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    (Original post by pipkinlove)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4548226.stm

    Just wondered what you all think about this....

    Personally I saw this a lot with my A-Level Lit class, I know people will think I'm just saying this to be a t***, I'm not, but I was the only person in my class to have read a pre-21st Century novel by choice. I understand that people have completely different tastes and that Dickens etc is certainly not for everybody, but in my class of nine, six of us are doing literature degrees!

    For example with our coursework we had to read 'Birdsong', not exactly a complicated novel but I suppose fairly 'lengthy'. The two other girls who were going to really strong universities (Newcastle and Nottingham) to do English didn't even read the entire book! They explained that they couldn't be bothered because it was too long...

    How are they going to cope with 'Paradise Lost'?! :confused:
    You're the only person in your class who's read a book written before the year 2000? :confused:

    Or did you mean pre 20th century?
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    (Original post by michaelnicholson88)
    I was going to read through this thread and contribute something useful, but I couldn't be bothered.
    :laughing: :laughing: So post something useless then?
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    (Original post by michaelnicholson88)
    I was going to read through this thread and contribute something useful, but I couldn't be bothered.
    Your loss will be sorely mourned
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    I would actually love to be able to read but when I try, it doesn't matter how interesting the book is, I just get distracted by my own thoughts and don't digest anything I'm reading making it pretty pointless.
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    I find it sad that so many of my mates dont even bother to read good stuff in their spare time. I guess the whole problem lies with poor writers getting too much hype and the good ones live in relative obscurity. Anyone who's over 12 and thinks Harry Potter is a great book is "special"(and I dont mean that in a good way). As far as classical(pre-21st century) writing goes, Jane Austen is pretty simple to read and understand. I find myself taking the same amount of time to read 200 pages from both "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" and "The Mayor of Casterbridge".
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    I wonder if it's because books these days are generally shorter than ever and have much less of a point behind them. This whole post-modern craze of producing literature that defies any sense of plot and syntaxical logic is feeding a generation of readers who have the attention span of your average Big Brother contestant. Sadly, people are missing out on great writers - who have some useful philosophical points to make - such as José Saramago or Italo Calvino not because they're long - they really aren't - but because of being drip fed on pop lit. It's a shame.
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    To be honest, I don't have any reading stamina. I read about 10 pages then my mind wanders elsewhere and woosh, there go the next 5.

    Instead of moaning about a problem, why not provide a useful solution?
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    You're the only person in your class who's read a book written before the year 2000? :confused:

    Or did you mean pre 20th century?
    Yes and no, I mean as in non-children's literature, adult books.
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    too long didn't read
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    (Original post by steelmole)
    To be honest, I don't have any reading stamina. I read about 10 pages then my mind wanders elsewhere and woosh, there go the next 5.

    Instead of moaning about a problem, why not provide a useful solution?
    Because only you can provide the solution in building up your own reading stamina.

    Hopefully the Government will start ensuring that children aren't raised on extracts and actually finish books.
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    (Original post by pipkinlove)
    Your loss will be sorely mourned
    OK, piss-taking aside (I read a book on irony once, didn't get to the bit on using it as a humorous device) I agree wholeheartedly, and sorely wish I didn't fall into the bracket of those lacking in the reading stamina department (third floor, past muscle memory, beside the bins). I used to be an avid reader but I was picked on at school because I would read at breaks rather than play football. I was at a small school so this esentially meant I ended up getting alienated from everybody. This created a mental block to reading that I've never quite managed to get past- sure, I finish novels, etc, but the effort of actually starting one and seeing it to its conclusion is huge. Yet somehow, I'm reading law at uni. And bloody hell it's hardgoing! I just wish that my problems at school had been sorted out earlier so that I was able to my love of reading going, as it would have left university so much easier for me.
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    i personally enjoy classic novels less than more modern ones, but thats more to do with the content and plot than anything else. if i read a novel its because i want to be entertained, if i want something more challenging i pick up a historical biography o a popular science book. i do however agree that fewer and fewer young people read for pleasure these days, which i think is a shame because they're missing out!
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    (Original post by diamonddust)
    I'm weird in the sense that pretty much all I read are classics. I'm trying to aquire a collection but they're so expensive. I don't really enjoy modern 'literature' because I feel it just lacks depth. I don't know how, but it's just more satisfying settling down and reading Jane Eyre or Jude the Obscure than it is reading Harry Potter.
    I actually enjoy both sorts of novels pretty equally - just in different ways.

    Re: expense - as long as you're not after super-attractive copies, you can pick up bog-standard Wordsworth editions and Penguin Classics versions of most classics from Amazon and Play.com for around £2.00 a time, sometimes less.
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    (Original post by oriel historian)
    I wonder if it's because books these days are generally shorter than ever and have much less of a point behind them. This whole post-modern craze of producing literature that defies any sense of plot and syntaxical logic is feeding a generation of readers who have the attention span of your average Big Brother contestant. Sadly, people are missing out on great writers - who have some useful philosophical points to make - such as José Saramago or Italo Calvino not because they're long - they really aren't - but because of being drip fed on pop lit. It's a shame.
    That's what I mean, when I asked the girl in my class going to Newcastle, she told me that the only book that she'd read that year through choice was a Sophie Kinsella.

    'Bleak House' should provide a shock to the system lol
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    in my life ive read 8 books...(maybe 9) - that aren't work related

    7 harry potters + 'rise and fall of modern medicine' (that was for my ps)
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    (Original post by Vazzyb)
    in my life ive read 8 books...(maybe 9) - that aren't work related

    7 harry potters + 'rise and fall of modern medicine' (that was for my ps)
    lol
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    I guess some people just don't find books entertaining?
    I don't know why, the images are much more vivid to me than TV in many respects. I guess it's just too much effort. Oh well. More books for me.
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    (Original post by michaelnicholson88)
    OK, piss-taking aside (I read a book on irony once, didn't get to the bit on using it as a humorous device) I agree wholeheartedly, and sorely wish I didn't fall into the bracket of those lacking in the reading stamina department (third floor, past muscle memory, beside the bins). I used to be an avid reader but I was picked on at school because I would read at breaks rather than play football. I was at a small school so this esentially meant I ended up getting alienated from everybody. This created a mental block to reading that I've never quite managed to get past- sure, I finish novels, etc, but the effort of actually starting one and seeing it to its conclusion is huge. Yet somehow, I'm reading law at uni. And bloody hell it's hardgoing! I just wish that my problems at school had been sorted out earlier so that I was able to my love of reading going, as it would have left university so much easier for me.
    You'll probably find that Uni will sort your stamina out
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    (Original post by pipkinlove)
    That's what I mean, when I asked the girl in my class going to Newcastle, she told me that the only book that she'd read that year through choice was a Sophie Kinsella.

    'Bleak House' should provide a shock to the system lol
    Well, let's be fair you're not comparing like for like. Charles Dickens sold his 'novels' to magazines and it was in his interest to produce large-scale things that would keep him employed for a year or more. As my English teacher put it, Dickens is akin to the Victorian version of EastEnders.

    In saying people don't read the 800 page blocks like Bleak House we need to consider the original purpose of the novels and in many cases this lies (especially pre-20th century ones) in the fact that they started life as magazine serials.
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    Yep. I must have been one of the few in my Lit class who read at all for pleasure. In my high achiever's session once, my teacher went around everyone asking what book they read last. Most people's reply was either "Harry Potter" or "I don't read". These are supposed to be people who are going to Russell Group Unis.

    I'm amazed that people managed to get a grade in English Lit without reading any of the texts.
 
 
 
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