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    hI

    I really want to do Chemistry and Biology at A-level but I got a C in both at GCSE level
    Do you think it's a good idea to do them how big is the jump in these subjects from GCSE to A-level out of 10 1 being the lowest

    Any advice would be appreciated
    Thanx in advance
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    (Original post by 786Angel786)
    hI

    I really want to do Chemistry and Biology at A-level but I got a C in both at GCSE level
    Do you think it's a good idea to do them how big is the jump in these subjects from GCSE to A-level out of 10 1 being the lowest

    Any advice would be appreciated
    Thanx in advance
    Being totally honest the jump is massive however that C may not reflect your actual ability. Biology is basically just remembering a load of facts and regurgitating them. Chemistry however is very difficult. Although this is the case if you really want to do them and enjoy them you may as well give them a shot. Providing you work really hard you can come out with a good grade but to be honest if your not xcommited an a C is your actual ability then i doubt your even going to get a D. I know far to many people getting As at GCSE in these subjects who got Us at Alevel because they thought they could blag their way through
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    I took A level biology (by fluke but that's irrelevent) and after hating anything sciencey at GCSE level (yes I know what my sig says haha) I thoroughly enjoyed A level biology, really got into it did fairly well I don't think the jump is that big in biology to be honest Oh and I got a B at GCSE by the way x

    Just out of interest, what do you want to do after A levels? I ask because if you want to take something that's not biology based then I don't think you should worry about taking it, providing your other A levels support your future ideas
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    (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
    I took A level biology (by fluke but that's irrelevent) and after hating anything sciencey at GCSE level (yes I know what my sig says haha) I thoroughly enjoyed A level biology, really got into it did fairly well I don't think the jump is that big in biology to be honest Oh and I got a B at GCSE by the way x

    Just out of interest, what do you want to do after A levels? I ask because if you want to take something that's not biology based then I don't think you should worry about taking it, providing your other A levels support your future ideas
    Thanx for the replys

    I'd like to do pharmacy in the future and I think most uni's want Biology and Chemistry at A-level I do enjoy biology and only got that C due to laziness I think I could have achieved a B.
    If you could answer a few questions that'd be great:
    So how is the course structured at A-level: do you have to write essays (if so how much essays in the two years?)
    When you do practicals do you have to do a lot of written work?
    Is there alot of work in each unit?
    In the exam do you have to answer in short answers or essay questions?

    thanx
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    (Original post by Zerodos)
    Being totally honest the jump is massive however that C may not reflect your actual ability. Biology is basically just remembering a load of facts and regurgitating them. Chemistry however is very difficult. Although this is the case if you really want to do them and enjoy them you may as well give them a shot. Providing you work really hard you can come out with a good grade but to be honest if your not xcommited an a C is your actual ability then i doubt your even going to get a D. I know far to many people getting As at GCSE in these subjects who got Us at Alevel because they thought they could blag their way through
    Did you do A-level Chemistry if so what topics will I need to know thoroughly from GCSE Chemistry?

    thanx
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    Surely you could get away with just chemisrty for Pharmacy?

    I don't know btw. This is me asking :ninja:

    EDIT- UCAS profiles say they will acept Chemistry and another science, so how do you feel about doing Maths? How did the GCSE go?

    And If you start afresh at A level, and really try- there's no reason you can't leave with As.
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    (Original post by trefusis128)
    Surely you could get away with just chemisrty for Pharmacy?

    I don't know btw. This is me asking :ninja:
    As far as I know it is preffered anywayz it's best to be on the safe side
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    I know many people that only got a C at GCSE and managed to get A's at AS. It's all about your ability to do well and be preapred to work and revise. I mean my one mate only achieved the C at GCSE due to only being in school for not so long as everything got messed up but she managed her C and it wasn't cos she wasn't dedicated to working rather not enough time to achieve higher but once she started AS levels she worked her butt off and managed it.

    Some people might not just be good at sciences..I think it's personal and a personal decision to know if you're good naturally good or you're prepared to work hard to be good.
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    (Original post by malsi101)
    I know many people that only got a C at GCSE and managed to get A's at AS. It's all about your ability to do well and be preapred to work and revise. I mean my one mate only achieved the C at GCSE due to only being in school for not so long as everything got messed up but she managed her C and it wasn't cos she wasn't dedicated to working rather not enough time to achieve higher but once she started AS levels she worked her butt off and managed it.

    Some people might not just be good at sciences..I think it's personal and a personal decision to know if you're good naturally good or you're prepared to work hard to be good.
    Your absolutely right I'm gonna have to work my arse of I'm not naturally intelligent I have to work my arse of to get an A where as my sister gets A's with last minute revision:mad:
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    But anecdotal evidence doesn't really prove anything
    Not prove anything but does show people can do it.
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    (Original post by 786Angel786)
    Your absolutely right I'm gonna have to work my arse of I'm not naturally intelligent I have to work my arse of to get an A where as my sister gets A's with last minute revision:mad:

    Yeah...well just make it your number one priority and it will be all worth while.x
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    if you enjoy the subject then do it, however if your only doing them just because their considered top A-levels then i would advise against it.
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    (Original post by 786Angel786)
    Did you do A-level Chemistry if so what topics will I need to know thoroughly from GCSE Chemistry?

    thanx
    I did both Bio and Chem and A-level. What you do depends on the exam board however your GCSE knowledge wont really be that helpful as you'll go over it all again just in a hell of a lot more detail. Why not look at past papers to see what sort of stuff you'll be covering
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    I found AS biology not much harder than GCSE, nothing hard to understand but a huge amount of information to remember. Chemistry was a much bigger jump with some difficult concepts to get your head around, I really struggled to begin with but it all came together eventually. As others have said, your GCSE grade may not reflect your true ability. TBH I think if you're prepared to put the work in you're probably in a better position than A* students expecting it to be easy. Much of what you learn at AS is not covered or really over simplified at GCSE anyway. I enjoyed AS much more and found it really interesting.

    So how is the course structured at A-level: do you have to write essays (if so how much essays in the two years?)
    In biology I had to write one essay as part of the coursework, the rest of the coursework was similar to GCSE and not too lengthy. For chemistry I had to write a report which was horrid, but that was only my specification and it's changed now. It depends on your specification but I doubt you'll have to write many essays, maybe a couple for coursework.

    When you do practicals do you have to do a lot of written work?

    I didn't do many practicals in biology but no not really, except coursework where we had to write a plan, analysis and evaluation. Did lots of practicals in chemistry and usually just had to do calculations and answer some short questions, again the coursework involved writing up.

    Is there alot of work in each unit?

    Yes, but that's A levels! It's manageable though.

    In the exam do you have to answer in short answers or essay questions?
    In both bio and chem the questions were worth 1-6 marks, mainly short answers or sometimes drawing or calculations. Usually you need 1 point per mark and often need to use key word or phrases, I found it really helpful doing past papers and looking at the mark schemes to see what they're looking for, though this might be harder for you with the new specifications.
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    (Original post by Helen1991)
    I found AS biology not much harder than GCSE, nothing hard to understand but a huge amount of information to remember. Chemistry was a much bigger jump with some difficult concepts to get your head around, I really struggled to begin with but it all came together eventually. As others have said, your GCSE grade may not reflect your true ability. TBH I think if you're prepared to put the work in you're probably in a better position than A* students expecting it to be easy. Much of what you learn at AS is not covered or really over simplified at GCSE anyway. I enjoyed AS much more and found it really interesting.

    So how is the course structured at A-level: do you have to write essays (if so how much essays in the two years?)
    In biology I had to write one essay as part of the coursework, the rest of the coursework was similar to GCSE and not too lengthy. For chemistry I had to write a report which was horrid, but that was only my specification and it's changed now. It depends on your specification but I doubt you'll have to write many essays, maybe a couple for coursework.

    When you do practicals do you have to do a lot of written work?

    I didn't do many practicals in biology but no not really, except coursework where we had to write a plan, analysis and evaluation. Did lots of practicals in chemistry and usually just had to do calculations and answer some short questions, again the coursework involved writing up.

    Is there alot of work in each unit?

    Yes, but that's A levels! It's manageable though.

    In the exam do you have to answer in short answers or essay questions?
    In both bio and chem the questions were worth 1-6 marks, mainly short answers or sometimes drawing or calculations. Usually you need 1 point per mark and often need to use key word or phrases, I found it really helpful doing past papers and looking at the mark schemes to see what they're looking for, though this might be harder for you with the new specifications.

    Thanx that was really helpful
    You done really well at AS wish you all the best for A2 I'm sure you'll get straight A's
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    Just out off interest, what do you want to do when your older, careers wise? I'm thinking of doing the same A levels as you
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    (Original post by trefusis128)
    Just out off interest, what do you want to do when your older, careers wise? I'm thinking of doing the same A levels as you
    Pharmacy what do you want to do what did you get for GCSE Chem and Bio?
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    (Original post by 786Angel786)
    Pharmacy what do you want to do what did you get for GCSE Chem and Bio?
    Oh sorry, I mean to quote Helen And I'm not sure yet, was asking for Ideas
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    if you got Cs at GCSE despite revising, the you will strugge/flunk it completely...if you Got Cs because you couldn't be bothered, then yeh why not - take them, but put more effort in.
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    Chemistry will kill you if you take it at Alevel after only a C at GCSE...people in my chemistry class had gotten As and A*s at GCSE and majorly struggled.
    Biology's worth giving a go though...revision guides are handy, and make use of the vast amount of past papers available online...the students can really be told apart grade wise at Alevel Biology by the ones who've had lots of past paper practice, and those who haven't.

    In answer to your questions...

    So how is the course structured at A-level: do you have to write essays (if so how much essays in the two years?)
    Biology...essays depends on the school, i had a friend tell me they were forced to write loads of biology essays at their school, but at ours we did none (except one for year12 coursework, and then practise for synoptic at end of year 13)
    Chemistry...not really essays...there's alot of new concepts, you have to learn to stop tryig to understand why and just accept that things are, or else you cause yourself alot more greif. There's ALOT of maths involved in Alevel Chemistry, if you suck at maths, your grade will be reduced significantly.

    When you do practicals do you have to do a lot of written work?
    Biology...we did no written work for our practicals except for the coursework praticals (one in first year, one in second), and it's just writting up the experiment, evaluation etc
    Chemistry...the only practical work we did was for coursework, which we did many sets of, as you get evaluated in different areas, and they take your best scores for each area...here you have to do quite a bit of write up, all in lesson time though

    Is there alot of work in each unit?
    Biology...yes, but you will manage to stuff it all in, there's not alot of understanding, more just memorising, so isn't so bad that there's so much
    Chemistry...yes, probably slightly less that biology, but you have alot more understanding needed, so harder to learn/revise

    In the exam do you have to answer in short answers or essay questions?
    Biology...short 2-5 line answers for most of the paper, then a couple of big 6mark questions at the end (just under a page in length)...then synoptic paper(at the end of year 13) has half marks going to regular questions like in the other papers and half on an essay(morth 25? marks)
    Chemistry...pretty much all short answers, no essays, lots of calculations, although the exam papers are kind and often take you step by step...synoptic paper is multiple choice (but with evil questions!! and confusing answer options)
 
 
 

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