currently studying chem, bio and economics + EPQ and i dont know what to do at uni.

I have looked at courses like Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Midwifery, Dental therapy (then into dentistry), Biomedicine (then go into medicine) etc..

but cant come to a conclusion as to what to do as I'm pretty sure I wont be able to get into medicine and dentistry first round, which was my original plan but now i need another one due to how my mocks went.

So if anyone can offer me advice that would be very helpful.
Hi ira.m

You still have plenty of options and it is important to take your time to do your research to make sure that you reach the right decision. Perhaps you could get onto a medicine course with a foundation year? I am actually a student rep for the University of Lincoln and we offer a medicine degree in partnership with the University of Nottingham, the entry requirements for the medicine course (with foundation year) are BBC (including chemistry and biology). Also, as a couple of others have mentioned biomedical science is another good route into medicine or you may find that after this course you want to take a slightly different route. You can chat to some of our current biomedical science students through UniBuddy. They may be able to offer you some great advice even if Lincoln is not the place for you.

Best of luck with everything,
Jack
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swanseajack1
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Swansea university offers a number of courses which can be used as a pathway to medicine including Genetics, Biochemistry and Applied Medical sciences. Would any of these be of interest

https://www.swansea.ac.uk/medicine/

They also offer many Health and Human sciences courses like Cardiac and Respiratory Physiology

https://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanandhealthsciences/
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ira.m
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(Original post by UniOfLincolnStudent)
Hi ira.m

You still have plenty of options and it is important to take your time to do your research to make sure that you reach the right decision. Perhaps you could get onto a medicine course with a foundation year? I am actually a student rep for the University of Lincoln and we offer a medicine degree in partnership with the University of Nottingham, the entry requirements for the medicine course (with foundation year) are BBC (including chemistry and biology). Also, as a couple of others have mentioned biomedical science is another good route into medicine or you may find that after this course you want to take a slightly different route. You can chat to some of our current biomedical science students through UniBuddy. They may be able to offer you some great advice even if Lincoln is not the place for you.

Best of luck with everything,
Jack
Thank you for this information. I was told that Medicine with foundation years are for students who have less of a chance to get into undergrad Medicine due to their school ranking, school abilities, things that put them at a disadvantage etc.. so i'm not really sure how they work as I go to a good school that gets good grades, but i do have some "disadvantages" i guess but im pretty sure they dont apply.
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ira.m
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
Swansea university offers a number of courses which can be used as a pathway to medicine including Genetics, Biochemistry and Applied Medical sciences. Would any of these be of interest

https://www.swansea.ac.uk/medicine/

They also offer many Health and Human sciences courses like Cardiac and Respiratory Physiology

https://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanandhealthsciences/
Thank you for this, I'm looking into it right now!
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artful_lounger
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I would start by suggesting that if you plan to go into dentistry or medicine, you shouldn't in the first instance plan to do another degree first - graduate entry medicine is more competitive than standard entry medicine (and that trend seems to be continuing and even becoming more pronounced) and there aren't many graduate entry dentistry courses and I'm not sure if they operate under the same funding model as GEM (and as such could be a lot more expensive).

Also dental therapy is an allied health profession unto itself, not an intermediate programme to continue to dentistry - that would be like training as a nurse to then do a medical degree. You can do it but...why? A lot of what you'll learn will not be directly applicable to a dental (or in the nursing example medical) degree as they have different models of care and the course will focus on different things (e.g. quite possibly less focus on the biomolecular principles of modern medicine).

If medicine (or dentistry - and you should really be getting to the point you understand the differences in the professions well enough to make an informed decision about which to pursue) is the goal, you would be better off taking a gap year and applying with your achieved grades after the fact, than doing another degree first which will make it harder to get in, much longer before you start working, and potentially be much more expensive out of pocket (and certainly cause you to accumulate much more student debt). Taking a gap year would also give you valuable time to get relevant work experience that can help you make a decision about whether medicine (or whatever) is for you, which is currently not generally available due to the coronavirus situation (although medical schools have indicated for this upcoming application cycle work experience requirements are broadly suspended to my knowledge, and they may be relaxed for the following cycle as well potentially.
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artful_lounger
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That aside, Charlotte's Web might be able to offer some advice on nursing, RegisteredBMS on biomedical sciences (particularly working as a BMS in the NHS) and ecolier on medicine. I don't know of any dentists on TSR

However I do think you need to identify what your primary aim is (be it medicine or dentistry or something else, and not a mishmash of "whatever I can get into") and then pursue that wholeheartedly (which may well entail applying in a gap year when you are in a better position to do so).
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ira.m
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I would start by suggesting that if you plan to go into dentistry or medicine, you shouldn't in the first instance plan to do another degree first - graduate entry medicine is more competitive than standard entry medicine (and that trend seems to be continuing and even becoming more pronounced) and there aren't many graduate entry dentistry courses and I'm not sure if they operate under the same funding model as GEM (and as such could be a lot more expensive).

Also dental therapy is an allied health profession unto itself, not an intermediate programme to continue to dentistry - that would be like training as a nurse to then do a medical degree. You can do it but...why? A lot of what you'll learn will not be directly applicable to a dental (or in the nursing example medical) degree as they have different models of care and the course will focus on different things (e.g. quite possibly less focus on the biomolecular principles of modern medicine).

If medicine (or dentistry - and you should really be getting to the point you understand the differences in the professions well enough to make an informed decision about which to pursue) is the goal, you would be better off taking a gap year and applying with your achieved grades after the fact, than doing another degree first which will make it harder to get in, much longer before you start working, and potentially be much more expensive out of pocket (and certainly cause you to accumulate much more student debt). Taking a gap year would also give you valuable time to get relevant work experience that can help you make a decision about whether medicine (or whatever) is for you, which is currently not generally available due to the coronavirus situation (although medical schools have indicated for this upcoming application cycle work experience requirements are broadly suspended to my knowledge, and they may be relaxed for the following cycle as well potentially.
Thank you for this information, I really appreciate it.

Medicine is something I really want to do and the more I read about it, the more exciting to me it seems but due to how everything is going and my grades slacking as I’m not putting in as much of work ethic due to it all being online, I feel as if I don’t have a chance as the unis will be looking at the grades more. As well as my anxiety increasing every time I think about applying to a medical school and sitting like a UCAT exam, and it’s just all putting a toll on me.

My biology teacher also is very harsh on grades and is probably going to predict me a C so that will just make me seem like a worse candidate for medicine.

I’m just stressed out. And thinking about a gap year would make me feel better but I have a very very harsh mother who will not like it if I take a gap year and there will be way too many arguments.
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ira.m
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
That aside, Charlotte's Web might be able to offer some advice on nursing, RegisteredBMS on biomedical sciences (particularly working as a BMS in the NHS) and ecolier on medicine. I don't know of any dentists on TSR

However I do think you need to identify what your primary aim is (be it medicine or dentistry or something else, and not a mishmash of "whatever I can get into") and then pursue that wholeheartedly (which may well entail applying in a gap year when you are in a better position to do so).
Thank you for the advice again.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ira.m)
Thank you for this information, I really appreciate it.

Medicine is something I really want to do and the more I read about it, the more exciting to me it seems but due to how everything is going and my grades slacking as I’m not putting in as much of work ethic due to it all being online, I feel as if I don’t have a chance as the unis will be looking at the grades more. As well as my anxiety increasing every time I think about applying to a medical school and sitting like a UCAT exam, and it’s just all putting a toll on me.

My biology teacher also is very harsh on grades and is probably going to predict me a C so that will just make me seem like a worse candidate for medicine.

I’m just stressed out. And thinking about a gap year would make me feel better but I have a very very harsh mother who will not like it if I take a gap year and there will be way too many arguments.
I would note universities are well aware of the disruption caused by COVID-19, and even medical schools have made some adjustments in view of it (such as the aforementioned medical work experience requirements). Although I doubt there will be massive shifts as a result I imagine many medical schools will generally try to adopt a holistic view of things more than being even more "focused on grades" than usual.

As far as your home situation I can't really advise much on that other than point out medicine is a pretty major long term commitment and there are inevitably going to be periods of great stress and potentially conflict during that (less so during the degree but when you actually become a junior doctor, juggling that with family, friends, and relationships etc, may cause friction at times) so arguments with parents is something you might need to be prepared for even if you get into medicine while applying in the next application cycle. Coping with those difficult situations (which also analogously may arise in professional contexts e.g. delivering bad news) is, as I understand, sort of part of being a doctor. It's not just learning about every metabolic pathway in the human body and seeing patients as walking petri dishes - you will need to actually manage people and their expectations. The actual doctors on TSR may disagree though (and listen to them rather than me if so ).

Something to consider though is that the application period (and overcoming the high barriers to entry) is, as I understand, one of the more stressful parts of the entire "being a doctor" thing across the career. From what I've read, that and being a junior doctor are major points of stress, but once you are actually in the degree and/or once you are well into your specialty/GP training things are a lot more manageable. So it might be helpful to think at least that while the current process is stressful (even more so due to the disruption from COVID-19), it is a peak for that and if you are successful (or if not) things will settle down for a while after the application process.
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ecolier
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
That aside, Charlotte's Web might be able to offer some advice on nursing, RegisteredBMS on biomedical sciences (particularly working as a BMS in the NHS) and ecolier on medicine. I don't know of any dentists on TSR

However I do think you need to identify what your primary aim is (be it medicine or dentistry or something else, and not a mishmash of "whatever I can get into" and then pursue that wholeheartedly (which may well entail applying in a gap year when you are in a better position to do so).
:ta: I have nothing to add.

DrTSR is a dentist who is active on TSR. They have an "Ask me anything" thread here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5937530
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ira.m
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I would note universities are well aware of the disruption caused by COVID-19, and even medical schools have made some adjustments in view of it (such as the aforementioned medical work experience requirements). Although I doubt there will be massive shifts as a result I imagine many medical schools will generally try to adopt a holistic view of things more than being even more "focused on grades" than usual.

As far as your home situation I can't really advise much on that other than point out medicine is a pretty major long term commitment and there are inevitably going to be periods of great stress and potentially conflict during that (less so during the degree but when you actually become a junior doctor, juggling that with family, friends, and relationships etc, may cause friction at times) so arguments with parents is something you might need to be prepared for even if you get into medicine while applying in the next application cycle. Coping with those difficult situations (which also analogously may arise in professional contexts e.g. delivering bad news) is, as I understand, sort of part of being a doctor. It's not just learning about every metabolic pathway in the human body and seeing patients as walking petri dishes - you will need to actually manage people and their expectations. The actual doctors on TSR may disagree though (and listen to them rather than me if so ).

Something to consider though is that the application period (and overcoming the high barriers to entry) is, as I understand, one of the more stressful parts of the entire "being a doctor" thing across the career. From what I've read, that and being a junior doctor are major points of stress, but once you are actually in the degree and/or once you are well into your specialty/GP training things are a lot more manageable. So it might be helpful to think at least that while the current process is stressful (even more so due to the disruption from COVID-19), it is a peak for that and if you are successful (or if not) things will settle down for a while after the application process.
Thank you for this, i will definitely be thinking about it more.

most of my stress is just coming to apply for it tbh because im scared im not good enough.
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