What is better? LLB Law degree or a BA Law Degree?

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LostLawyah
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What is better? LLB Law degree or a BA Law Degree?


i am a little confused about this.

does it really matter if its a 'BA LAW' or 'LLB LAW' degree

and how much does it effect afterwards, what's the difference?

and which is better?

Thanks for your answers :eek:

hehe seriously a lost lawyer, aint i? :rolleyes:
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NW8_SW1_EC3
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LL.B is a qualifying law degree.
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faber niger
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BA Law degrees are only from Oxford and Cambridge; that aside, they are the same effectively as LLB degrees. Take from that what you wish.
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Yasmin2K8
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(Original post by jismith1989)
BA Law degrees are only from Oxford and Cambridge; that aside, they are the same effectively as LLB degrees. Take from that what you wish.
Your wrong actually.
BA Law is not limited to Oxbridge and is a Bachelor of Arts and available at many universities. It is usually Law (and) combined with another subject and doesnt give you automatic qualification as a lawyer.

BA Honors that is.
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faber niger
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(Original post by Yasmin2K8)
Your wrong actually.
BA Law is not limited to Oxbridge and is a Bachelor of Arts and available at many universities. It is usually Law combined with another subject and doesnt give you automatic qualification as a lawyer.
Well, yes, but I was just talking straight law. It is, however, a good point. Though most joint honours Law degrees that I have seen do actually give qualification to practice, assuming that the appropriate modules are taken.

P.S. It's you're.
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Sazzy890
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LLB is qualifying law degree, meaning that you can go on to do training as a solictor or barrister afterwards, whereas BA isn't. So if you aren't looking for a career as a solicitor or barrister, you can do the BA. If you want to be a solicitor or barrister, or still unsure what you want to do with a law degree, I'd do the LLB.
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emmings
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(Original post by Sazzy890)
LLB is qualifying law degree, meaning that you can go on to do training as a solictor or barrister afterwards, whereas BA isn't. So if you aren't looking for a career as a solicitor or barrister, you can do the BA. If you want to be a solicitor or barrister, or still unsure what you want to do with a law degree, I'd do the LLB.
Wrong, wrong, wrong - this view is posted about incorrectly on the forum so much! A degree is a qualifying law degree if it covers the 7 foundation subjects. It does not matter a jot whether it is called a BA or an LLB. At Nottingham, I think you can choose which one you want, and if you pick the BA route, you have more non-law modules open to you, but as long as you still take the 7 modules, then you're fine. Conversely at KCL, they only award LLBs, but you can choose your modules yourself after first year and it isn't compulsory to do the foundation modules - a few friends who decided early on that they didn't want to go into law as a career picked others, and they have a non-qualifying LLB.
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Absinth
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There isn't any difference between the BA and LLB in terms of which is a qualifying law degree. None is "better" than the other. The only thing that will really affect your degree is (as said above) if or not you pick the seven "qualifying" law modules: EU, contract, equity and trusts, tort, public, land and criminal.
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Cowz
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(Original post by LostLawyah)
What is better? LLB Law degree or a BA Law Degree?


i am a little confused about this.

does it really matter if its a 'BA LAW' or 'LLB LAW' degree

and how much does it effect afterwards, what's the difference?

and which is better?

Thanks for your answers :eek:

hehe seriously a lost lawyer, aint i? :rolleyes:
And it begins. The birth of the "could my qualifications be any better" law student.

I'd forgive if you had asked, 'is a BA law degree a qualifying law degree?' But oh no, you had to ask, 'how much does it effect afterwards?' What, do you really think there is some sort of covert code that only lawyers are privy to?

Personally I think LLB is much weaker than the more academic sounding BA but lawyers being lawyers just had to invent their own qualification which says, 'Hey look at me, I studied law!'
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Cowz
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(Original post by emmings)
a few friends who decided early on that they didn't want to go into law as a career picked others, and they have a non-qualifying LLB.
Sounds like a daft choice. Why not just leave themselves the option of going into law as an insurance option? It's not like taking the non-qualifying route was going to make their degree any stronger. Makes it sound a lot weaker if anything.

I mean if you study law, you study law right?
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emmings
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(Original post by Cowz)
Sounds like a daft choice. Why not just leave themselves the option of going into law as an insurance option? It's not like taking the non-qualifying route was going to make their degree any stronger. Makes it sound a lot weaker if anything.
If they don't want to go into law, then what does it matter to other potential graduate employers which modules they took? It's not as if your degree certificate says on it "Non-qualifying LLB". The only thing which makes a degree weaker is the grades achieved in modules. If they thought they could achieve better grades in other modules, then it sounds to me like a sensible decision.

(Original post by Cowz)
I mean if you study law, you study law right?
Not sure what you mean by that - when I say 'other modules', I still meant legal modules, just not the qualifying ones.

I don't think going into law, with the intense competition to get particularly pupillage and also TCs, can really be anyone's 'insurance' option!
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Lemons
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A LLB is a qualifying law degree while a BA isn't necessarily. It can be though but not only the Oxbridge ones, I remember that I found a few BAs that let you study law with modules from other subjects and they also let you pick the law modules you wanted to do. This means that as long as you pick the 7 (I think it's 7) "core" modules needed for a law degree to be qualifying then you won't need to do a conversion course.

I don't know if that's for all BA Law degrees though, if you're interested in doing one, you should check the unis website carefully and see what it says.

O, and in terms of which one is better it probably depends on whether you're interested in doing straight law or not.
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Cowz
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(Original post by Lemons)
A LLB is a qualifying law degree while a BA isn't necessarily.
Which is of course completely wrong as emmings as already pointed out.
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Cowz
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(Original post by Lemons)
O, and in terms of which one is better it probably depends on whether you're interested in doing straight law or not.
Yet again, a completely dumb and incorrect statement. You do know that no advice is better than bad advice right?
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Cowz
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(Original post by emmings)
If they don't want to go into law, then what does it matter to other potential graduate employers which modules they took? It's not as if your degree certificate says on it "Non-qualifying LLB". The only thing which makes a degree weaker is the grades achieved in modules. If they thought they could achieve better grades in other modules, then it sounds to me like a sensible decision.
Except if they are ever asked to give a transcript, it will be obvious they opted not to take qualifying modules. That looks suspicious and sort of suggests, like you said, perhaps they couldn't handle the harder modules. Maybe not though. Especially given most (non-legal) employers don't really ask for transcripts.

I was more thinking about the future anyway. Maybe 5 years from now they'll have a change of heart and wish they'd taken the extra modules.
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Profesh
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The L.L.B, as distinct from the B.A. (except at Oxford and Cambridge), simply denotes a qualifying law-degree. There's really little more to it than that.

That said, if your B.A. simply signifies a watered-down L.L.B. (rather than a combined discipline), you'll probably find that its overall prestige is degraded as a consequence.
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emmings
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(Original post by Cowz)
Except if they are ever asked to give a transcript, it will be obvious they opted not to take qualifying modules. That looks suspicious and sort of suggests, like you said, perhaps they couldn't handle the harder modules. Maybe not though. Especially given most (non-legal) employers don't really ask for transcripts.

I was more thinking about the future anyway. Maybe 5 years from now they'll have a change of heart and wish they'd taken the extra modules.
I guess so, though I doubt most non-legal grad employers know which modules are qualifying and which aren't. I agree it's not a decision I'd have taken - it makes sense to keep your options open - but equally for at least one of these people she really, really hated black letter law, knew she should have probably dropped out in the first year but got to the stage where it made more sense to stick it out. She chose not to take Trusts or Tort and instead took Law and Social Theory and Moral Philosophy (alongside Juris which was compulsory) and therefore more or less did entirely philosophy in her final year, which suited her much better. Definitely the exception though, rather than the rule.
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Cowz
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(Original post by emmings)
I guess so, though I doubt most non-legal grad employers know which modules are qualifying and which aren't. I agree it's not a decision I'd have taken - it makes sense to keep your options open - but equally for at least one of these people she really, really hated black letter law, knew she should have probably dropped out in the first year but got to the stage where it made more sense to stick it out. She chose not to take Trusts or Tort and instead took Law and Social Theory and Moral Philosophy (alongside Juris which was compulsory) and therefore more or less did entirely philosophy in her final year, which suited her much better. Definitely the exception though, rather than the rule.
So in essence, she was paying for choosing the wrong university subject for her?
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emmings
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(Original post by Cowz)
So in essence, she was paying for choosing the wrong university subject for her?
Yep!

Anyway, the whole story was just to demonstrate that it is possible to get a non-qualifying LLB, contrary to what people assume (and Profesh has continued to state above, despite all of this!)
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Cowz
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(Original post by emmings)
Yep!

Anyway, the whole story was just to demonstrate that it is possible to get a non-qualifying LLB, contrary to what people assume (and Profesh has continued to state above, despite all of this!)
Aye, it's an interesting story.
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