mulu89
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
The reaction goes like this:

H2SO4 + 2NaOH ---> Na2SO4 + 2H2O

so is the ionic equation

H+ + OH- ---> H2O
or
2H+ + 2OH- --> 2H2O
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evissa
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#2
first one
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fait
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I'm pretty sure it's the last one. In the reaction, it's '2NaOH'.
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Plato123
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The initial equation isn't balanced...
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mulu89
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my mistake... i edited the question. so is it the first one or the second one.
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EierVonSatan
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they are both fine really, but by convention the top one

x + y = z is the same as 2x+2y = 2z
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LurkerintheDark
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Could someone refresh my memory and tell me how you deduce ionic equations again? (My chemistry has become a little rusty)
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by LurkerintheDark)
Could someone refresh my memory and tell me how you deduce ionic equations again? (My chemistry has become a little rusty)
1) Write out the normal equation: NaOH(aq) + HCl(aq) ---> H2O(l) + NaCl(aq)
2) Split up all the ions: Na+(aq) + OH-(aq) + H+(aq) + Cl-(aq) ----> H2O(l) + Na+(aq) + Cl-(aq)
3) Cancel the ions on both sides: OH-(aq) + H+(aq) ---> H2O(l)
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LurkerintheDark
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
1) Write out the normal equation: NaOH(aq) + HCl(aq) ---> H2O(l) + NaCl(aq)
2) Split up all the ions: Na+(aq) + OH-(aq) + H+(aq) + Cl-(aq) ----> H2O(l) + Na+(aq) + Cl-(aq)
3) Cancel the ions on both sides: OH-(aq) + H+(aq) ---> H2O(l)
Ahh, cheers, mate. I thought it was something like that; the ions which are cancelled are known as 'spectator ions', aren't they?

By the way, why doesn't water water split into seperate ions? And is it true that in a regular equation, the precipitate on the R.H.S. isn't split into ions during cancellation, and remains a compound? Thanks.
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by LurkerintheDark)
Ahh, cheers, mate. I thought it was something like that; the ions which are canceled are known as 'spectator ions', aren't they?
yep

By the way, why doesn't water water split into separate ions? And is it true that in a regular equation, the precipitate on the R.H.S. isn't split into ions during cancellation, and remains a compound? Thanks.
Water is covalent not ionic. If you get a precipitate then it doesn't dissolve in the solvent so it stays a solid...so yes :p:
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LurkerintheDark
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
yep



Water is covalent not ionic. If you get a precipitate then it doesn't dissolve in the solvent so it stays a solid...so yes :p:
Aa--haaaa; thanks for the enlightenment, man. So, in a equation with hydrogen molecules, you wouldn't be able to seperate them into seperate ions because it is a covalent molecule? Of course...
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mulu89
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correct, if you're talking about H2 molecules. but if its about hydrogen ions (eg HCl dissolved in aq solution) then its something different altogether.
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ashley193
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basically can someone just explain the whole question to me. I am so confused
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ChemistryWebsite
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(Original post by ashley193)
basically can someone just explain the whole question to me. I am so confused
On Halloween you have dug up a 10 year old thread!
The thread has more the one question in the end.

Can I suggest you start a new thread with just the question you have today? 😁
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Sheriana Lens
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Water isn't split into ions because water is a liquid and the others are in the aqueous state, so the state that is common in all elements are splitted into ions but the one that is different stays the same.
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