kaion76
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Hi guys, not sure if this is the best place to ask.

A bit background about myself, I am an international student and have graduated from university with an economics degree a few years ago. I understand that medicine is quite difficult for internationals in UK and GEM in my home country requires undergraduate degree in science.

I am planning to apply for medicine and biomedical science next year in UK and prepare for admissions to medicine as my third degree.

I understand it is very competitive so I want to get as many relevant experiences as possible after getting into biomedical science. I want to know if someone can shed some lights on below.

- Does anyone know if things are taught pretty much similarly with biomedical science being slightly theoretical but slower paced?
- I am also looking at subjects such as biology or biochemistry. Is it true that biomedical science covers more subjects such as anatomy / physiology / pharmacology / biochemistry / etc. and will be better preparation for MBBS?
- Would it be very difficult to get clinical research opportunities as undergraduate? I hope I can get some shadowing opportunities while working on some clinical research papers so that it would make my medical school application more competitive.

Thanks a lot guys!
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friskis
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Hello. Here below my answers, hope it helps.

- Does anyone know if things are taught pretty much similarly with biomedical science being slightly theoretical but slower paced?

Different Universities have different courses, but in general Biomedical Sciences should not be considered a medicine-like course. They cover different subjects and focus on different parts of the same subjects. For example Biomedical Sciences tend to go more into the molecular details of cell function, and less on the patient-oriented subjects. You also have more different practical experiences, with more laboratory practicals in Biomedical Sciences where you are meant to acquire basic biology, biochemistry, microbiology and molecular biology skills, which you do not always have in medicine.

- I am also looking at subjects such as biology or biochemistry. Is it true that biomedical science covers more subjects such as anatomy / physiology / pharmacology / biochemistry / etc. and will be better preparation for MBBS?

Not easy to generalise. For example, pharmacology is not a required module in accredited Biomedical Sciences courses. On the contrary, Biochemistry is probably done more extensively for Biomedical Sciences than medicine. However, for example at Essex we have Pathway to Medicine in 3rd year for Biomedical Science to help students move to Medicine after they graduate, because the transition is not automatic.

- Would it be very difficult to get clinical research opportunities as undergraduate? I hope I can get some shadowing opportunities while working on some clinical research papers so that it would make my medical school application more competitive.


Again, this varies a lot among different Universities. Clinical research opportunities are rare, and i am not aware of any specific opportunities for undergraduate students. You do not really have the time to do shadowing during the academic year, timetables are quite tightly packed. Unless you have a project supervisor on your 3rd year which is involved in a clinical research, Biomedical Sciences students do not do clinical research. Also, Biomedical Sciences and Medicine are usually different Departments and different campuses, because they require different facilities, so there are not many clinicians teaching Biomedical Sciences, hence not many chances to do clinical research. One option is the NHS placement in Biomedical Sciences, which is a 4 year course with a 1 year placement in the NHS. Placements may vary according to the hospital.
Last edited by friskis; 3 months ago
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Democracy
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(Original post by kaion76)
Hi guys, not sure if this is the best place to ask.

A bit background about myself, I am an international student and have graduated from university with an economics degree a few years ago. I understand that medicine is quite difficult for internationals in UK and GEM in my home country requires undergraduate degree in science.

I am planning to apply for medicine and biomedical science next year in UK and prepare for admissions to medicine as my third degree.

I understand it is very competitive so I want to get as many relevant experiences as possible after getting into biomedical science. I want to know if someone can shed some lights on below.

- Does anyone know if things are taught pretty much similarly with biomedical science being slightly theoretical but slower paced?
- I am also looking at subjects such as biology or biochemistry. Is it true that biomedical science covers more subjects such as anatomy / physiology / pharmacology / biochemistry / etc. and will be better preparation for MBBS?
- Would it be very difficult to get clinical research opportunities as undergraduate? I hope I can get some shadowing opportunities while working on some clinical research papers so that it would make my medical school application more competitive.

Thanks a lot guys!

Is your economics degree from a UK university? There are UK GEPs which don't require undergraduate life sciences degrees - have you checked these?

I'm sure you've considered this but the cost of a biomed degree then GEM as an international student is going to be staggering...

Biomedical sciences has very little in common with medicine (despite the similar sounding names). The anatomy you learn in a medical degree is in depth, taught over two or three years, and clinically oriented so it makes sense when you eventually go on placement and work as a doctor. Biomedical sciences anatomy doesn't come close to this in my experience. I wouldn't get too hung up on whether you do biomed or biochem - neither one really counts as "preparation for MB BS".

DOI: GEP graduate and biomed graduate (former home student).
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friskis
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(Original post by Democracy)
Is your economics degree from a UK university? There are UK GEPs which don't require undergraduate life sciences degrees - have you checked these?
Are you sure? I don't know any University in UK that would accept directly in a Medical degree someone that has finished A-level more than 4/5 years ago, with no science background.
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Democracy
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(Original post by fprischi)
Are you sure? I don't know any University in UK that would accept directly in a Medical degree someone that has finished A-level more than 4/5 years ago, with no science background.
I'm sure:

https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...ntry-medicine/
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jzdzm
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(Original post by fprischi)
Are you sure? I don't know any University in UK that would accept directly in a Medical degree someone that has finished A-level more than 4/5 years ago, with no science background.
ScotGEM, Newcastle, Warwick, Nottingham, Swansea, QMUL, Cambridge, SGUL, Southampton all accept students with any degree onto their graduate entry programmes (with various other requirements). There are also some 5 year courses you could apply to, depending on your overall stats.

I can't advise you on which unis accept international students (not all GEM courses do) or the 5 year courses - I would recommend posting in the GEM thread where people know about this stuff https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5332212
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Candiceswyip
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(Original post by friskis)
Hello. Here below my answers, hope it helps.

- Does anyone know if things are taught pretty much similarly with biomedical science being slightly theoretical but slower paced?

Different Universities have different courses, but in general Biomedical Sciences should not be considered a medicine-like course. They cover different subjects and focus on different parts of the same subjects. For example Biomedical Sciences tend to go more into the molecular details of cell function, and less on the patient-oriented subjects. You also have more different practical experiences, with more laboratory practicals in Biomedical Sciences where you are meant to acquire basic biology, biochemistry, microbiology and molecular biology skills, which you do not always have in medicine.

- I am also looking at subjects such as biology or biochemistry. Is it true that biomedical science covers more subjects such as anatomy / physiology / pharmacology / biochemistry / etc. and will be better preparation for MBBS?

Not easy to generalise. For example, pharmacology is not a required module in accredited Biomedical Sciences courses. On the contrary, Biochemistry is probably done more extensively for Biomedical Sciences than medicine. However, for example at Essex we have Pathway to Medicine in 3rd year for Biomedical Science to help students move to Medicine after they graduate, because the transition is not automatic.

- Would it be very difficult to get clinical research opportunities as undergraduate? I hope I can get some shadowing opportunities while working on some clinical research papers so that it would make my medical school application more competitive.


Again, this varies a lot among different Universities. Clinical research opportunities are rare, and i am not aware of any specific opportunities for undergraduate students. You do not really have the time to do shadowing during the academic year, timetables are quite tightly packed. Unless you have a project supervisor on your 3rd year which is involved in a clinical research, Biomedical Sciences students do not do clinical research. Also, Biomedical Sciences and Medicine are usually different Departments and different campuses, because they require different facilities, so there are not many clinicians teaching Biomedical Sciences, hence not many chances to do clinical research. One option is the NHS placement in Biomedical Sciences, which is a 4 year course with a 1 year placement in the NHS. Placements may vary according to the hospital.
I would like to know the successful rate of doing a NHS placement of Biomed in Y3 of Essex? How many students could get a placement in NHS or other industrial placement this critical year of COVID-19? NHS placement is a non~paid job, right? It's fine to me if I could get such chance to expand my knowledge if I really join the University. I haven't decided yet for going to UK for this degree but wish to understand more about the 4 yrs course with NHS placement first. Many thanks!
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friskis
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(Original post by Candiceswyip)
I would like to know the successful rate of doing a NHS placement of Biomed in Y3 of Essex? How many students could get a placement in NHS or other industrial placement this critical year of COVID-19? NHS placement is a non~paid job, right? It's fine to me if I could get such chance to expand my knowledge if I really join the University. I haven't decided yet for going to UK for this degree but wish to understand more about the 4 yrs course with NHS placement first. Many thanks!
The best person to contact to get these info is the BSc Biomedical Science Course Director https://www.essex.ac.uk/people/alsam80400/selwa-alsam
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Candiceswyip
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Thank you.
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