Do a PgCert after already achieving a masters?

Watch
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
I completed an integrated masters course and graduated with a 2:1 in physics with theoretical physics a few years ago. Now I want a change in career (I'm not working in a physics field sadly). I'm considering working in a hospital and was thinking to do a PgCert in radiology.

is this a good idea?
do you have any similar experiences?

Thanks!
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 months ago
#2
(Original post by swag dog)
I completed an integrated masters course and graduated with a 2:1 in physics with theoretical physics a few years ago. Now I want a change in career (I'm not working in a physics field sadly). I'm considering working in a hospital and was thinking to do a PgCert in radiology.

is this a good idea?
do you have any similar experiences?

Thanks!
That sounds like a reasonable plan. You'd have to fund it yourself though.
1
reply
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#3
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
That sounds like a reasonable plan. You'd have to fund it yourself though.
There seems to be some funding options for post grads looking to move into a medicine field so that might not be too bad. But unfortunately I've just found out from the uni the PgCert, at birmingham city university, is only really for people who are already radiologists so i would have to do a Bsc first which isnt very appealing
Last edited by swag dog; 11 months ago
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
(Original post by swag dog)
There seems to be some funding options for post grads looking to move into a medicine field so that might not be too bad. But unfortunately I've just found out from the uni the PgCert, at birmingham city university, is only really for people who are already radiologists so i would have to do a Bsc first which isnt very appealing
There are some exception courses (i.e. courses which you can get funding for again), but they are usually for people that want to do a multiple-year course to retrain completely. A PgCert isn't going to qualify you to do an allied health role unfortunately.
0
reply
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#5
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
There are some exception courses (i.e. courses which you can get funding for again), but they are usually for people that want to do a multiple-year course to retrain completely. A PgCert isn't going to qualify you to do an allied health role unfortunately.
Do you think its worth it for someone in my position to do another bachelors course?
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 months ago
#6
(Original post by swag dog)
Do you think its worth it for someone in my position to do another bachelors course?
It depends on where your passion lies, and whether your financial/life situation will allow you to study an undergraduate degree again.
0
reply
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#7
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
It depends on where your passion lies, and whether your financial/life situation will allow you to study an undergraduate degree again.
Could it be seen negatively that I went to do a Bsc in such a close field when I already have a masters?
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 months ago
#8
(Original post by swag dog)
Could it be seen negatively that I went to do a Bsc in such a close field when I already have a masters?
No, because allied health is significantly different from a purely academic subject. That's why you can't go straight from a physics degree into radiography -- they are so different in terms of clinical work and perspectives.
0
reply
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#9
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
No, because allied health is significantly different from a purely academic subject. That's why you can't go straight from a physics degree into radiography -- they are so different in terms of clinical work and perspectives.
Do you think my Msc would give me a significant advantage if i was to go through and complete a Bachelors or would I still be on the same footing as someone who only pursued radiography from the beginning (during the course and professionally after completing it)?
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 months ago
#10
(Original post by swag dog)
Do you think my Msc would give me a significant advantage if i was to go through and complete a Bachelors or would I still be on the same footing as someone who only pursued radiography from the beginning (during the course and professionally after completing it)?
In terms of getting a job as a radiologist? No, it's an entirely different job with a different focus on skill sets, unless as a physicist you were fixing radiology machines. An MSc an academic qualification and radiology is a healthcare role - OK, a technical one, but the technical training required is contained in the training for qualification.
0
reply
swag dog
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#11
(Original post by threeportdrift)
In terms of getting a job as a radiologist? No, it's an entirely different job with a different focus on skill sets, unless as a physicist you were fixing radiology machines. An MSc an academic qualification and radiology is a healthcare role - OK, a technical one, but the technical training required is contained in the training for qualification.
Thank you!

I take it I also need to complete the course to find a career fixing the machines? or is there a better way to pursue that?
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 months ago
#12
(Original post by swag dog)
Thank you!

I take it I also need to complete the course to find a career fixing the machines? or is there a better way to pursue that?
Not my area, but I was talking to an ITU Director the other day and she was mentioning how the teams required to keep intensive care beds running included not only all the doctors and nurses, physios, administrators etc, but also the engineers to keep the machines running.

The are vital pieces of equipment that have to work reliably, there must be some technical interface between the manufacturer and the user.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should the school day be extended to help students catch up?

Yes (94)
27.81%
No (244)
72.19%

Watched Threads

View All