need advice- being open in therapy

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Anonymous #1
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hi, basically I needed some help, I've been to therapy before about a yr ago but that wasn't helping me, I'm now trying it with a different company and i started about the start of April and then got discharged because the main issue was social anxiety and this is lockdown time so didn't need it, but i wasn't being honest with other issues, and I'm starting therapy again over the phone but need advice on being open about alot of different things that aren't easy to speak about

and I speak over the phone in my room and I'm paranoid someones going to hear my conversation (siblings or parents) and this put me off starting therapy again

how do I be open and not be so paranoid when I'm talking to a therapist on the phone (btw don't really talk to my family about my mental health, find it really difficult to even speak to my mum because there's always a lot on my mind )

sorry if it's jumbled up, any advice is much appreciated x
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Pathway
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Probably start with the fact you're struggling being open with them. That's what I did. They will work with you to make you feel safe enough to be open. You don't have to spill your guts all in the first session anyway. Just be open with them insofar as you can and they will work with you.
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ejohnson957
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(Original post by Pathway)
Probably start with the fact you're struggling being open with them. That's what I did. They will work with you to make you feel safe enough to be open. You don't have to spill your guts all in the first session anyway. Just be open with them insofar as you can and they will work with you.
I'd totally second this. As someone that works in Mental Health (not providing 'therapy' like you have described, but have spoken and provided CBT sessions to clients over the phone), I think just expressing how difficult you are finding talking about what's going on for you, is a good place to start. Just like when you are getting to know a friend, it takes time to build your confidence in the other person until you feel ready to open up to them about the deeper things you've got going on.

You won't be expected to suddenly come out with everything you've got going on in your life, and things about the past, straight away. But acknowledging you are feeling on edge and are struggling with it is a great way to discuss both your expectations of the sessions, as well as the therapist's.

Best of luck with your therapy.
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Pathway
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(Original post by ejohnson957)
I'd totally second this. As someone that works in Mental Health (not providing 'therapy' like you have described, but have spoken and provided CBT sessions to clients over the phone), I think just expressing how difficult you are finding talking about what's going on for you, is a good place to start. Just like when you are getting to know a friend, it takes time to build your confidence in the other person until you feel ready to open up to them about the deeper things you've got going on.

You won't be expected to suddenly come out with everything you've got going on in your life, and things about the past, straight away. But acknowledging you are feeling on edge and are struggling with it is a great way to discuss both your expectations of the sessions, as well as the therapist's.

Best of luck with your therapy.
Yeah, I think it really helped my psychologist who was working with me when I was honest with her about this sort of thing. It's not that she didn't know but it helped to be told because then she could help me work on it with her assistance, if that makes sense?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ejohnson957)
I'd totally second this. As someone that works in Mental Health (not providing 'therapy' like you have described, but have spoken and provided CBT sessions to clients over the phone), I think just expressing how difficult you are finding talking about what's going on for you, is a good place to start. Just like when you are getting to know a friend, it takes time to build your confidence in the other person until you feel ready to open up to them about the deeper things you've got going on.

You won't be expected to suddenly come out with everything you've got going on in your life, and things about the past, straight away. But acknowledging you are feeling on edge and are struggling with it is a great way to discuss both your expectations of the sessions, as well as the therapist's.

Best of luck with your therapy.
thanks x
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Pathway)
Probably start with the fact you're struggling being open with them. That's what I did. They will work with you to make you feel safe enough to be open. You don't have to spill your guts all in the first session anyway. Just be open with them insofar as you can and they will work with you.
yeah thats true

thanks x
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