LineDash
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
I'm usually a lurker but I wanted to ask what are everybody's thoughts on the BPS? I often see it mention that you need a BPS-accredited degree to pursue a career in psychology. Makes a lot of sense given who they are but it doesn't seem like anybody talks much about them.

What do they actually do? How do they help students? Sometimes it feels like it's just about getting an accredited degree but I'm not sure what having a BPS-accredited degree really means, or even how they oversee the whole thing.
0
reply
Interrobang
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
(Original post by LineDash)
I'm usually a lurker but I wanted to ask what are everybody's thoughts on the BPS? I often see it mention that you need a BPS-accredited degree to pursue a career in psychology. Makes a lot of sense given who they are but it doesn't seem like anybody talks much about them.

What do they actually do? How do they help students? Sometimes it feels like it's just about getting an accredited degree but I'm not sure what having a BPS-accredited degree really means, or even how they oversee the whole thing.
The BPS do accreditation checks on courses every so often/when the curriculum changes. If you join as a student you can get the following benefits: https://www.bps.org.uk/join-us/membe...ent-membership

The accreditation is about exactly what you said - allowing students to pursue a career in psychology
0
reply
DeepStar
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 months ago
#3
That basically ^ And important if you want a career in the field. I know some people that did mixed degrees that were not BPS approved and they had to complete additional core modules to then be able to study further.
0
reply
bones-mccoy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 months ago
#4
BPS accredited degrees are those that meet specific standards set out by the society. Further study, i.e MSc's or doctorates, largely ask for BPS accredited undergraduate degrees as an entry requirement. Likewise, Stage 2 qualifications ask for MSc's that are accredited also.

The BPS generally becomes more important when you start doctorates, Stage 2's or working in a psychological area. The society, alongside the HCPC, has a set of practice guidelines and codes of conduct which are ethics based, and give advice on professional conduct. Once you become a BPS member, you get a monthly magazine, discounts on many titles both in print and online, discounts on workshops and training, access to events, use of society titles (I can put MBPsS after my name as a graduate member), DBS checks if on a Society qualification, and more.
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 6 months ago
0
reply
iammichealjackson
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 months ago
#5
For 90% of psychology graduates who go on to do non-psychology careers, it does not matter.

It only matters if you want to train as a clinical/educational/counselling/etc psychologist and do a doctorate.

To do research in psychology (through a PhD route) you don't need an accredited psychology degree (or a psychology degree for that matter), though you need an accredited degree to go to some BPS conferences, they're not generally that good/prestigious.
0
reply
LineDash
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#6
Thanks for the responses. I realize now what the BPS do but I'm keen to know how they help students...

It sounds like they're a thing that exists which you have to jump through but what are the benefits of being involved with them? I've seen some negative things mentioned by psychologists about them in the past (on Twitter etc).

Is it the case that my psych faculty at university will help more than the BPS (I'm considering a psych degree so just wondering how involved I could, or should be, with the BPS if I take a BPS accredited degree).
Last edited by LineDash; 6 months ago
0
reply
Interrobang
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
You don't have to register with them if you don't want to - I posted a link that has the benefits (e.g. publications, discounts) - but you don't need to be a member if you don't want to
0
reply
Lord Asriel
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 months ago
#8
As well as setting standards for undergraduate degree courses, and the requirements for full practitioner status (like clinical psychology, forensic etc) they do a lot of work behind the scenes in raising the profile of psychology in public and to the government.

They also have various outreach and education programmes such as increasing access to BAME to psychology, media training and can be helpful in developing setting up new areas of psychology. For undergraduate students the best thing they offer (apart from having a recognised degree) is the networking opportunities through their conferences and various member networks at meetings etc. Those are more likely to be practitioners rather than the academics you find at most universities, and can be helpful if you establish meaningful relationships.

I know of several former undergrads who took on formal roles within the BPS sub-networks, and used the contacts to build their career, get mentors and help in their careers. This isn't an automatic thing you get for just joining, and it requires a bit of hustle, but it's a possible way in for some and different from just applying for jobs and hoping for the best. Psychology is an insanely competitive career, and even now I still sometimes make use of the contacts I established through the various BPS events and roles I have been involved with in the past.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you don't put your camera on in online lessons, why is that?

My teacher doesn't want us to (34)
17.89%
No one else does (63)
33.16%
I'm embarrassed about my background (18)
9.47%
I feel self-conscious showing my face (66)
34.74%
We don't use a video platform (2)
1.05%
I don't have a camera (2)
1.05%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (5)
2.63%

Watched Threads

View All