guys, will u choose BSC or Msci when u apply for uni?

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Hedwigeeeee
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guys, will u choose BSC or Msci when u apply for uni? how do u think about them?
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richmkay
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I dont think you wrote that right... I may be wrong though.

You cant go straight to a Msci, at least I don't think so, you have to do BSc first then your masters
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jackien1
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(Original post by richmkay)
I dont think you wrote that right... I may be wrong though.

You cant go straight to a Msci, at least I don't think so, you have to do BSc first then your masters
I think OP might be talking about an integrated masters.

(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
guys, will u choose BSC or Msci when u apply for uni? how do u think about them?
If you're international, which your English somewhat indicates, go for Bsc. You can stay in the country to extend your visa but must go back to your home country to shorten your visa from integrated masters to Bsc if you don't meet the grade requirements or choose to do a masters elsewhere.
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excitedpresent
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(Original post by richmkay)
I dont think you wrote that right... I may be wrong though.

You cant go straight to a Msci, at least I don't think so, you have to do BSc first then your masters
Actually you can!
A lot of unis now offer 4 year courses instead of the regular BScs

(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
guys, will u choose BSC or Msci when u apply for uni? how do u think about them?
from what i've seen heard/MSci doesn't really have THAT much value. it's just easier to get the funding for.
A proper masters (MSc) is more valuable and involves more research experience. MSci is still considered an undergrad qualification.
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by excitedpresent)
Actually you can!
A lot of unis now offer 4 year courses instead of the regular BScs


from what i've seen heard/MSci doesn't really have THAT much value. it's just easier to get the funding for.
A proper masters (MSc) is more valuable and involves more research experience. MSci is still considered an undergrad qualification.
(Original post by jackien1)
I think OP might be talking about an integrated masters.


If you're international, which your English somewhat indicates, go for Bsc. You can stay in the country to extend your visa but must go back to your home country to shorten your visa from integrated masters to Bsc if you don't meet the grade requirements or choose to do a masters elsewhere.
I am an international student who want to apply for chemistry in IC, but just could not decide whether to apply for BSc which is a 3 yrs bachelor degree, and I have the chance to go to another uni or study sth else for master degree later, or should I choose the Msci which is 3 yrs bachelor and 1 yr master continuously, and if i choose that i can go to study for master directly but i can only study chem, not other subjects.
what do u think, and which option is more common for the students in the UK ?
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by excitedpresent)
Actually you can!
A lot of unis now offer 4 year courses instead of the regular BScs


from what i've seen heard/MSci doesn't really have THAT much value. it's just easier to get the funding for.
A proper masters (MSc) is more valuable and involves more research experience. MSci is still considered an undergrad qualification.
yes that 4 yrs course is exactly what i am talking about, i just wondering about its value because u do not need to reach what grades for ur master and u can just go to master directly. so a proper Msc seems better right?
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by jackien1)
I think OP might be talking about an integrated masters.


If you're international, which your English somewhat indicates, go for Bsc. You can stay in the country to extend your visa but must go back to your home country to shorten your visa from integrated masters to Bsc if you don't meet the grade requirements or choose to do a masters elsewhere.
pls bear with my English, it is terrible
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jackien1
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(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
I am an international student who want to apply for chemistry in IC, but just could not decide whether to apply for BSc which is a 3 yrs bachelor degree, and I have the chance to go to another uni or study sth else for master degree later, or should I choose the Msci which is 3 yrs bachelor and 1 yr master continuously, and if i choose that i can go to study for master directly but i can only study chem, not other subjects.
what do u think, and which option is more common for the students in the UK ?
(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
yes that 4 yrs course is exactly what i am talking about, i just wondering about its value because u do not need to reach what grades for ur master and u can just go to master directly. so a proper Msc seems better right?
I would recommend going for the Bsc. I myself was on an integrated masters course but didn't get the minimum grade required (65%) in second year to allow me to continue to be on the integrated masters. So I had to go back to my home country to shorten my visa, which obvs was a waste of both time (flight in total was >24h) and money (again, flight tickets).

Of course, if you are very sure you want to do the integrated masters and will get the grades, you will save the cost of applying for a visa if you just go for the integrated masters in the first place. I think giving yourself the freedom to choose what masters you want after 3 years at uni, and also protecting yourself against having to go back to your home country and applying for a visa there is worth the £600-ish a visa extension in the UK costs.

In contrast, if you go for the Bsc, and in third year decide to want to go for the integrated masters, most unis are very flexible in allowing you to change from Bsc to integrated masters and you can stay in the UK to apply for the visa.

So unless you are 1000000% sure you definitely want to do the integrated masters and are confident you can get the grades your uni asks for (different unis ask for different grades, I know loughborough asked only for 55%, whereas my uni asked for 65%), go for the Bsc.
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excitedpresent
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(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
yes that 4 yrs course is exactly what i am talking about, i just wondering about its value because u do not need to reach what grades for ur master and u can just go to master directly. so a proper Msc seems better right?
Yeah a proper MSc is definitely better.
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by jackien1)
I would recommend going for the Bsc. I myself was on an integrated masters course but didn't get the minimum grade required (65%) in second year to allow me to continue to be on the integrated masters. So I had to go back to my home country to shorten my visa, which obvs was a waste of both time (flight in total was >24h) and money (again, flight tickets).

Of course, if you are very sure you want to do the integrated masters and will get the grades, you will save the cost of applying for a visa if you just go for the integrated masters in the first place. I think giving yourself the freedom to choose what masters you want after 3 years at uni, and also protecting yourself against having to go back to your home country and applying for a visa there is worth the £600-ish a visa extension in the UK costs.

In contrast, if you go for the Bsc, and in third year decide to want to go for the integrated masters, most unis are very flexible in allowing you to change from Bsc to integrated masters and you can stay in the UK to apply for the masters.

So unless you are 1000000% sure you definitely want to do the integrated masters and are confident you can get the grades your uni asks for (different unis ask for different grades, I know loughborough asked only for 55%, whereas my uni asked for 65%), go for the Bsc.
thank u very much.
i am just a bit confused about what u said about did not reach the requirement in the second year? what does that mean,u mean the second year in bachelor? does ur grade of every year in bachelor determines whether u can go to master and if you did not reach the requirement in a single year then you should back to ur home country for visa.but u can extend ur visa if u reach the grade? is that right?that sounds so terrified....
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Txhmid
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funnily enough I just finished my first year at IC studying chemistry (MSci) and thought about changing to a Bsc then doing an Msc, but I think I will stay on to do MSci as the research field I'm interested in is available in the 4th year, and is cheaper since I continue to pay undergraduate fees for it.
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jackien1
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(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
thank u very much.
i am just a bit confused about what u said about did not reach the requirement in the second year? what does that mean,u mean the second year in bachelor? does ur grade of every year in bachelor determines whether u can go to master and if you did not reach the requirement in a single year then you should back to ur home country for visa.but u can extend ur visa if u reach the grade? is that right?that sounds so terrified....
Unis generally don't count first year. But yes, they use the second year grades to determine whether or not you can stay on the course. If your second year grades aren't good enough, the uni will automatically drop you to the Bsc, which you will have to go home to change the visa for. If in third year you really pull your grades up and ask the uni to switch to the integrated masters, you can stay in the country to extend your visa.

Unis aren't stupid enough to allow people scoring bad grades to go on to do a masters.
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Txhmid
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(Original post by jackien1)
Unis generally don't count first year. But yes, they use the second year grades to determine whethera or not you can stay on the course. If your second year grades aren't good enough, the uni will automatically drop you to the Bsc, which you will have to go home to change the visa for. If in third year you really pull your grades up and ask the uni to switch to the integrated masters, you can stay in the country to extend your visa.

Unis aren't stupid enough to allow people scoring bad grades to go on to do a masters.
at imperial first year counts as credit
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by Txhmid)
funnily enough I just finished my first year at IC studying chemistry (MSci) and thought about changing to a Bsc then doing an Msc, but I think I will stay on to do MSci as the research field I'm interested in is available in the 4th year, and is cheaper since I continue to pay undergraduate fees for it.
wow,that sounds cool,maybe Msci is more ecomonic and safty choice and Bsc offers u more choice. but it is true if u just want to continue in an area and Msci is better. p.s. u r so lucky to be accepted by IC
(Original post by Txhmid)
funnily enough I just finished my first year at IC studying chemistry (MSci) and thought about changing to a Bsc then doing an Msc, but I think I will stay on to do MSci as the research field I'm interested in is available in the 4th year, and is cheaper since I continue to pay undergraduate fees for it.
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Txhmid
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(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
wow,that sounds cool,maybe Msci is more ecomonic and safty choice and Bsc offers u more choice. but it is true if u just want to continue in an area and Msci is better. p.s. u r so lucky to be accepted by IC
I don't see a reason to not do an MSci unless: you don't want to study a masters in Chemistry and want to do a masters in another subject, you want to move to another university, or you don't want to do a masters. (Also getting into IC isn't luck, work hard my friend )
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by Txhmid)
I don't see a reason to not do an MSci unless: you don't want to study a masters in Chemistry and want to do a masters in another subject, you want to move to another university, or you don't want to do a masters. (Also getting into IC isn't luck, work hard my friend )
I know,it must require a lot of effort to go to IC....do u mind sharing what u studied for alevel? I am currently doing chem,bio ,Math,further math and Chinese
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Txhmid
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(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
I know,it must require a lot of effort to go to IC....do u mind sharing what u studied for alevel? I am currently doing chem,bio ,Math,further math and Chinese
Sure, I only studied 3: math, chem, bio. Dropped physics after year 1. Wow, doing 5 is very impressive. One thing to keep in mind is you really only need 3, any more is impressive but not required. Make sure you know you're capable of achieving at least an A in all of them!
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victoria98
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I think at most unis an integrated masters course won't give you as much research experience as a separate masters, and an integrated masters is of course an undergraduate qualification BUT I personally did an integrated masters in chemistry at Imperial and I'm glad I did because 1. we still did A LOT of hours in the lab because imperial places an emphasis on research experience and 2. I can now go straight into a PhD this year rather than finishing a 3 year course and then having to worry about applying to MRes or MSc courses since most PhD programmes require a masters degree. While doing them separately might very well look better on your CV, if you're going to stay in chemistry I don't see why you'd need to do the BSc first tbh, just added stress in your 3rd year. Alternatively, there's always the opportunity to transfer from MSci to BSc or from BSc to MSci (in 2nd year you need to get a certain overall percentage to stay on the MSci).
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Hedwigeeeee
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(Original post by Txhmid)
Sure, I only studied 3: math, chem, bio. Dropped physics after year 1. Wow, doing 5 is very impressive. One thing to keep in mind is you really only need 3, any more is impressive but not required. Make sure you know you're capable of achieving at least an A in all of them!
are u international student? i think it is almost impossible for us to use only 3 to apply for IC....most of the students in my country use four or even more....ಥ_ಥ
i am a bit worried about my predicted results .which will be released in August. because of coronivirus we cannot even have alevel official exams.
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jackien1
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(Original post by Txhmid)
at imperial first year counts as credit
Ah, I didn't know that. In that case, this:
(Original post by Hedwigeeeee)
thank u very much.
i am just a bit confused about what u said about did not reach the requirement in the second year? what does that mean,u mean the second year in bachelor? does ur grade of every year in bachelor determines whether u can go to master and if you did not reach the requirement in a single year then you should back to ur home country for visa.but u can extend ur visa if u reach the grade? is that right?that sounds so terrified....
is true. Each year probably does contribute to whether or not you'll be allowed to continue onto the integrated masters.

(Original post by Txhmid)
I don't see a reason to not do an MSci unless: you don't want to study a masters in Chemistry and want to do a masters in another subject, you want to move to another university, or you don't want to do a masters. (Also getting into IC isn't luck, work hard my friend )
You say you don't see a reason not to then go on to list a whole bunch of reasons... The fact that OP is an international student also complicates things a little. There's government/visa logistics to think through on top of just the uni logistics.
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