Extramural and Intramural glands

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Kalabamboo
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#1
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#1
I don't think I understand the concept of extramural/intramural glands well enough and would really like some help please.

This is my understanding so far (not sure if it's accurate though): Please feel free to correct me! I also have a question (see further down).

Both intramural glands and extramural glands are exocrine glands.

Intramural glands are part of the gastrointestinal tube so they are either in the mucosa or the submucosa of the wall of the gastrointestinal tube. Gatrointestinal tube or tract is from the oesophagus to the anus.

Extramural glands are outside the gastrointestinal tube.

However, what does the attachment below mean? I got confused when they mentioned the duct here "Duct from gland linked externally from hollow organ" :/
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Also, in the attachment below,..It says "Intramural glands are sparsely distributed within the ductal wall" and "Extramural glands are located outside the ductal wall". Why are they saying "ductal wall"? Shouldn't it be the wall of the gastrointestinal tube? An exocrine gland has an opening for a duct,...therefore, it doesn't make sense how the wall of a duct can have exocrine glands in it.
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Last edited by Kalabamboo; 2 years ago
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Kalabamboo
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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#3
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#3
Hi just saw your post - sorry you have not had any response yet! :mad: - let me gobble my oily fish to provide me with a good dose of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, and I shall then attempt to help you out.

M
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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#4
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Hi again!

Now that I have had some nutrition, I will have a shot at your Q.

My first observation would be that, in general, try and look at medical terminology from the viewpoint of its component syllables and their Greek/Latin roots, as well as examine other similar words to work out the meaning, and the logic behind it.

I am sure you are aware that "intra-" means inside or within, and "extra-" = outside; "mural" refers to something to do with a wall e.g. taking cardiology for a moment, there is a clear distinction between sub-endocardial ischaemia [ONLY below the endocardium] and transmural ischaemia [spanning the entire myocardial wall - "trans" means across as in trans-Atlantic flights][the ECG appearances are also different - you are welcome to ask me when you do your cardiology firm]. Another example is aortic intramural haemorrhage [IMH], which needs to be distinguished from aortic dissection. IMH involves blood within a split in the arterial tunica media.

Having looked at the origins and examples of these terms, you might already be predicting that intramural "glands" are those within a wall [in your example, the biliary ductal wall], whereas extradural glands are those completely outside such a conduit.

If you need further detail or more examples, do feel free to PM me.

Thanks!
M
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Kalabamboo
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#5
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi again!

Now that I have had some nutrition, I will have a shot at your Q.

My first observation would be that, in general, try and look at medical terminology from the viewpoint of its component syllables and their Greek/Latin roots, as well as examine other similar words to work out the meaning, and the logic behind it.

I am sure you are aware that "intra-" means inside or within, and "extra-" = outside; "mural" refers to something to do with a wall e.g. taking cardiology for a moment, there is a clear distinction between sub-endocardial ischaemia [ONLY below the endocardium] and transmural ischaemia [spanning the entire myocardial wall - "trans" means across as in trans-Atlantic flights][the ECG appearances are also different - you are welcome to ask me when you do your cardiology firm]. Another example is aortic intramural haemorrhage [IMH], which needs to be distinguished from aortic dissection. IMH involves blood within a split in the arterial tunica media.

Having looked at the origins and examples of these terms, you might already be predicting that intramural "glands" are those within a wall [in your example, the biliary ductal wall], whereas extradural glands are those completely outside such a conduit.

If you need further detail or more examples, do feel free to PM me.

Thanks!
M
Hi macpatgh-Sheldon,

Thanks a lot!! This helped me understand more I think I was overthinking a bit haha. So I understand from your detailed reply back that intramural means inside a wall but extramural means outside it. The examples you provided helped loads.

Sorry to bother again but I am still a bit stuck on this "What are extramural glands? - Duct from gland linked externally from hollow organ" in my initial post. The wording of the bold bit is confusing me. What do you think about this?

Thanks a lot again You are always helpful!
Last edited by Kalabamboo; 2 years ago
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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#6
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#6
Hi again,
"DUCT from gland linked externally from hollow organ"

Taking one of your own examples, namely the submandibular salivary gland, it has a link to the hollow organ [the buccal cavity = mouth] from outside this cavity [externally] i.e. from the digastric triangle [where the gland is located]; the link is via the the 5 cm long submandibular DUCT, which opens into the mouth near the frenulum of the tongue.

Incidentally, in your examples [below the bold text in your last post [the one to which I am now replying]], "gallbladder" is strictly speaking incorrect, as it IS NOT A GLAND [it simply STORES bile secreted by the liver].

Hope this helps!
M
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Kalabamboo
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#7
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi again,
"DUCT from gland linked externally from hollow organ"

Taking one of your own examples, namely the submandibular salivary gland, it has a link to the hollow organ [the buccal cavity = mouth] from outside this cavity [externally] i.e. from the digastric triangle [where the gland is located]; the link is via the the 5 cm long submandibular DUCT, which opens into the mouth near the frenulum of the tongue.

Incidentally, in your examples [below the bold text in your last post [the one to which I am now replying]], "gallbladder" is strictly speaking incorrect, as it IS NOT A GLAND [it simply STORES bile secreted by the liver].

Hope this helps!
M
Ah yes! Brilliant, I got that Thanks a lot! Some sources incorrectly mention that the gall bladder is a gland which is incorrect so thank you for letting me know.
Please feel free to ignore me if I annoy you

In my initial post, I said "Both intramural glands and extramural glands are exocrine glands". Is that correct and why is that the case? I am trying to see the difference between endocrine and exocrine glands here. So can endocrine glands be either intramural or extramural?

Thanks a million for your patience with my rather depressing questions haha.
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