Mental health- Healthcare Assistant

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Ellie121
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I’ve recently been offered an interview for a mental health HCA position. I was wondering whether anyone has any experience of the types of questions that made me asked, or could provide some insight into what the role consists of
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Jonah9000
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(Original post by Ellie121)
I’ve recently been offered an interview for a mental health HCA position. I was wondering whether anyone has any experience of the types of questions that made me asked, or could provide some insight into what the role consists of
Hi! Not entirely sure what a healthcare assistant is, but I was a mental health support worker. I can’t remember the interview questions now, but the role involved cleaning, making tea, making beds etc., as well as speaking with the patients, taking them out for the day and to the doctors and other appointments, and writing a daily report on each of them, as well as other miscellaneous duties. I had to sleep in work one night a week.
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Jonah9000)
Hi! Not entirely sure what a healthcare assistant is, but I was a mental health support worker. I can’t remember the interview questions now, but the role involved cleaning, making tea, making beds etc., as well as speaking with the patients, taking them out for the day and to the doctors and other appointments, and writing a daily report on each of them, as well as other miscellaneous duties. I had to sleep in work one night a week.
Hi Jonah,

Thank you for your reply- I really appreciate, definitely provided some more insight into what the role may consist of. Would it be okay if I asked you a couple of other questions related to your role and your experience of it?
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Jonah9000
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(Original post by Ellie121)
Hi Jonah,

Thank you for your reply- I really appreciate, definitely provided some more insight into what the role may consist of. Would it be okay if I asked you a couple of other questions related to your role and your experience of it?
Yep no problem!
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henleykt
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As far as I know a healthcare assistant will do all the things jonah9000 has said but also does personal care such as washing, dressing, toileting etc.
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glassalice
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(Original post by Ellie121)
I’ve recently been offered an interview for a mental health HCA position. I was wondering whether anyone has any experience of the types of questions that made me asked, or could provide some insight into what the role consists of
What setting are you working in ie. acute hospital, supported living, PICU...
What client group are you going to be working with?
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Jonah9000)
Yep no problem!
Thank you! Honestly I have so many questions, and I guess you never really know the answer until you’re able to talk to someone about it or experience it yourself so I really appreciate you taking the time to answer some of my questions.

I was wondering what was the most challenging aspect for you personally ( in the role)?
Also, whether anyone had absconded whilst you were out with them ( and how you coped, If this has happened).
I guess this may differ between people, but did you enjoy the role?

Sorry, I apologise for the overload of questions- I really do have so many questions
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Ellie121
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(Original post by henleykt)
As far as I know a healthcare assistant will do all the things jonah9000 has said but also does personal care such as washing, dressing, toileting etc.
Thank you for your response, it’s really helpful
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Ellie121
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(Original post by glassalice)
What setting are you working in ie. acute hospital, supported living, PICU...
What client group are you going to be working with?
It’s an inpatient hospital, supporting those who have been detained under the mental health act and those who have been informally ‘admitted’. It focuses mainly on those of high dependency, and seeks to provide a wide range of therapy and support to work towards recovery (however that may look for the individual) and ensuring their safety.

The client group is very mixed, but a main client group is those with personality disorders. Also, a large proportion of those at the hospital suffer from one of a number of psychotic illnesses ( so schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dual diagnosis).
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Jonah9000
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(Original post by Ellie121)
Thank you! Honestly I have so many questions, and I guess you never really know the answer until you’re able to talk to someone about it or experience it yourself so I really appreciate you taking the time to answer some of my questions.

I was wondering what was the most challenging aspect for you personally ( in the role)?
Also, whether anyone had absconded whilst you were out with them ( and how you coped, If this has happened).
I guess this may differ between people, but did you enjoy the role?

Sorry, I apologise for the overload of questions- I really do have so many questions
The most challenging part was working with elderly long-term mentally ill patients, it was very depressing. No one absconded, it wasn’t a secure unit or anything just normal residential houses and the residents were generally free to come and go. I might not be the best person to ask as it wasn’t the best time of my life for personal reasons thus I don’t think it is a happy time in my memory. I also felt frustrated that I couldn’t actually help people with their mental health, although really I should have realised I was helping them in other ways. It’s a good job for some relevant experience of mental health care if you’re thinking of a mental health nursing role or psychology or even psychiatry, but I didn’t stay particularly long, as there was no advancement possibility within the role except by training in one of the mental health related professions (currently training as a psychotherapist, and the experience did help me get that training!)
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Jonah9000)
The most challenging part was working with elderly long-term mentally ill patients, it was very depressing. No one absconded, it wasn’t a secure unit or anything just normal residential houses and the residents were generally free to come and go. I might not be the best person to ask as it wasn’t the best time of my life for personal reasons thus I don’t think it is a happy time in my memory. I also felt frustrated that I couldn’t actually help people with their mental health, although really I should have realised I was helping them in other ways. It’s a good job for some relevant experience of mental health care if you’re thinking of a mental health nursing role or psychology or even psychiatry, but I didn’t stay particularly long, as there was no advancement possibility within the role except by training in one of the mental health related professions (currently training as a psychotherapist, and the experience did help me get that training!)
It sounds really difficult to support individuals who have struggled with their mental health for a large proportion of their lives, with very little relief from the challenges their mental health brings them in regards to their happiness, wellbeing, and safety.

Honestly, the fear I have of a resident running away whilst I’m out with them is next level especially if I’m out with more than that one individual at the time this occurs.

It seems that despite it being a difficult time in your life personally, you were able to provide a great level of care and kindness to those who were responsible of supporting.

It’s great that you’re able to recognise the positive impact you did have on those you were supporting. It sounds frustrating to feel as if you’re having little impact, but sometimes simply being there next to someone can be helpful to the individual ( added into all the practical help you provided in the role, enabling the residents to develop greater independence).

Oh wow, a psychotherapist... that’s so cool. All the hard work so far seems to really be paying off, but I’m sure there’s plenty more to come! I think for any psychology related job that requires extra education and training it’s really helpful to actually be in a residential/ supported living environment with the people you aim to support.

Is it okay if I ask how long you were at the job ( mental health support worker). I ask because I start placement, as part of my degree in January ( delayed due to corona), for 4 days a week and so I think this particular job I’m interested in is less flexible with days I work ( even if I work for the 3 other days) then some of the support worker roles that I’ve applied to which offer full-time, part-time and weekends only.

Thanks again for answering my questions! It’s been really helpful, and making it less frightening.
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Jonah9000
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(Original post by Ellie121)
It sounds really difficult to support individuals who have struggled with their mental health for a large proportion of their lives, with very little relief from the challenges their mental health brings them in regards to their happiness, wellbeing, and safety.

Honestly, the fear I have of a resident running away whilst I’m out with them is next level especially if I’m out with more than that one individual at the time this occurs.

It seems that despite it being a difficult time in your life personally, you were able to provide a great level of care and kindness to those who were responsible of supporting.

It’s great that you’re able to recognise the positive impact you did have on those you were supporting. It sounds frustrating to feel as if you’re having little impact, but sometimes simply being there next to someone can be helpful to the individual ( added into all the practical help you provided in the role, enabling the residents to develop greater independence).

Oh wow, a psychotherapist... that’s so cool. All the hard work so far seems to really be paying off, but I’m sure there’s plenty more to come! I think for any psychology related job that requires extra education and training it’s really helpful to actually be in a residential/ supported living environment with the people you aim to support.

Is it okay if I ask how long you were at the job ( mental health support worker). I ask because I start placement, as part of my degree in January ( delayed due to corona), for 4 days a week and so I think this particular job I’m interested in is less flexible with days I work ( even if I work for the 3 other days) then some of the support worker roles that I’ve applied to which offer full-time, part-time and weekends only.

Thanks again for answering my questions! It’s been really helpful, and making it less frightening.
You have a very good outlook, a positive way to view things. I think it was just a bad time of my life as I was going through bereavement and would not have been so bad otherwise. I did enjoy my time working with learning difficulties people and also with schizophrenics at a better stage of recovery more. I worked for 6 months to a year, maybe 9 months? I left for a teaching job, as the other problem was I did not get on with my manager, and the hours for the teaching job were much better (and at the time I intended to become a full time schoolteacher, not work in mental health for a career.) But it was a valuable experience overall, I would say choose the most flexible hours you can unless the jobs are not in relevant areas, because I remember the support worker shifts were very bad and also the 24 hours in work day was really bad.
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Bexjw
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I’m a Mental Health HCA. 🙂 I’m currently working with Learning Disabilities and Autism challenging behaviour patients but have worked on some of the other MH wards.

My interview was very straight forward as I was recruited on the bank first but ended up getting redeployed through my full time job to the wards during COVID.

They asked basic scenarios such as - a patient has come out of their room in the morning and has no clothes on. How do you handle it/ what do you do?
A patient is upset, what would you do?

Using common sense is enough but also knowing that sometimes you will be working with ‘challenging’ patients and knowing your boundaries as a professional is important. General aspects like knowing about confidentiality, good team work and interpersonal skills all are useful.

If you have any questions about the job, feel free to ask! I’ve loved my redeployment so much that I’ve been contracted as a full time member of staff on the wards. 😊
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Jonah9000
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(Original post by Ellie121)
It sounds really difficult to support individuals who have struggled with their mental health for a large proportion of their lives, with very little relief from the challenges their mental health brings them in regards to their happiness, wellbeing, and safety.

Honestly, the fear I have of a resident running away whilst I’m out with them is next level especially if I’m out with more than that one individual at the time this occurs.

It seems that despite it being a difficult time in your life personally, you were able to provide a great level of care and kindness to those who were responsible of supporting.

It’s great that you’re able to recognise the positive impact you did have on those you were supporting. It sounds frustrating to feel as if you’re having little impact, but sometimes simply being there next to someone can be helpful to the individual ( added into all the practical help you provided in the role, enabling the residents to develop greater independence).

Oh wow, a psychotherapist... that’s so cool. All the hard work so far seems to really be paying off, but I’m sure there’s plenty more to come! I think for any psychology related job that requires extra education and training it’s really helpful to actually be in a residential/ supported living environment with the people you aim to support.

Is it okay if I ask how long you were at the job ( mental health support worker). I ask because I start placement, as part of my degree in January ( delayed due to corona), for 4 days a week and so I think this particular job I’m interested in is less flexible with days I work ( even if I work for the 3 other days) then some of the support worker roles that I’ve applied to which offer full-time, part-time and weekends only.

Thanks again for answering my questions! It’s been really helpful, and making it less frightening.
You have a very good outlook, a positive way to view things. I think it was just a bad time of my life as I was going through bereavement and would not have been so bad otherwise. I did enjoy my time working with learning difficulties people and also with schizophrenics at a better stage of recovery more. I worked for 6 months to a year, maybe 9 months? I left for a teaching job, as the other problem was I did not get on with my manager, and the hours for the teaching job were much better (and at the time I intended to become a full time schoolteacher, not work in mental health for a career.) But it was a valuable experience overall, I would say choose the most flexible hours you can unless the jobs are not in relevant areas, because I remember the shifts can be very unsociable.

From having met you today I can tell you will be really well suited to a caring role and will ace the interview, you have a great attitude. Also helping people is very fulfilling, please don’t let me put you off!
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Jonah9000)
You have a very good outlook, a positive way to view things. I think it was just a bad time of my life as I was going through bereavement and would not have been so bad otherwise. I did enjoy my time working with learning difficulties people and also with schizophrenics at a better stage of recovery more. I worked for 6 months to a year, maybe 9 months? I left for a teaching job, as the other problem was I did not get on with my manager, and the hours for the teaching job were much better (and at the time I intended to become a full time schoolteacher, not work in mental health for a career.) But it was a valuable experience overall, I would say choose the most flexible hours you can unless the jobs are not in relevant areas, because I remember the support worker shifts were very bad and also the 24 hours in work day was really bad.
I’m glad you found other client groups more enjoyable to work with personally, perhaps reflecting the change in your own emotions, pain, and thoughts. I think everything you do teaches you some skill, value, or something about your own strength and resilience.

I really hope that the staff are friendly wherever I do end up working, because I think for you to be the best support worker/ HCA you need to feel comfortable reaching out to those around you to continue to develop and grow ( whilst always making sure the residents are safe and supported, regardless of your own personal feelings).

The hours are definitely interesting, but to be honest (this may probably be through lack of experience) I like the idea of working longer shifts and then having more days off. I’ll probably change my mind very quickly as to where that’s concerned
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Jonah9000)
You have a very good outlook, a positive way to view things. I think it was just a bad time of my life as I was going through bereavement and would not have been so bad otherwise. I did enjoy my time working with learning difficulties people and also with schizophrenics at a better stage of recovery more. I worked for 6 months to a year, maybe 9 months? I left for a teaching job, as the other problem was I did not get on with my manager, and the hours for the teaching job were much better (and at the time I intended to become a full time schoolteacher, not work in mental health for a career.) But it was a valuable experience overall, I would say choose the most flexible hours you can unless the jobs are not in relevant areas, because I remember the shifts can be very unsociable.

From having met you today I can tell you will be really well suited to a caring role and will ace the interview, you have a great attitude. Also helping people is very fulfilling, please don’t let me put you off!
I’m really interested in working with those with learning disabilities and autism too, but I’d say mental health was the route I wanted to most go down. Saying that though, there’s plenty of time for me to pursue both at some point. I just think some roles I’ve looked into are more flexible, and I think my willingness to work weekends makes it easier for when I do start placement ( as most people don’t like working weekends).

You definitely haven’t put me off, I tend to put myself off of things ( if anyone’s to do it). Thank you for your kind words, and all your help. You’re definitely developed, utilising your warmth and empathy, to be get at the careers you’ve gone into
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Bexjw)
I’m a Mental Health HCA. 🙂 I’m currently working with Learning Disabilities and Autism challenging behaviour patients but have worked on some of the other MH wards.

My interview was very straight forward as I was recruited on the bank first but ended up getting redeployed through my full time job to the wards during COVID.

They asked basic scenarios such as - a patient has come out of their room in the morning and has no clothes on. How do you handle it/ what do you do?
A patient is upset, what would you do?

Using common sense is enough but also knowing that sometimes you will be working with ‘challenging’ patients and knowing your boundaries as a professional is important. General aspects like knowing about confidentiality, good team work and interpersonal skills all are useful.

If you have any questions about the job, feel free to ask! I’ve loved my redeployment so much that I’ve been contracted as a full time member of staff on the wards. 😊
Hey, thanks for replying- I really appreciate it. It seems like you’ve supported a large number of client groups; im also really interested in learning disabilities and those with autism. To be honest, I’m kind of applying to a wide range of similar roles. Beggars really can’t be choosers mental health is definitely the area I’m most interested in though.

Oh that’s interesting to here, so you think the recruitment process tends to differ based on whether your role is permanent or bank? * switches to apply to all bank roles * kidding. Unless I’m being really dense and that’s not what you meant at all. But if it is what you meant, how did you find it having to switch wards constantly?

Thank you for some interview questions that may come up. Honestly I dread scenario questions, even when they should be logical since it’s about safety and well-being. To be honest, I think I just hate interviews altogether ( even if they haven’t gone badly from experience, but the unexpected nature of something new can can an interesting Challenge).

I’m wondering whether in any of your roles you’ve had to do any written tasks or aptitude tests? I don’t think any I’ve been offered interviews for are planning to do this, as they haven’t said but who knows.

Aww yay, go you! That’s so great, you totally deserve to be a permanent member of the staff- I can see how warm, empathetic, and friendly you are already from the one message you’ve sent. The people you support are lucky to have you.

Thank you for being willing to answer some more questions
I was wondering what client group you’ve enjoyed working with the most, but also how they differ and how they are similar to one another. I really can’t decide which client group id like to work with most/ whether it matters longer term.
Also, what has been the most challenging aspect for the job and how you personally manage the stress and emotions that may arise.
If you’ve done a night shift, I’m wondering how you found this and the environment in which it took place. Just thinking of having to sit in someone’s room in the dark whilst the sleep makes me tired.
Sorry for all the questions, I’m just so interested in finding out more- have you ever been out with several ( more than one person) individuals and had one of them run away whilst under your care?

Many thanks
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Bexjw
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(Original post by Ellie121)
Hey, thanks for replying- I really appreciate it. It seems like you’ve supported a large number of client groups; im also really interested in learning disabilities and those with autism. To be honest, I’m kind of applying to a wide range of similar roles. Beggars really can’t be choosers mental health is definitely the area I’m most interested in though.

Oh that’s interesting to here, so you think the recruitment process tends to differ based on whether your role is permanent or bank? * switches to apply to all bank roles * kidding. Unless I’m being really dense and that’s not what you meant at all. But if it is what you meant, how did you find it having to switch wards constantly?

Thank you for some interview questions that may come up. Honestly I dread scenario questions, even when they should be logical since it’s about safety and well-being. To be honest, I think I just hate interviews altogether ( even if they haven’t gone badly from experience, but the unexpected nature of something new can can an interesting Challenge).

I’m wondering whether in any of your roles you’ve had to do any written tasks or aptitude tests? I don’t think any I’ve been offered interviews for are planning to do this, as they haven’t said but who knows.

Aww yay, go you! That’s so great, you totally deserve to be a permanent member of the staff- I can see how warm, empathetic, and friendly you are already from the one message you’ve sent. The people you support are lucky to have you.

Thank you for being willing to answer some more questions
I was wondering what client group you’ve enjoyed working with the most, but also how they differ and how they are similar to one another. I really can’t decide which client group id like to work with most/ whether it matters longer term.
Also, what has been the most challenging aspect for the job and how you personally manage the stress and emotions that may arise.
If you’ve done a night shift, I’m wondering how you found this and the environment in which it took place. Just thinking of having to sit in someone’s room in the dark whilst the sleep makes me tired.
Sorry for all the questions, I’m just so interested in finding out more- have you ever been out with several ( more than one person) individuals and had one of them run away whilst under your care?

Many thanks
No problem! With my Trust, there was a huge recruitment drive for the bank for HCAs and you basically then booked shifts as you wanted them and on which wards had availability. As I was working with the Community team linked with the ward, I stayed with that group the most. Depending on your role, you may be based on one roll permanently or move about. It’s important to remember that not all wards are the same and sometimes a settling in period is needed before you start to feel more confident and less out of your depth.

If there’s very few of you applying, it may be more personal. My recruitment was nearly 70 HCAs being taken on a once so we were all interviewed in a group to make it easier and the competencies/ questions done by a written exercise and submitted. You might have an interview where someone sits in front of you and asks questions. I can’t imagine it would be too difficult and again, common sense prevails!

Being on the bank wasn’t bad as you normally get supernumerary shifts (shifts which you’re paid for but basically observe and do minimal tasks). Our ward were so desperate we kind of got dropped in but knew before hand so it wasn’t a surprise. If the shifts are going on the same ward, you can always book the same ward and avoid wards you disliked.

I felt nervous and it wasn’t anything awful! At the end of the day, as long as you show you’re sensible, willing to learn and suited to a caring role, then they’ll take you. 😊

Like I said, as we were a large group, our questions were written instead of interviewed in the regular style of interview. Other than that, nope! No tests!

Thank you! That’s extremely kind! I’ve honestly loved it and the ward are very welcoming and friendly.

I’ve really enjoyed the Learning Disabilities but also admissions through the 136 suite (basically when someone is detained for their own safety/ safety of others and then assessed and either released or sectioned for admission. It’s quite rare to get shifts though as you can’t tell when someone may be admitted but I was drawn from my ward to support the other night as they had no female staff and enjoyed it.

I wouldn’t worry too much about your preferred client group until you’ve tried everything! It might sound awful/lovely and then you get there and it’s the opposite. Mainly about finding where you fit in!

Most difficult is that we have patients who are in longterm and shouldn’t be but the system just lets them down. We also get a lot of violence and aggression from our wards. We’re PMVA (restraint) trained but it can be a lot when your day has 10 restraints for one patient in one 12.5hr shift. In the Mental Health side, you don’t tend to get so much but can get threats of suicide or harm but a good staff team help you through it. The best way to handle it is to remember that you come in for your shift, work it and then you go home. You don’t have to think about it again. When you come in next time, it’s a new day and things can be extremely different. Again, good team working is essential. If you’re ever worried about anything on shift, you’re always welcome to raise it with the Nurse in charge.

I’ve found them a nice break to be honest! Patients are usually only up for a few hours and then encouraged to bed and for their bedtime routines. They tend to go a lot quicker in my opinion! We tend to sit outside their rooms and take turns each hour, swapping round. You can read your book/ watch Netflix, entertain yourself but just keep in mind that they may wake. Usually a bit of encouragement and they go back to bed. I’ve had a patient come out, seem to start an argument and when I’ve said goodnight he’s simply said “good night Becca” and gone back to bed for the night! 😂

At the moment we’re working our ward split in two due to patients and circumstances. We usually take patients out for a walk and it depends on their observation levels. E.g. one patient is 2:1 when awake and another is 4:1. Their S17 leave will outline how many members of staff they need, if it’s only ground leave/ on site or if they’re allowed use of the ward vehicle/ visits to the community. I haven’t but I know one of our current patients did abscond to nearby houses and has run away. One of our other patients has also tried to abscond whilst I was on shift but the other ward. I got a phone call to say “I’ve just seen one of your patients run off and being followed by staff, should we attend?” I asked if blicks had been pressed and when they said yes, I was like well yeah... please. 😂😂
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Ellie121
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(Original post by Bexjw)
No problem! With my Trust, there was a huge recruitment drive for the bank for HCAs and you basically then booked shifts as you wanted them and on which wards had availability. As I was working with the Community team linked with the ward, I stayed with that group the most. Depending on your role, you may be based on one roll permanently or move about. It’s important to remember that not all wards are the same and sometimes a settling in period is needed before you start to feel more confident and less out of your depth.

If there’s very few of you applying, it may be more personal. My recruitment was nearly 70 HCAs being taken on a once so we were all interviewed in a group to make it easier and the competencies/ questions done by a written exercise and submitted. You might have an interview where someone sits in front of you and asks questions. I can’t imagine it would be too difficult and again, common sense prevails!

Being on the bank wasn’t bad as you normally get supernumerary shifts (shifts which you’re paid for but basically observe and do minimal tasks). Our ward were so desperate we kind of got dropped in but knew before hand so it wasn’t a surprise. If the shifts are going on the same ward, you can always book the same ward and avoid wards you disliked.

I felt nervous and it wasn’t anything awful! At the end of the day, as long as you show you’re sensible, willing to learn and suited to a caring role, then they’ll take you. 😊

Like I said, as we were a large group, our questions were written instead of interviewed in the regular style of interview. Other than that, nope! No tests!

Thank you! That’s extremely kind! I’ve honestly loved it and the ward are very welcoming and friendly.

I’ve really enjoyed the Learning Disabilities but also admissions through the 136 suite (basically when someone is detained for their own safety/ safety of others and then assessed and either released or sectioned for admission. It’s quite rare to get shifts though as you can’t tell when someone may be admitted but I was drawn from my ward to support the other night as they had no female staff and enjoyed it.

I wouldn’t worry too much about your preferred client group until you’ve tried everything! It might sound awful/lovely and then you get there and it’s the opposite. Mainly about finding where you fit in!

Most difficult is that we have patients who are in longterm and shouldn’t be but the system just lets them down. We also get a lot of violence and aggression from our wards. We’re PMVA (restraint) trained but it can be a lot when your day has 10 restraints for one patient in one 12.5hr shift. In the Mental Health side, you don’t tend to get so much but can get threats of suicide or harm but a good staff team help you through it. The best way to handle it is to remember that you come in for your shift, work it and then you go home. You don’t have to think about it again. When you come in next time, it’s a new day and things can be extremely different. Again, good team working is essential. If you’re ever worried about anything on shift, you’re always welcome to raise it with the Nurse in charge.

I’ve found them a nice break to be honest! Patients are usually only up for a few hours and then encouraged to bed and for their bedtime routines. They tend to go a lot quicker in my opinion! We tend to sit outside their rooms and take turns each hour, swapping round. You can read your book/ watch Netflix, entertain yourself but just keep in mind that they may wake. Usually a bit of encouragement and they go back to bed. I’ve had a patient come out, seem to start an argument and when I’ve said goodnight he’s simply said “good night Becca” and gone back to bed for the night! 😂

At the moment we’re working our ward split in two due to patients and circumstances. We usually take patients out for a walk and it depends on their observation levels. E.g. one patient is 2:1 when awake and another is 4:1. Their S17 leave will outline how many members of staff they need, if it’s only ground leave/ on site or if they’re allowed use of the ward vehicle/ visits to the community. I haven’t but I know one of our current patients did abscond to nearby houses and has run away. One of our other patients has also tried to abscond whilst I was on shift but the other ward. I got a phone call to say “I’ve just seen one of your patients run off and being followed by staff, should we attend?” I asked if blicks had been pressed and when they said yes, I was like well yeah... please. 😂😂
Settling in period is always good. I think for any role it would take a while to feel wholly comfortable in your own abilities, but also with the staff and patients. Bank must be a whole other level of this to begin with, needing time per each ward to feel comfortable and confident. I guess it’s just important to remember you’ve got the skills needed if you’ve been given the job. How often was bank work available would you say?

Yeah, I think making sure your values align with the ethos of the company is really important- for them but also for you too. So hopefully the interview won’t ask me things I’d find hard to answer ( due to lack of experience).

I feel like the idea of a group interview is terrifying, but your own seemed quite nice ( since you didn’t really have the 1-to-1 interaction with interviewers). Due to corona, I think it will be a 1-to-1 with me and the interviewer ( possibly more than 1 interviewer). The advert for the job has been up for a while now (30+ days) so I think they are just doing interviews as and when based on the interviewer’s availability. Also, it’s a single hospital ( and no further care environments within the ‘company’) so again I’m hoping the process isn’t too complicated and that they are desperate.

I really hope the staff (whenever I do end up employee) are really nice because I can’t imagine anything harder than an unsupportive team when you’re dealing with ‘challenging’ behaviour.

It’s upsetting to see a lot of individuals simply failed because of it being easier to keep them there/ not thoroughly exploring the situation or helping them gain greater independence. Wow 10 restraints in one shift, nearly every hour... i can’t even imagine how exhausting it must be for you guys. How tiring do you find the work ( regardless of client group/ ward) both mentally but also physically?

In theory, you definitely should have some more time to yourself when working nights. Do you find it difficult to get the individuals to bed? Often people find the night most difficult to cope with due to being left alone with their thoughts and having little to occupy them, but also general difficulties sleeping. I love how you just basically told him no and he knew not to try anything with you that night and then went back to bed.

I was reading an interview question that asked ‘what would you do if you were out with three clients and one decided to run away?’. To me that was interesting because I hadn’t really expected there to be one HCA to three individuals on an outing ( I get that the number of staff/ratio reflects the level of risk, but that’s a lot to attend to and anything can happen and it’s like typically you’d have to try to catch them but like you’re responsible for the safety of two other people too). Love that addition of a please at the end

Could I ask you a little more about the training you received and how good you found it in preparing you for the role?

Sorry for all the questions. It’s just that everything you said was super interesting

Thanks
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