Strach2k
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Im unsure what degree to go for at the moment its out if biology or educational studies... I like the thought of learning all the sciences etc but how much maths is involved? As its really not my steong point.. Although i know enough to get around... I hope....
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FRS500
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If you're doing Natural Sciences (Biology) Q64 - You don't have any compulsory mathematics modules.

HOWEVER, at stage 2 you have an optional module and can take Mathematical Modelling (MST224) as a 30 credit module. (You need to make up 60 credits in total of options)

I don't have experience of that module in particular (not for a year or so yet) but I have experience of other OU maths courses, they're taught very well and the M&S community is really helpful

Can read more about the module here.
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Strach2k
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(Original post by FRS500)
If you're doing Natural Sciences (Biology) Q64 - You don't have any compulsory mathematics modules.

HOWEVER, at stage 2 you have an optional module and can take Mathematical Modelling (MST224) as a 30 credit module. (You need to make up 60 credits in total of options)

I don't have experience of that module in particular (not for a year or so yet) but I have experience of other OU maths courses, they're taught very well and the M&S community is really helpful

Can read more about the module here.
What's the differences in natural sciences (biology) and bsc biology? Im not test at maths just finished doing foundstion gcse maths do i wouldnt want that to hamper me..
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FRS500
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(Original post by Strach2k)
What's the differences in natural sciences (biology) and bsc biology? Im not test at maths just finished doing foundstion gcse maths do i wouldnt want that to hamper me..
I didn't even know we did BSc Biology tbh until literally now! I always knew we had Natural Sciences BSc (which you could do in Biology).

Haven't a clue as to the differences, it seems a bit more biology orientated/ no scope to squeeze in the maths module.

Naturally, you'd need to have *some* understanding of basic numerical concepts to get by but you should be fine.

It's defo not a maths intensive degree if that is what you are asking? Neither are
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GabiAbi84
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The straight biology degree is new for the OU. There’s no real difference in the validity of the degree but you will find that doing the natural science on the biology pathway will give you more module options along the way that will interest you more.
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GabiAbi84
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If you are going into primary teaching it may be that the natural science could be better as you could veer from straight biology and do some physics/chemistry/maths that could help you
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Strach2k
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Yeah i do understand maths to function lol... Ahh ok so if the natural science (biology) degree is more choice, why have they made the standard one? Just to confuse me lol.. Seems to me like a fun to learn degree constantly differing subjects and valuable knowledge just dont want to bite off more than i can chew.. Especially with the maths
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GabiAbi84
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A third option would be to do the combined stem degree in the biology route-that would allow you to take some education modules along with biology.
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by Strach2k)
Yeah i do understand maths to function lol... Ahh ok so if the natural science (biology) degree is more choice, why have they made the standard one? Just to confuse me lol.. Seems to me like a fun to learn degree constantly differing subjects and valuable knowledge just dont want to bite off more than i can chew.. Especially with the maths
Certain career pathways after degree suit more to having a straight biology name. And the natural science(biology) didn’t use to have accreditation-now that they have developed their straight degrees (biology/chemistry/physics) they are all accredited and that accreditation has been awarded to the natural science if you follow set routes.
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Strach2k
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So i wouldnt get an option not to follow the set route? Obviously i would want accreditation with which ever degree i choose, i get the feeling if i do a xombined stem its not really studying a subject to its full potential...
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Strach2k)
So i wouldnt get an option not to follow the set route? Obviously i would want accreditation with which ever degree i choose, i get the feeling if i do a xombined stem its not really studying a subject to its full potential...
Don't get too caught up on degree titles at university...especially for what your planning. Your undergrad content has waaaaay more significance for postgrad study, then it does on the job market.
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by Strach2k)
So i wouldnt get an option not to follow the set route? Obviously i would want accreditation with which ever degree i choose, i get the feeling if i do a xombined stem its not really studying a subject to its full potential...
It really depends what you want out of the degree. If your aim is primary teaching then accreditation is not necessary and you may find that learning about children’s mental health, or teaching the primary years would benefit you more. Since you wouldn’t need a named degree to go into primary teaching you could follow the biology route stem which basically gives you half of the biology degree and an option to do half an education degree. It’s not that you wouldn’t study to it’s full potential, but more that you would concentrate more on the main pathways.
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Strach2k
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So if i do choose the stem degree would i study all the biology modules first then education second or can i literally pick and choose as i feel like it? It seems so varied don't want to sign up to it if there's no actual dedicated degree at the end.. If that makes sense?
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GabiAbi84
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The combined stem on the biology rout would see you doing a level 1, level two and level 3 biology so you would be doing it all the way through. You then can choose whatever you would like as the other half of each level.
A combined stem, or an open degree is a dedicated degree-they just don’t always suit the next stages. It doesn’t make them less of a degree-in fact if you do go into teaching it makes it more of one as you have a more diverse education with it.

The link to the combined stem is here: if you scroll down there is a bit that says routes through the degree -the first of which is biology.
http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...em?setAcc=true
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Strach2k
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Yeah ive seen the page and its mainly biology based and then other varied choices of modules... Also completely off the topic if i chose to do a degree in say criminology and psychology would i still be able to get on a pcge course once completing the degree? As these subjects also interest me
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by Strach2k)
Yeah ive seen the page and its mainly biology based and then other varied choices of modules... Also completely off the topic if i chose to do a degree in say criminology and psychology would i still be able to get on a pcge course once completing the degree? As these subjects also interest me
It would still count as your undergrad degree so yes would still make you eligible for the pgce however for primary teaching you need GCSEs in maths English and science and I think you didn’t have science?
So if you followed that path you would need to pick up science qualification along the way.
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Strach2k
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Yeah your right. Just someone said to get on the pcge part of your degree would need to be specific to it? To get on it? Yeah hoping to get English and maths in august or resits in n Nov but if i do biology i wouldnt need science gcse to teach primary?
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GabiAbi84
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It depends on where you are applying, some need a relevant degree, but psychology would tend to fall under that also. It would just be what you thought would be better for yourself.
As for the science GCSEs it would again depend on where you would be applying- some will have no wiggle room, so will accept the biology degree, and some may ask you to take a test to prove you have the ability/knowledge.

I’d advise looking at the universities around you and get an idea on there entry requirements for the primary pgce.
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Strach2k
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So psychology could be relevant and a route into teaching? Alongside criminology??? 😮
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Strach2k
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Entry requirements
You should typically meet the following criteria:

An undergraduate degree, or a recognised equivalent qualification. This is typically 2:2 or higher but we will look at all applications against the demands of the course.
GCSE grade C/4 in English Language, Mathematics and Science, or equivalent. We do not accept Level 2 Key Skills, Functional Skills or Certificates in Adult Numeracy and Literacy as alternatives to GCSEs.
Our PGCE courses include a high level of placement based learning and working with children. We would encourage all applicants to get as much relevant experience of working or volunteering with children to help prepare them for this crucial element of their course.

Applicants who do not meet the minimum academic entry requirements, but have significant life and/or work experience will be considered on an individual basis.


So judging by that as long as i have a 2:2 min degree in any subject there's a chance I'll get on the course
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