Refused braces on the NHS, over 18 now. What can I do?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#1
Hi,

I am a 20 year old student now. I was referred to an orthodontist and recommended braces at quite a young age, but the orthodontist shut down before I was able to get them. I was then referred to a different orthodontist - this was around the time NHS regulations around braces were made stricter. If I remember correctly, I was classed as a borderline case and refused them. Since I was quite young, I didn't think to question it or get a second opinion. At the time, my father even mentioned they were being racist. Of course, this can't be proven, but I wouldn't be suprised if it was a factor.

I'm pretty sure I should have got them on the NHS. My teeth are bad, and I've been noticing problems with my bite. My dentist agrees I should have qualified. I know she isn't an orthodontist, but anyone can see I need braces when they look at my teeth.

Is there anything I can do now? I am not from a wealthy background so private treatment is a difficult option. Even a subsidised cost would be better than no help.

It's just very frustrating seeing people with teeth much better than mine qualify for treatment on the NHS, or people who don't qualify get it for free because they have contacts.

Thanks.
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Ciel.
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#2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi,

I am a 20 year old student now. I was referred to an orthodontist and recommended braces at quite a young age, but the orthodontist shut down before I was able to get them. I was then referred to a different orthodontist - this was around the time NHS regulations around braces were made stricter. If I remember correctly, I was classed as a borderline case and refused them. Since I was quite young, I didn't think to question it or get a second opinion. At the time, my father even mentioned they were being racist. Of course, this can't be proven, but I wouldn't be suprised if it was a factor.

I'm pretty sure I should have got them on the NHS. My teeth are bad, and I've been noticing problems with my bite. My dentist agrees I should have qualified. I know she isn't an orthodontist, but anyone can see I need braces when they look at my teeth.

Is there anything I can do now? I am not from a wealthy background so private treatment is a difficult option. Even a subsidised cost would be better than no help.

It's just very frustrating seeing people with teeth much better than mine qualify for treatment on the NHS, or people who don't qualify get it for free because they have contacts.

Thanks.
pay for them. it's your own fault for refusing tbh
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Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
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(Original post by Ciel.)
pay for them. it's your own fault for refusing tbh
I didn't refuse. Did you read my post? I wanted them, the orthodontist refused to give them.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I didn't refuse. Did you read my post? I wanted them, the orthodontist refused to give them.
Oh wait sorry, I realised mis-typed in my original post.
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Ciel.
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I didn't refuse. Did you read my post? I wanted them, the orthodontist refused to give them.
either way you're 20 now. just get them privately, the regular ones are only like 2k.
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1st superstar
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(Original post by Ciel.)
either way you're 20 now. just get them privately, the regular ones are only like 2k.
"Only 2K" not everyone has £2,000 laying around lol
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Anonymous #1
#7
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi,

I am a 20 year old student now. I was referred to an orthodontist and recommended braces at quite a young age, but the orthodontist shut down before I was able to get them. I was then referred to a different orthodontist - this was around the time NHS regulations around braces were made stricter. If I remember correctly, I was classed as a borderline case and refused them. Since I was quite young, I didn't think to question it or get a second opinion. At the time, my father even mentioned they were being racist. Of course, this can't be proven, but I wouldn't be suprised if it was a factor.

I'm pretty sure I should have got them on the NHS. My teeth are bad, and I've been noticing problems with my bite. My dentist agrees I should have qualified. I know she isn't an orthodontist, but anyone can see I need braces when they look at my teeth.

Is there anything I can do now? I am not from a wealthy background so private treatment is a difficult option. Even a subsidised cost would be better than no help.

It's just very frustrating seeing people with teeth much better than mine qualify for treatment on the NHS, or people who don't qualify get it for free because they have contacts.

Thanks.
Sorry, I realised my post isn't clear. The orthodontist that assessed me refused to give me them on the NHS - it wasn't my choice.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Ciel.)
either way you're 20 now. just get them privately, the regular ones are only like 2k.
they can go up to 4k, & 2k isn't 'only' to me.
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rxyaltyx
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but you're over 18 so i'm pretty sure you can't get them on the nhs anymore. the only option is to pay for them (which is super expensive)
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sorry, I realised my post isn't clear. The orthodontist that assessed me refused to give me them on the NHS - it wasn't my choice.
The guidelines for braces are even tougher now.
They’re not provided at all for cosmetic reasons.
There are 5 grades of assessment for braces. Most usually they are only given to under 18s but they can be given to adults in some cases.

Grade 4 is for more severe degrees of irregularity and these do require treatment for health reasons.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 6 mm

● reversals of the normal relationship of upper teeth which interfere with normal function greater than 2 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm

● irregularity of teeth which are more than 4 mm out of line

● less than the normal number of teeth (missing teeth) where gaps need to be closed

● open bites of more than 4 mm

● deep bites with functional problems

● more than the normal number of teeth (supernumerary teeth)

Grade 5 is for severe dental health problems

● when teeth cannot come into the mouth normally because of obstruction by crowding, additional teeth or any other cause.

● a large number of missing teeth.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 9 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm and where there are functional difficulties too

● cranio-facial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. 

If you fit either of these categories then ask your dentist for a referral to your local dental hospital.

If you don’t fit then you wouldn’t get them as an adult or child
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
The guidelines for braces are even tougher now.
They’re not provided at all for cosmetic reasons.
There are 5 grades of assessment for braces. Most usually they are only given to under 18s but they can be given to adults in some cases.

Grade 4 is for more severe degrees of irregularity and these do require treatment for health reasons.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 6 mm

● reversals of the normal relationship of upper teeth which interfere with normal function greater than 2 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm

● irregularity of teeth which are more than 4 mm out of line

● less than the normal number of teeth (missing teeth) where gaps need to be closed

● open bites of more than 4 mm

● deep bites with functional problems

● more than the normal number of teeth (supernumerary teeth)

Grade 5 is for severe dental health problems

● when teeth cannot come into the mouth normally because of obstruction by crowding, additional teeth or any other cause.

● a large number of missing teeth.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 9 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm and where there are functional difficulties too

● cranio-facial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. 

If you fit either of these categories then ask your dentist for a referral to your local dental hospital.

If you don’t fit then you wouldn’t get them as an adult or child
my upper front teeth protruded about 6mm exactly :/ do only one of the conditions need to be met?
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Anonymous)
my upper front teeth protruded about 6mm exactly :/ do only one of the conditions need to be met?
Yes.
You should speak to your dentist
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Moonbow
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
The guidelines for braces are even tougher now.
They’re not provided at all for cosmetic reasons.
There are 5 grades of assessment for braces. Most usually they are only given to under 18s but they can be given to adults in some cases.

Grade 4 is for more severe degrees of irregularity and these do require treatment for health reasons.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 6 mm

● reversals of the normal relationship of upper teeth which interfere with normal function greater than 2 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm

● irregularity of teeth which are more than 4 mm out of line

● less than the normal number of teeth (missing teeth) where gaps need to be closed

● open bites of more than 4 mm

● deep bites with functional problems

● more than the normal number of teeth (supernumerary teeth)

Grade 5 is for severe dental health problems

● when teeth cannot come into the mouth normally because of obstruction by crowding, additional teeth or any other cause.

● a large number of missing teeth.

● upper front teeth that protrude more than 9 mm

● lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm and where there are functional difficulties too

● cranio-facial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. 

If you fit either of these categories then ask your dentist for a referral to your local dental hospital.

If you don’t fit then you wouldn’t get them as an adult or child
I got mine due to my roots being ridiculously short
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
Yes.
You should speak to your dentist
thank you
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Anonymous)
thank you
You’re welcome
I can’t promise anything but you’ve nothing to lose by talking to them
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