User_3012
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Hi
I’d like to know exactly what an aerospace engineer does as a career, in terms of their day to day life working?

Also I’d like to know is it difficult to get into the career of becoming an aerospace engineer in the UK?

Thank you
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Helloworld_95
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It will vary a lot because there are many different areas within aerospace, the main areas will be structures, materials, aerodynamics, electronics and programming, electrical, certification, propulsion. Out of those, certification is probably the most hands on, but in any situation, a lot of the work is documentation due to the very high safety standards required in the aerospace industry. A possible exception to that is the future projects departments which Airbus and Rolls-Royce have, however these are extremely competitive.

It's usually not difficult to get into an aerospace career in the UK, though graduate programs are more competitive than other entry level jobs in aerospace engineering. It will be more difficult for the next few years however while the airline industry is recovering, though this shouldn't be a problem by the time that everyone starting this year graduates. There might be some extra competition at the end of that as there will be a buildup of aerospace grads looking for aerospace jobs, however many of these will likely settle into other careers by then, either in other rapidly developing areas of engineering like wind energy or the space industry, or go into careers outside of engineering.
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User_3012
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How easy it it for Aerospace graduates to work in computer science jobs like being a software engineer or a games developer?
This is something I might want to pursue in the future if it’s difficult to get into the aerospace companies or shall I just go with a computer science degree instead of studying a aerospace engineering degree?
Please help me with this
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User_3012
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
It will vary a lot because there are many different areas within aerospace, the main areas will be structures, materials, aerodynamics, electronics and programming, electrical, certification, propulsion. Out of those, certification is probably the most hands on, but in any situation, a lot of the work is documentation due to the very high safety standards required in the aerospace industry. A possible exception to that is the future projects departments which Airbus and Rolls-Royce have, however these are extremely competitive.

It's usually not difficult to get into an aerospace career in the UK, though graduate programs are more competitive than other entry level jobs in aerospace engineering. It will be more difficult for the next few years however while the airline industry is recovering, though this shouldn't be a problem by the time that everyone starting this year graduates. There might be some extra competition at the end of that as there will be a buildup of aerospace grads looking for aerospace jobs, however many of these will likely settle into other careers by then, either in other rapidly developing areas of engineering like wind energy or the space industry, or go into careers outside of engineering.
Also what do you mean by “graduate programs are more competitive than other entry level jobs in aerospace engineering?”

Also when you mean by extra competition due to the buildup of aerospace grads does that mean it become difficult to get into the aerospace sector?
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uberteknik
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(Original post by User_3012)
Also what do you mean by “graduate programs are more competitive than other entry level jobs in aerospace engineering?”

Also when you mean by extra competition due to the buildup of aerospace grads does that mean it become difficult to get into the aerospace sector?
More people with advanced qualifications from all over the world wanting to get a graduate job in a world class outfit.

Airlines are laying off pilots, engineers, ground staff and cabin crews, closing operations all over the world due to Covid19. The supply of engineering graduates has not stopped. More people chasing fewer jobs and graduates in competition with highly experienced staff willing to take a pay cut and elbowing out those with no experience.
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uberteknik
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Being able to jump from aerospace into games will depend on the transferable skills you acquire and the role you aspire.

Aerospace is vast as a generic term. The competitive roles enabling you to gain those skills will be in design and if you want to learn software, then you will need to specialise in one of the supply chain organisations producing sub-systems such as fly-by-wire control, engine management, radar development, data recorders, telemetry, communications, test equipment development for production etc.

Within one of those sub-system outsourced suppliers you will need to position yourself first as a software coder, tester or at the systems integration level and work your way up the ladder to systems definition and specification etc. Depending on the timing within any given projects life-cycle and the job requirement at that time, will determine where the company offers you a position.

All aerospace development is rigorously managed within very controlled environments governed by international bodies with world class standards. Much of your learning will be how to work within very rigid safety controls and procedures and within strict time and budgetary constraints.

The safety criticality of the software developed is reviewed and pulled apart then tested to destruction at every step and it is a slow process which takes years to become proficient.

Games and flight control systems are only similar because they rely on the same physics models but that is where the similarity ends. Flight control software must be fail safe, has multiple redundant systems and takes literally decades to reach maturity through the life of the aircraft. Games on the other hand, will be churned out full of bugs in a few months.
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by User_3012)
How easy it it for Aerospace graduates to work in computer science jobs like being a software engineer or a games developer?
This is something I might want to pursue in the future if it’s difficult to get into the aerospace companies or shall I just go with a computer science degree instead of studying a aerospace engineering degree?
Please help me with this
Getting into the games industry is extremely difficult, even if you have a Games Design or Computer Science degree. If you hadn't gone either of those routes then the next option would be some serious modding experience, like years worth of modding which effectively creates a new game, and it wouldn't matter what your background is if you went that route.
(Original post by User_3012)
Also what do you mean by “graduate programs are more competitive than other entry level jobs in aerospace engineering?”

Also when you mean by extra competition due to the buildup of aerospace grads does that mean it become difficult to get into the aerospace sector?
Graduate programs are structured training programs at a company which last about 2 years, during which you work in a few different departments. These give you more flexibility, are more prestigious, and better advertised than other entry level jobs so are more competitive. In other entry level jobs you will just do one job in one department and be trained to do that.

It will become more difficult, not necessarily difficult as that's relative. I don't think that getting a job in the aero industry is going to be as difficult as getting one in archaeology anytime soon.
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Joinedup
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(Original post by uberteknik)

All aerospace development is rigorously managed within very controlled environments governed by international bodies with world class standards. Much of your learning will be how to work within very rigid safety controls and procedures and within strict time and budgetary constraints.

The safety criticality of the software developed is reviewed and pulled apart then tested to destruction at every step and it is a slow process which takes years to become proficient.

Games and flight control systems are only similar because they rely on the same physics models but that is where the similarity ends. Flight control software must be fail safe, has multiple redundant systems and takes literally decades to reach maturity through the life of the aircraft. Games on the other hand, will be churned out full of bugs in a few months.
... and then there's what Boeing did with MCAS on the 737-max :headfire:

sorry to derail the thread - normally a fan of the superb safety culture in aviation :top:
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Joinedup)
... and then there's what Boeing did with MCAS on the 737-max :headfire:

sorry to derail the thread - normally a fan of the superb safety culture in aviation :top:
Quite. This is what happens when the corporation does not want to invest in a new air-frame and chooses to 'tweak' the old way beyond its original design limits with new control features buried under millions of lines of code. Rather like say a new spreadsheet that has so many 'productivity enhancing' features 99.9% of users will never need, or rather never knew existed, let alone find!

The 'independent' safety certification board were so in bed with the manufacturer that they became lazy and decisions almost 'waived' through with pressure from senior management to hit budget and timescales. Boeing it seems, failed to learn the lessons from the Space Shuttle.

One hopes the biggest lesson of all will be cutting corners to save a few millions will inevitably run the risk of causing a large loss of life and tens of billions at some point in the future, not to mention the catastrophic loss in confidence and damage to reputation.
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User_3012
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
Getting into the games industry is extremely difficult, even if you have a Games Design or Computer Science degree. If you hadn't gone either of those routes then the next option would be some serious modding experience, like years worth of modding which effectively creates a new game, and it wouldn't matter what your background is if you went that route.


Graduate programs are structured training programs at a company which last about 2 years, during which you work in a few different departments. These give you more flexibility, are more prestigious, and better advertised than other entry level jobs so are more competitive. In other entry level jobs you will just do one job in one department and be trained to do that.

It will become more difficult, not necessarily difficult as that's relative. I don't think that getting a job in the aero industry is going to be as difficult as getting one in archaeology anytime soon.
If getting into the games industry is extremely difficult, can a aerospace graduate work as a softwares engineer or any other computer science jobs? And how difficult is it for a aerospace graduate?
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by User_3012)
If getting into the games industry is extremely difficult, can a aerospace graduate work as a softwares engineer or any other computer science jobs? And how difficult is it for a aerospace graduate?
Some, yes, but overall studying CompSci will give you more options and be less of an uphill battle
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User_3012
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Thank you everyone
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