hxlimxh
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I am very interested in becoming a community pharmacist but I became side tracked by the fact that pharmacists can give flu jabs, take blood glucose, pressure and cholesterol tests from patients. I do not want to be in physical contact with patients. So is there any way to avoid this? Can I tell the boss I don't want to so that I am spared?

Thanks.
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2500_2
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(Original post by hxlimxh)
I am very interested in becoming a community pharmacist but I became side tracked by the fact that pharmacists can give flu jabs, take blood glucose, pressure and cholesterol tests from patients. I do not want to be in physical contact with patients. So is there any way to avoid this? Can I tell the boss I don't want to so that I am spared?

Thanks.
Is this a specific coronavirus concern or a wider worry?
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Cannonship
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All health care professionals have to touch patients. The patient and practitioner relationship links with touch.
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YaliaV
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Why?
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hxlimxh
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(Original post by 2500_2)
Is this a specific coronavirus concern or a wider worry?
This is not related to Coronovirus. I found it strange that a pharmacist would have to administer jabs and blood tests on patients as this is famously assigned to nurses. One of the main reasons why I'm interested in studying pharmacy instead of medicine was that I wanted to help people without touch. Not because I hate people - I would love to help people but because I just don't want to touch them lol.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by hxlimxh)
This is not related to Coronovirus. I found it strange that a pharmacist would have to administer jabs and blood tests on patients as this is famously assigned to nurses. One of the main reasons why I'm interested in studying pharmacy instead of medicine was that I wanted to help people without touch. Not because I hate people - I would love to help people but because I just don't want to touch them lol.
You have to have extra training for vaccines and blood but regardless you might have to touch a patient's rash or something similar if they ask you to look at at some point.
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0895
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(Original post by hxlimxh)
I am very interested in becoming a community pharmacist but I became side tracked by the fact that pharmacists can give flu jabs, take blood glucose, pressure and cholesterol tests from patients. I do not want to be in physical contact with patients. So is there any way to avoid this? Can I tell the boss I don't want to so that I am spared?

Thanks.
Probably not a good idea to do a healthcare degree if you don't want to touch patients. Many pharmacies offer blood pressure monitoring as a basic service.
Also, you may be called upon to help 'patch someone up', like a little old lady who has fallen over, the general pubic on a High Street, are good at bringing us cases like that!
Regarding the flu jab, some companies will not employ you as a locum if you are not trained and also willing to do flu jabs.
I totally understand where you are coming from though, as this was, I thought, an advantage of pharmacy, not having to touch patients. I do not do flu jabs, for example. But I do take blood pressure readings though which still involves fitting the cuff and sometimes helping people get their coats off and sleeves rolled up.
You may be placing limits on your career before you start, so have a good think about this. Would you be better suited to a more lab-based job?
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Xarao
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:facepalm:

This is a troll thread right?
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0895
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(Original post by Xarao)
:facepalm:

This is a troll thread right?
Possible, although when I did my degree, there were students who, although they had the grades for medicine, didn't want to touch people and hence had picked pharmacy.
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kitkatcrunchy
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(Original post by hxlimxh)
I am very interested in becoming a community pharmacist but I became side tracked by the fact that pharmacists can give flu jabs, take blood glucose, pressure and cholesterol tests from patients. I do not want to be in physical contact with patients. So is there any way to avoid this? Can I tell the boss I don't want to so that I am spared?

Thanks.
You will see and be expected to touch things that will alter your world view as a community pharmacist. If you really don't want to touch patients then I would recommend looking into non-patient-facing roles. For example managerial roles or becoming a pharmacist for online services such as Pharmacy2U or Echo.
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Cannonship
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Physios do alot more then pharmacists and nurses - they can advanced their clinical practice and become consultants - Diagnosis, inject, prescribe, order radiology and work in consultant clinics. They are one of the most autonomous professions after medicine.

Everyone is so focus on mainstream roles such as doctor or pharmacists. Pharmacy is saturated.

There are many professions within healthcare which offers so much more autonomy including: Podiatrists, Physios and Speech Therapists and Opticians.

In addition, you can work in the NHS and combine it with private practice - making good salary.
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Red Grape
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(Original post by hxlimxh)
I am very interested in becoming a community pharmacist but I became side tracked by the fact that pharmacists can give flu jabs, take blood glucose, pressure and cholesterol tests from patients. I do not want to be in physical contact with patients. So is there any way to avoid this? Can I tell the boss I don't want to so that I am spared?

Thanks.
That job is evidently not for you unless you change.
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lsc2002
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(Original post by Physiomanny)
Physios do alot more then pharmacists and nurses - they can advanced their clinical practice and become consultants - Diagnosis, inject, prescribe, order radiology and work in consultant clinics. They are one of the most autonomous professions after medicine.

Everyone is so focus on mainstream roles such as doctor or pharmacists. Pharmacy is saturated.

There are many professions within healthcare which offers so much more autonomy including: Podiatrists, Physios and Speech Therapists and Opticians.

In addition, you can work in the NHS and combine it with private practice - making good salary.
Your point is?
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Fermion.
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Maybe do something else then? As a pharmacist you may need to touch patients at some point in your life. Like, do an office job or a lab job or something if you despise touching people or better yet get over it...
Last edited by Fermion.; 4 weeks ago
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