Linda2013
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Hi my friend has been caught speeding he did a speed awareness course 3 years ago and currently has a clean licence. He’s had a letter today to say he’s been caught doing 96mph in a 60 any idea what penalty hes looking at? Or anyone been in same situation? Thanks
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Bexjw
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Doing 36mph over the speed limit is completely reckless and with a previous speeding conviction, he deserves everything he gets.

“Band C - you will be put in this band if you were 21mph or more over the legal limit. You may need to appear in court and face a fine anywhere between 125% and 175% of your weekly income. You will be banned from driving for seven to 56 days or get six penalty points on your licence.”

He has to be aware that certain factors can make it worse e.g. the fact he’s previously been caught speeding, if he had passengers in the car, if the road conditions were poor and if he was in an area of high traffic and/or pedestrians. This will likely result in a harsher punishment.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Bexjw)
Doing 36mph over the speed limit is completely reckless
You can't justify that - it may or may not be, depending upon a number of factors. Speed limits are often arbitrary. I base my judgement of a safe speed on several factors, some major ones being whether there is pedestrian access, traffic level, dual carriageway and road / weather conditions. I do not speed in residential areas, but, on motorways, most people do, yet they are still the safest road, per mile.

I know several dual carriage way roads with limits from 50mph, where, with suitable conditions, very high speeds (120mph+) would be safe. Many roads have had limits reduced over the past decades, despite cars being much, much, more capable. A car from the '70s is shocking in almost every respect (e.g. braking, road holding, aerodynamic stability, crash safety, reliability). Modern cars are very good - just compare actual stopping distances with those from the Highway Code.

Germany still has some unrestricted sections of autobahn - this isn't a country that doesn't care about road safety. Having said that, I'm not a fan of speed for the sake of it, but I do like acceleration.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 4 weeks ago
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Linda2013)
Hi my friend has been caught speeding he did a speed awareness course 3 years ago and currently has a clean licence. He’s had a letter today to say he’s been caught doing 96mph in a 60 any idea what penalty hes looking at? Or anyone been in same situation? Thanks
As above, I'm not shocked by 96mph. I am that they didn't seem to know that they'd been caught though - driving, at any speed, requires good observation.

Luckily, I'm not familiar with how harsh the UK system is these days. Please document what happens here, for others.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
You can't justify that - it may or may not be, depending upon a number of factors. Speed limits are often arbitrary. I base my judgement of a safe speed on several factors, some major ones being whether there is pedestrian access, traffic level, dual carriageway and road / weather conditions. I do not speed in residential areas, but, on motorways, most people do, yet they are still the safest road, per mile.

I know several dual carriage way roads with limits from 50mph, where, with suitable conditions, very high speeds (120mph+) would be safe. Many roads have had limits reduced over the past decades, despite cars being much, much, more capable. A car from the '70s is shocking in almost every respect (e.g. braking, road holding, aerodynamic stability, crash safety, reliability). Modern cars are very good - just compare actual stopping distances with those from the Highway Code.

Germany still has some unrestricted sections of autobahn - this isn't a country that doesn't care about road safety. Having said that, I'm not a fan of speed for the sake of it, but I do like acceleration.
No you can justify that - as you may or may not be aware, the maximum speed limit in the UK is 70. He was doing 26 mph over the national speed limit.

Now I know there is not a driver on this planet that has not broken the limit at some point, but given that he has already had a conviction - then you need to be careful.

It is a different scenario but my friend got a drink driving conviction and then got another one. She was lucky to escape a jail sentence. She was fined a lot of money and banned for 40 months or so. She will never drive again
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
No you can justify that - as you may or may not be aware, the maximum speed limit in the UK is 70. He was doing 26 mph over the national speed limit.
They said "completely reckless", not "illegal". I agree that it is "completely" illegal, but, depending upon safety factors, may not be "reckless".
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
They said "completely reckless", not "illegal". I agree that it is "completely" illegal, but, depending upon safety factors, may not be "reckless".
If you already have a previous conviction for speeding - it is reckless. Definition: utterly unconcerned about the consequences of some action
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username4222532
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There could be a £500 fine
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RedGiant
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Best place to ask is on Pepipoo.com
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
If you already have a previous conviction for speeding - it is reckless. Definition: utterly unconcerned about the consequences of some action
I'll agree that deliberate breaking of a law without knowing the legal consequences is reckless. However, in the context of driving, it's almost always the safety aspect that is meant.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
I'll agree that deliberate breaking of a law without knowing the legal consequences is reckless. However, in the context of driving, it's almost always the safety aspect that is meant.
*Hits head against wall*

Scenario - deer runs out in front of you and you are doing 96 mph. Car coming in opposite direction.

Scenario - tyre bursts and you are doing 96 mph etc.

You only need to be in Accident and Emergency on a Saturday night to see the consequence of speeding.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
*Hits head against wall*

Scenario - deer runs out in front of you and you are doing 96 mph. Car coming in opposite direction.

Scenario - tyre bursts and you are doing 96 mph etc.
I do wonder if you understood what you quoted. I hope that your head is OK - you now see that low speed impacts can be dangerous ..

The speed limit is not some magic number, below which accidents can't happen, or aren't serious. If you hit a large deer at 70mph, you will have issues. If you hit a pedestrian at 40mph, they probably won't make it. One major factor in determining a safe speed has to be the possibility of pedestrians. A safe speed can be significantly below the speed limit, e.g. in bad weather or near where children are playing. I also mentioned dual carriageways as a factor, acknowledging the issue with head-on collisions.

Ultimately, the driver is responsible for driving at a safe speed.

(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
You only need to be in Accident and Emergency on a Saturday night to see the consequence of speeding.
Yes, unsafe speed can have very serious consequences, and I'm certainly not advocating a complete disregard for speed limits. There are also things that can happen at "safe" speeds, especially where other drivers are involved.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
I do wonder if you understood what you quoted. I hope that your head is OK - you now see that low speed impacts can be dangerous ..

The speed limit is not some magic number, below which accidents can't happen, or aren't serious. If you hit a large deer at 70mph, you will have issues. If you hit a pedestrian at 40mph, they probably won't make it. One major factor in determining a safe speed has to be the possibility of pedestrians. A safe speed can be significantly below the speed limit, e.g. in bad weather or near where children are playing. I also mentioned dual carriageways as a factor, acknowledging the issue with head-on collisions.

Ultimately, the driver is responsible for driving at a safe speed.


Yes, unsafe speed can have very serious consequences, and I'm certainly not advocating a complete disregard for speed limits. There are also things that can happen at "safe" speeds, especially where other drivers are involved.
Yes of course I see that low speed impacts can be dangerous. I am not stupid. I am a bit of a petrol head - I love sports cars and have always owned one or been in the process of looking for another one. We are veering away from the topic at the top of the page - the stupidity of the friend who got a second speeding fine despite having already had one.

Anyway it seems we are never going to agree - I have today started on another antihypertensive and this conversation if just not going to help the matters.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by Linda2013)
Hi my friend has been caught speeding he did a speed awareness course 3 years ago and currently has a clean licence. He’s had a letter today to say he’s been caught doing 96mph in a 60 any idea what penalty hes looking at? Or anyone been in same situation? Thanks
6 points and a fine, or a disqualification.

Only an idiot gets caught speeding.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Yes of course I see that low speed impacts can be dangerous. I am not stupid. I am a bit of a petrol head - I love sports cars and have always owned one or been in the process of looking for another one. We are veering away from the topic at the top of the page - the stupidity of the friend who got a second speeding fine despite having already had one.

Anyway it seems we are never going to agree - I have today started on another antihypertensive and this conversation if just not going to help the matters.
We agree on "the stupidity of the friend who got a second speeding fine despite having already had one". I'd said:

(Original post by RogerOxon)
As above, I'm not shocked by 96mph. I am that they didn't seem to know that they'd been caught though - driving, at any speed, requires good observation.
My reason for commenting was:
(Original post by Bexjw)
Doing 36mph over the speed limit is completely reckless and with a previous speeding conviction, he deserves everything he gets.
My point was that there are roads and conditions where 36mph over the speed limit is safe. I don't know if this case was one of them though. Everyone speeds, many unsafely, but that does not mean that it's always dangerous.
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the bear
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afaik the option of speed awareness courses is not available due to Wuhan Disease.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by the bear)
afaik the option of speed awareness courses is not available due to Wuhan Disease.
Some police forces are offering a digital online version.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by RedGiant)
Some police forces are offering a digital online version.
Not for the OP though.
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richmkay
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(Original post by Linda2013)
Hi my friend has been caught speeding he did a speed awareness course 3 years ago and currently has a clean licence. He’s had a letter today to say he’s been caught doing 96mph in a 60 any idea what penalty hes looking at? Or anyone been in same situation? Thanks
We had a lad at work get caught doing 95 in a 60 and he got a ban with a 1200 fine...

I agree with Bexjw that doing almost 40 over the posted limit is reckless. It's not just the fact that they got caught speeding, it's also considered reckless driving which means more points if they so wish to prosecute them for it too.

All it takes is one momentary lapse in concentration and it goes from a speeding ticket to death by dangerous driving. Is it really worth it to get there a few minutes earlier? I wish the best for your friend but I feel that the law is going to be rather heavy in this situation.
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RoyalSheepy
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(Original post by IWMTom)
6 points and a fine, or a disqualification.

Only an idiot gets caught speeding.
Say no to speed cameras and they can't fine you.
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