Corbyn slander vs Boris

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ColinDent
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#61
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#61
(Original post by Burridge)
I’m very used to hearing people say a lot worse as part of ‘normal chat’, doesn’t mean it’s acceptable does it? This is an online debating forum, there’s no need to be ill-mannered or rude. It isn’t really a class issue, just about a bit of common-courtesy.
Like I say it's just that I speak and am used to being spoken too.
And let's not pretend that there have not been many, many provocative things said about "gammon" and "fascists" because of their opposition to the idea that Corbyn should have ever got anywhere near to 10 downing Street.
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DSilva
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#62
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(Original post by ColinDent)
I wouldn't have called what I said an insult, it was a statement of fact.
Certain people will not let go of the whole Corbyn thing, and for them (like at the beginning of this thread) it does turn into a Corbyn wankfest.
Corbyn is done, get over it.
So what if it does? People are allowed to discuss whoever they want.

I mean you've chosen to engage yourself in a debate about him. If you think it's over (and it is) and there should be no more discussions about him then fair enough. But perhaps you should heed your own advice and not partake in discussions about him?
Last edited by DSilva; 4 weeks ago
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ColinDent
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#63
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(Original post by DSilva)
So what if it does? People are allowed to discuss whoever they want.

I mean you've chosen to engage yourself in a debate about him. If you think it's over (and it is) and there should be no more discussions about him then fair enough. But perhaps you should heed your own advice and not partake in discussions about him?
As this is a public forum then I believe I'm allowed to express an opinion on whatever subject is being discussed, whether you or any others agree with it or not.
What all this derision from some of you looks like is intolerance of opposing views, perhaps it is you who should expand your social bubble.
Corbyn is done as is his strain of political thinking, it was nothing more than a fad and one which has severely damaged the labour party and it's ability to get into power.
The truth is that he was an opportunistic career politician and not some kind of saintly messiah and the sooner people move on from his outdated shadow the better.
So if I choose to call all this adulation of him a wankfest then that is what I will call it, because it is in danger of f*****g up the party which I ordinarily would vote for and is close to splitting it up completely.
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DSilva
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#64
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#64
(Original post by ColinDent)
As this is a public forum then I believe I'm allowed to express an opinion on whatever subject is being discussed, whether you or any others agree with it or not.
What all this derision from some of you looks like is intolerance of opposing views, perhaps it is you who should expand your social bubble.
At the beginning of this thread (before your first comment) there are 4 posts. Two from a Corbynista with a couple of admiring posts, one from a poster who simply says he wished Labour won in 2017 and another which didn't mention Corbyn at all. That's it. Hardly the 'w*nkfest' you're portraying it as.


Corbyn is done as is his strain of political thinking, it was nothing more than a fad and one which has severely damaged the labour party and it's ability to get into power.
The truth is that he was an opportunistic career politician and not some kind of saintly messiah and the sooner people move on from his outdated shadow the better.

To a fair amount of people, he was simply someone who put a lot of policies and issues back on the table that had been shunned for decades, notwithstanding his obvious faults. Even ignoring the more iffy stuff, he brought full throated opposition to austerity, support for public ownership of public utilities, an opposition to foreign wars.

And if they passionately believe in those things why shouldn't they argue for it? I'm not even talking about his leadership, or Brexit, but say for example greater funding for the NHS, schools, stronger employee rights, investment in childcare, a stronger welfare system etc.

You've already seen Burton Bridge clearly say that the reason he stopped voting Labour wasn't its economic policies. So why should people stop arguing for those policies?
Last edited by DSilva; 4 weeks ago
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speranzaaa
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#65
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#65
(Original post by DSilva)
Of course you are entitled to do so, and you should. But it's rather bizarre to have a go at people for discussing issuing x and then proceeding to engage yourself in a debate about issue x.

At the beginning of this thread (before your first comment) all there is, is one Corbynista with a couple of admiring posts, and one poster who simply says he wished Labour won in 2017. That's it. Hardly thr 'w*nkfest* you're portraying it as.




The truth can be somewhere in the middle.

To a fair amount of people, he was simply someone who put a lot of policies and issues back on the table that had been shunned for decades, notwithstanding his obvious faults. Even ignoring the more iffy stuff, he brought full throated opposition to austerity, support for public ownership of public utilities, an opposition to foreign wars.

You may oppose all of that, and that's up to you. And it's clear his overall leadership and Brexit policy were intolerable to a large amount of people. But you seem to be telling people to throw the baby out with the bathwater. I would argue there was a fair amount of stuff on the economy he was right about and he did change the conversation about, and it would be a mistake to completely junk all of it.

And the way you simply dismissed polling which showed that policies you oppose are popular, was quite corbynista of you!
[/QUOTE]
stormzy said it best: f boris
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barnetlad
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#66
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#66
Jeremy Corbyn would not have made the comments that Boris Johnson has made about care homes.
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Burridge
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#67
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#67
(Original post by ColinDent)
Like I say it's just that I speak and am used to being spoken too.
And let's not pretend that there have not been many, many provocative things said about "gammon" and "fascists" because of their opposition to the idea that Corbyn should have ever got anywhere near to 10 downing Street.
I swear when talking in person. You could say that’s how I’m used to talking. But I apply a bit of a filter when trying to engage in civilised debate and show a bit of respect. We’re all different I guess.
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