CoronaCat
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I’m doing A levels right now, all non stem subjects on course to do law at UCL if I get my predicted grades at some point in September I hope. I got a 5 in maths for my GCSE’s and all 5’s in triple science. It’s been a long time since I’ve studied science but there’s a part of me that deeply misses it. I want to do a foundational course In physics at the university of York at some point and I’m not sure if it should come before or after my law degree. Perhaps not even at all.

My father discouraged me for going for a foundational course, he said it’s too late for me and I should’ve done better in my GCSE’s.

I really have no idea what to do, are foundational courses that bad? Would it be a financial strain after my law degree? Is there even a point to studying two degrees like that?

Should I just wait for this yearning for higher education in science to go away?
0
reply
BoopleSnoot
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
A foundation degree is designed to get you onto a bachelors degree. It's not really worth anything as a qualification on its own.

Because the two degrees have very little relation it's probably best to do one or the other rather than both as it's highly unlikely that both will help in your future career; BUT...

It wouldn't be too late for you to study physics at university. It would just mean your degree is a year longer because you'll have to do the foundation degree (or an access to HE course in a related subject).

If you're wanting to make physics your career then change over from law to physics.
If you're wanting to do it purely out of personal interest then you will probably be able to do elective physics modules during your law degree and there will be clubs and societies relating to different areas of physics you may be interested in that you can join (much less expensive and more practical than doing a second degree).

So basically you need to decide if you really want to do law or not.

Its never too late to change, there is nothing wrong with foundation degrees; my partner did a foundation degree, graduated his bachelors with a 2:1 and now has a very successful career.

Best of luck and I hope you make the right choice for you.
0
reply
CoronaCat
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by BoopleSnoot)
A foundation degree is designed to get you onto a bachelors degree. It's not really worth anything as a qualification on its own.

Because the two degrees have very little relation it's probably best to do one or the other rather than both as it's highly unlikely that both will help in your future career; BUT...

It wouldn't be too late for you to study physics at university. It would just mean your degree is a year longer because you'll have to do the foundation degree (or an access to HE course in a related subject).

If you're wanting to make physics your career then change over from law to physics.
If you're wanting to do it purely out of personal interest then you will probably be able to do elective physics modules during your law degree and there will be clubs and societies relating to different areas of physics you may be interested in that you can join (much less expensive and more practical than doing a second degree).

So basically you need to decide if you really want to do law or not.

Its never too late to change, there is nothing wrong with foundation degrees; my partner did a foundation degree, graduated his bachelors with a 2:1 and now has a very successful career.

Best of luck and I hope you make the right choice for you.
Thank you so much for replying!

i was talking about a 4 year course with a foundational first year. Since your response I’ve been looking at different societies that involve physics and related stem subjects.

you have really opened by eyes. I am just unsure why the decision is so difficult to make.
0
reply
University of Bath
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by CoronaCat)
I’m doing A levels right now, all non stem subjects on course to do law at UCL if I get my predicted grades at some point in September I hope. I got a 5 in maths for my GCSE’s and all 5’s in triple science. It’s been a long time since I’ve studied science but there’s a part of me that deeply misses it. I want to do a foundational course In physics at the university of York at some point and I’m not sure if it should come before or after my law degree. Perhaps not even at all.

My father discouraged me for going for a foundational course, he said it’s too late for me and I should’ve done better in my GCSE’s.

I really have no idea what to do, are foundational courses that bad? Would it be a financial strain after my law degree? Is there even a point to studying two degrees like that?

Should I just wait for this yearning for higher education in science to go away?
Hi there,

My personal advice would be to follow your passion and do the foundation course first. It's only a year, so if you end up still wanting to do law in the end, then it's only a year of time gone. If you did a law degree and then a foundation degree, you would've spent 3-5 years studying a law degree that you don't even want in the end, so it's 3-5 years gone. Foundation courses aren't bad at all - they serve to allow people like you access onto the course you actually want.

Also, if you aren't truly passionate about law but you have this yearning for science, then it's a sign of what route you should take. Personally, I'd say it's better to follow your passion and do the foundation year and then see. That way you aren't wasting your time

In terms of finances, I can't really comment so I'd suggest looking at the Student Finance website and seeing. I'm pretty certain you can get student finance for a foundation year and then a full degree, but I think it's more difficult to get student finance for a second degree if you already had student finance for your first degree. Basically, student finance are more likely to fund you for a foundation year and then one degree, but not that likely to fund you a foundation year and a second degree if they've already funded one degree.

I hope this helps,
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
0
reply
CoronaCat
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there,

My personal advice would be to follow your passion and do the foundation course first. It's only a year, so if you end up still wanting to do law in the end, then it's only a year of time gone. If you did a law degree and then a foundation degree, you would've spent 3-5 years studying a law degree that you don't even want in the end, so it's 3-5 years gone. Foundation courses aren't bad at all - they serve to allow people like you access onto the course you actually want.

Also, if you aren't truly passionate about law but you have this yearning for science, then it's a sign of what route you should take. Personally, I'd say it's better to follow your passion and do the foundation year and then see. That way you aren't wasting your time

In terms of finances, I can't really comment so I'd suggest looking at the Student Finance website and seeing. I'm pretty certain you can get student finance for a foundation year and then a full degree, but I think it's more difficult to get student finance for a second degree if you already had student finance for your first degree. Basically, student finance are more likely to fund you for a foundation year and then one degree, but not that likely to fund you a foundation year and a second degree if they've already funded one degree.

I hope this helps,
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
Could i get the physics foundation course and the law degree on student finance?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How do you feel about your grades? Are they...

What I expected (61)
24.11%
Better than expected (53)
20.95%
Worse than expected (139)
54.94%

Watched Threads

View All