Why does the Government incentivise welfare?

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Quady
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#21
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#21
(Original post by monkeybest)
The Sky CEO recently informed shareholders that any cuts to welfare threatens a majority of their income - says it all doesnt it regarding their lifestyle right?
No link to that then huh?
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Mojmeer
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#22
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(Original post by monkeybest)
To incentivize work why doesnt the Government incentivize work by raising minimum wages at the same cutting income tax. Any reduction in the tax take could be offset by scrapping or cutting welfare to the bare bones.

At the minute you have a system where welfare pays more than work thats why great swathes of the population are addicted to it more than the worst drug.

You may also find if people couldnt spend their welfare **cough** other peoples cash on alcohol, tobacco and netflix then they wouldnt have to run to a food bank every week when their brains are wondering where all the oodles of cash given to them for doing f all has gone.

Time for a card based system to stop welfare being spent on non-essentials. The welfare gang say they are bored so they smoke and drink...well heres a thought --- get a job you lazy $%#%!!

The thousands that didnt show up to their work assessments is only scratching the surface of the generations of idle shysters in this country. These people are all experts in exploiting the system and know all the tricks e.g way to a bigger house for normal people is work for it, for them its simply bang another benefits baby out and go scrounging to the council. The system allows it time for that to change.

This country is heading for oblivion due to the do f all culture and someone else will take care of everything that these people have. Time for Boris and co. to wipe the smile off them once and for all while they swig their stella and puff on a pack of regal.
Cutting income tax only helps the grossly rich, they don't need it an poor people don't pay it anyway.
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Quady
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
Cutting income tax only helps the grossly rich, they don't need it an poor people don't pay it anyway.
Cutting basic rate to from 20% to 5% would only help the grossly rich....? Huh.....?

You really saying some on £13k/year isn't poor?
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Mojmeer
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#24
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(Original post by Quady)
Cutting basic rate to from 20% to 5% would only help the grossly rich....? Huh.....?

You really saying some on £13k/year isn't poor?
How does it help the poor?
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Quady
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#25
(Original post by Mojmeer)
How does it help the poor?
£75/year more back into the pocket of someone on £13k.
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Mojmeer
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#26
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(Original post by Quady)
£75/year more back into the pocket of someone on £13k.
not really worth doing
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Quady
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
not really worth doing
Never lived on £13k pre tax pay have you.....
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MalcolmX
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#28
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(Original post by Quady)
Never lived on £13k pre tax pay have you.....
depends. if you own your home (no mortgage left) and have no kids, 13k per year pre tax is not that bad. but the probability of owning your own home with no kids given 13k per year pre tax is low.
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Quady
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(Original post by MalcolmX)
depends. if you own your home (no mortgage left) and have no kids, 13k per year pre tax is not that bad. but the probability of owning your own home with no kids given 13k per year pre tax is low.
I mean its still pretty bad, £1,040/month. £140 council tax/water, £60 gas/lecy, £50 phone/broadband. So under £800/month before you've eaten.

Which is pretty decent in COVIDland but pretty pants normally.

You're assuming no housing costs, but a fridge on the blink and that's suddenly not a fun month.
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MalcolmX
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(Original post by Quady)
I mean its still pretty bad, £1,040/month. £140 council tax/water, £60 gas/lecy, £50 phone/broadband. So under £800/month before you've eaten.

Which is pretty decent in COVIDland but pretty pants normally.

You're assuming no housing costs, but a fridge on the blink and that's suddenly not a fun month.
my mum lived on that income for 20 years with no mortgage and a smaller version of me. it's not great but i wouldn't call it mega bad either. :P
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Quady
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(Original post by MalcolmX)
my mum lived on that income for 20 years with no mortgage and a smaller version of me. it's not great but i wouldn't call it mega bad either. :P
Would £75 a year more have been good?
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FingersXedAgain
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#32
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(Original post by Quady)
Would £75 a year more have been good?
But it doesn’t really solve the problem. The government would only do that so they could reduce tax on the rich at the same time. To me, you shouldn’t pay tax until you earn the average wage in the uk. The rest of us (me included) can afford it.
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Quady
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(Original post by FingersXedAgain)
But it doesn’t really solve the problem. The government would only do that so they could reduce tax on the rich at the same time. To me, you shouldn’t pay tax until you earn the average wage in the uk. The rest of us (me included) can afford it.
5% was a strawman, I could've said 0% which would've been the same effect as you've described.
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londonmyst
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(Original post by FingersXedAgain)
But it doesn’t really solve the problem. The government would only do that so they could reduce tax on the rich at the same time. To me, you shouldn’t pay tax until you earn the average wage in the uk. The rest of us (me included) can afford it.
The average wage is the UK is going to be a difficult one to approximate.
Even if you ignore London, people under 25 and those working within the gig economy or under some type of freelance classification.
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FingersXedAgain
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(Original post by Quady)
5% was a strawman, I could've said 0% which would've been the same effect as you've described.
Then don’t make straw man arguments. The OP definitely does not get nuanced. He still thinks everyone on the doll drives around in fancy cars with brand news iPhones.

I don’t think the government encourage work enough as I think it’s a crime that anyone who works full time is poor. So I sign every living wage petition I am handed.
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FingersXedAgain
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(Original post by londonmyst)
The average wage is the UK is going to be a difficult one to approximate.
Even if you ignore London, people under 25 and those working within the gig economy or under some type of freelance classification.
Yes but I understand it’s £28k. I wouldn’t mind paying more tax as long as those with less got more money to survive on.

As for London, I am not interested in subsidising the capital. They want people to clean there and make food then they should pay more. Not be subsidised by the government.
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Quady
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(Original post by FingersXedAgain)
Then don’t make straw man arguments. The OP definitely does not get nuanced. He still thinks everyone on the doll drives around in fancy cars with brand news iPhones.

I don’t think the government encourage work enough as I think it’s a crime that anyone who works full time is poor. So I sign every living wage petition I am handed.
I don't believe I was directing it to the OP.

I was directing it to the poster I quoted.

Was the unclear?

Do you agree with the poster I quoted?
Last edited by Quady; 1 month ago
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monkeybest
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#38
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#38
(Original post by MalcolmX)
depends. if you own your home (no mortgage left) and have no kids, 13k per year pre tax is not that bad. but the probability of owning your own home with no kids given 13k per year pre tax is low.
welfare is capped at 45k pre tax! yes which unskilled jobs pay that, not many and there are so many exclusions to the criteria its easy to see why many families choose the welfare route and can bang out a tax free income of 60-70k+ especially if one feigns back pain etc. Bang a couple of benefits babies out and you get rewarded even more for your efforts of doing f all in life!

Benefits is an addictive drug in this country once people are on them and they see how they are getting paid more to watch sky and netflix all day and smoke they forget how to work - no kidding!
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FingersXedAgain
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#39
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(Original post by monkeybest)
welfare is capped at 45k pre tax! yes which unskilled jobs pay that, not many and there are so many exclusions to the criteria its easy to see why many families choose the welfare route and can bang out a tax free income of 60-70k+ especially if one feigns back pain etc. Bang a couple of benefits babies out and you get rewarded even more for your efforts of doing f all in life!

Benefits is an addictive drug in this country once people are on them and they see how they are getting paid more to watch sky and netflix all day and smoke they forget how to work - no kidding!
Rolling my eyes. Do you get bored typing up the same things over and over or do you just cut and paste this crap?
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londonmyst
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#40
(Original post by monkeybest)
welfare is capped at 45k pre tax! yes which unskilled jobs pay that, not many and there are so many exclusions to the criteria its easy to see why many families choose the welfare route and can bang out a tax free income of 60-70k+ especially if one feigns back pain etc. Bang a couple of benefits babies out and you get rewarded even more for your efforts of doing f all in life!

Benefits is an addictive drug in this country once people are on them and they see how they are getting paid more to watch sky and netflix all day and smoke they forget how to work - no kidding!
Haven't you forgotten the benefits cap amounts applicable to most healthy unemployed persons who do not work? :rolleyes:

£13,400 a year for a single adult with no dependants living outside London.
£15,410 a year for a single adult with no dependants living within London.
£20,000 a year for a couple or single parent with dependants living outside London.
£23,000 a year for a couple or single parent with dependants living within London.

I have never voted Labour and am no fan of the welfare state.
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