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    well, i've looked far and wide for such statistics - but, no luck.

    so, what colleges are thought to be the ones who tend to accept higher proportions of state school pupils (if any)?
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    Kings College. They accept the highest percentage (I think).

    However if your applying as a state school student it doesn't make a difference. The numbers in Kings are only higher because it is the most well known of the cambridge colleges as far as the general public is concerned. More in the state sector will have heard of it so more will apply to it.

    Plus it has a beautiful chapel.
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    oh, yes, i've seen that chapel!

    my head of year was saying to me today that applying's a 'war' and choosing a college which accepts more state school pupils (due to them wanting to boost their state-sector intake) would give me a greater chance than in ones with a lower proportion of them, who might expect me to have things not available to me as a state school pupil. a lot of piffle?
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    (Original post by boysenberry)
    a lot of piffle?
    Yes.

    Do not listen to your head of year if that's the kind of rubbish he's spouting.

    All colleges take people from state schools. If you have a strong application (i.e. the same as most people), go for whichever college you like the look of, not one you think might be scouting for state-schooled students. None of them are scouting for state-schooled students, specifically.

    The state-private problem is caused FAR more by not enough state schoolers applying, NOT by any kind of prejudice (now, anyway -- can't say it was the same 61 years ago. Still, 61 years ago, women still couldn't get degrees from the University, so...You get the picture).

    Apply with confidence, if that's what your academic profile suggests. Your admission or rejection will have absolutely nothing to do with the type of school you go to.

    (Indeed, one of the reasons Cambridge is so frequently lambasted by the media and government is because it has refused to fulfil school-based targets, because it knows applications are made of more than school type. Take heart from this, not concern).
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    (Original post by epitome)
    Yes.

    Do not listen to your head of year if that's the kind of rubbish he's spouting.

    All colleges take people from state schools. If you have a strong application (i.e. the same as most people), go for whichever college you like the look of, not one you think might be scouting for state-schooled students. None of them are scouting for state-schooled students, specifically.
    thanks, epitome glad i've got some proper advice on the subject.

    i was tempted just to shoot her down today and say a simple 'naw', but i let her on her rant on how we state schools have supposedly got it super-hard when it comes to oxbridge. it might be fair to say that we're a tad disadvantaged (when it comes to the all-round, secndary school life), but definitely not hugely, i reckon.

    i think i'm just going to go for trinity college. although, not having visited there might not be too good...
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    (Original post by boysenberry)
    i was tempted just to shoot her down today and say a simple 'naw', but i let her on her rant on how we state schools have supposedly got it super-hard when it comes to oxbridge. it might be fair to say that we're a tad disadvantaged (when it comes to the all-round, secndary school life), but definitely not hugely, i reckon.

    i think i'm just going to go for trinity college. although, not having visited there might not be too good...
    She is definitely talking through her hat. State schooled students do not have it "super-hard". According to the number of state vs. fee-paying schools in the country, proportionately more (by far) fee-paying students get offers. This is because a disproportionately large number of them apply. State school students are also done a gross disservice by people such as your head of year, who fill the air with myth, speculation and bad-feeling and put people off.

    Admissions tutors are fully awware of the potential difference between the facilities and opportunities of state vs. private schools (facilities which are not always much different, of course). They're aware of the difference in class sizes, and in educational aspiration/pressure.

    As for colleges...it's REALLY a good idea to visit if you can. If you live in Glasgow it's a bit of a schlep, but I'd say it's worth it if you can find a way. Sometimes a college just feels 'right' or 'wrong', and that can be quite a good indicator/enthuser. But if Trinity looks good to you, go for it! There's many a person who'd agree with you!
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    Kings, Churchill, Robinson, the girl colleges, Fitzwilliam, Selwyn all take quite a lot of state school students. The least are the traditional ones like St Johns, Gonville and Caius etc.


    - but as has alrady been mentioned this means very little in the modern context.
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    thanks, guys. thank god those myths have been dispelled once and for all (well, for me at least )
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    (Original post by epitome)
    As for colleges...it's REALLY a good idea to visit if you can. If you live in Glasgow it's a bit of a schlep, but I'd say it's worth it if you can find a way. Sometimes a college just feels 'right' or 'wrong', and that can be quite a good indicator/enthuser. But if Trinity looks good to you, go for it! There's many a person who'd agree with you!
    I certainly would've, if it hadn't of been for my brother's wedding falling on the same day! and, yeah, it is a fair trek down to cambridge (from what i hear) so even going down for interviews (well, i bloody hope so) won't be so easy. and, the only time when i could go down is in our october holidays: pretty much the same time as when applications have to go in - damn.
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    (Original post by boysenberry)
    I certainly would've, if it hadn't of been for my brother's wedding falling on the same day! and, yeah, it is a fair trek down to cambridge (from what i hear) so even going down for interviews (well, i bloody hope so) won't be so easy. and, the only time when i could go down is in our october holidays: pretty much the same time as when applications have to go in - damn.
    One of my friends comes from Glasgow, so I get to hear all about the journey every time. It's not tooo bad, though, if you take a book and/or ipod (as well as a sense of humour).

    Good luck with it all, anyway!
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    (Original post by epitome)
    One of my friends comes from Glasgow, so I get to hear all about the journey every time. It's not tooo bad, though, if you take a book and/or ipod (as well as a sense of humour).

    Good luck with it all, anyway!
    Yeah, i'll be sure to. thanks for your help!
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    While of course you must not, as the other contributors rightly say, become too concerned with admissions statistics, perhaps the crucial measure is not the percentage of state school students at a given college but this number compared with the number of state school applicants - i.e. the percentage of state school students who are accepted, compared with the percentage of private school pupils. This adjusts for discrepancies such as disproportionately large numbers of state school pupils applying (an oddity that is relevant to King's), and vice versa. The information is in fact available here:

    http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/reporter/...4/table5_1.pdf

    The results are fascinating... Across the two years, by this measure, the college with the most progressive admissions policy is, ironically, not Kings but Peterhouse (though differences are small).
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    Homerton is listed as having around 90% state school intake in the alternative prospectus, but I expect it's probably more around 80-85% now. But this is my College so it's the only one I really know much about. I would imagine, though do not know for sure, that Girton, Robinson, Fitzwilliam and Murray Edwards may be similar.
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    (Original post by Jacobite)
    http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/reporter/...4/table5_1.pdf

    The results are fascinating... Across the two years, by this measure, the college with the most progressive admissions policy is, ironically, not Kings but Peterhouse (though differences are small).
    yeah, that is quite interesting, actually. i've had trinity in mind, and even with it having some of the lowest proportions of state-sector intake, i don't see it as much of a problem.
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    (Original post by boysenberry)
    yeah, that is quite interesting, actually. i've had trinity in mind, and even with it having some of the lowest proportions of state-sector intake, i don't see it as much of a problem.
    It isn't... I was told similar things to you about how I should apply to a newer/further from the centre/girls' (in my case) college because people from my school didn't get in to the older colleges. I ignored it, and I'm at Trinity now anyway. I'd just echo what epitome said, apply to the college you want to go to regardless, ignore advice about picking an 'easy' college. Sometimes I wonder if Cambridge would be better off trying to target the attitudes of teachers towards applying rather than those of students, I think it does make a big difference - in some private schools it's the norm to apply, teachers are used to it, whereas a state school might only have a couple of students applying per year.
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    (Original post by *Liana*)
    Sometimes I wonder if Cambridge would be better off trying to target the attitudes of teachers towards applying rather than those of students
    We do try, but it's very difficult to get them to listen. Most colleges hold days specifically for teachers. I've been to some of them and it's a real battle -- they very often think the colleges are lying to them, or hiding some secret agenda. It's infuriating.
    All schools are sent information every year. Some respond, and are looking for more guidance. These we can help. If people choose to ignore everything offered, though, there's little we can do.

    Ironically (and frustratingly), sometimes the biggest problems are people who went to Oxbridge once. People who *think* they know all about the system but don't. *headdesk*

    If you have any bright ideas as to how we can get the damned message across, please PM me or get in touch with Charlotte Richer, CUSU's Access Officer. Really.
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    And what is more (to throw a bit of a spanner in there) is that colleges which have a high proportion of their students come from state schools are not necessarily the ones which have the highest proportion of state school applicants succesful (which is the important figure).

    But the stuff mentioned above is far far more important, listen to them and not me.
 
 
 
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