temo2
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I've received offers from both University of law and BPP for the LPC and I'm not sure which to take. I've seen that BPP doesn't do open book tests whereas Ulaw does which I'm thinking may make tests less stressful but I'm not sure. Does anyone have experience of either - is one course harder than the other or is teaching different in any way?
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M393939
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Hi, I am in the same situation lol. I applied to both in the Manchester campuses and was given an unconditional offer by both. I was leaning to Ulaw because I felt they cared more (from what I saw in their website and videos) and because they did events in my uni and I visited the Guildford campus. And because also of open book exam...

I am currently confused because BPP offered a bursary to reduce my tuition fees.
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todareistodo
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Both BPP and Ulaw are both open book exams and I know you can do them online with BPP, i think its the same for Ulaw.

BPP also work with the majority of law firms so im guessing their courses have direct input from firms but Ulaw seems to work with some as well.
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temo2
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(Original post by M393939)
Hi, I am in the same situation lol. I applied to both in the Manchester campuses and was given an unconditional offer by both. I was leaning to Ulaw because I felt they cared more (from what I saw in their website and videos) and because they did events in my uni and I visited the Guildford campus. And because also of open book exam...

I am currently confused because BPP offered a bursary to reduce my tuition fees.
Yeah I was leaning towards ULaw but then was offered a bursary too by BPP so now I’m confused
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by temo2)
I've received offers from both University of law and BPP for the LPC and I'm not sure which to take. I've seen that BPP doesn't do open book tests whereas Ulaw does which I'm thinking may make tests less stressful but I'm not sure. Does anyone have experience of either - is one course harder than the other or is teaching different in any way?
Hi, I've just completed my studies at ULaw so I would be happy to answer any specific questions you might have!

I would say on a general note, that neither course should be too different from the other, or one 'harder' than the other, because ultimately the LPC is a practical and professional course which aims to prepare you for starting work as a trainee solicitor.

My own experience at ULaw is that the course is hard, but not because of the content itself more because the course is intense - this will be the case wherever you take it unfortunately, you have a lot of material to cover in a relatively short period of time. Even though the course was hard in this sense, I thought it was manageable and the tutors were always on hand to help. Another aspect of the course which is hard is that the majority of the learning will have to be done independently. You have to prepare in advance for workshops, which often requires a lot of reading, and then the two-hour sessions are there to go over your preparation, to do workshops tasks during the class and raise any questions or problems you encountered during your reading etc.

Please let me know if you have any more questions about the LPC/ULaw

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds campus)
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M393939
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(Original post by The University of Law Students)
Hi, I've just completed my studies at ULaw so I would be happy to answer any specific questions you might have!

I would say on a general note, that neither course should be too different from the other, or one 'harder' than the other, because ultimately the LPC is a practical and professional course which aims to prepare you for starting work as a trainee solicitor.

My own experience at ULaw is that the course is hard, but not because of the content itself more because the course is intense - this will be the case wherever you take it unfortunately, you have a lot of material to cover in a relatively short period of time. Even though the course was hard in this sense, I thought it was manageable and the tutors were always on hand to help. Another aspect of the course which is hard is that the majority of the learning will have to be done independently. You have to prepare in advance for workshops, which often requires a lot of reading, and then the two-hour sessions are there to go over your preparation, to do workshops tasks during the class and raise any questions or problems you encountered during your reading etc.

Please let me know if you have any more questions about the LPC/ULaw

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds campus)
Hi Jess,

I have a couple of questions about the LPC/ULaw

1.What would you say that makes ULaw special than other providers? many people pinpoint that ULaw has open book exams, but I heard BPP also do that, so I am a bit lost on this point lol.

2. How does ULaw help students if they have any issues outside the class? like mental health issues for example?

3. What would you say the best study mod 2 or 4 days a week? I like the idea of 2 days per a week, but I feel that I would be bored and unmotivated rest of the week.

4. Any tips before starting the course? or any preparation I can do for now?

Thank you !
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17Student17
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They are both good. My daughters were at BPP in London for the LPC and we found many more good City firms sponsored students there which perhaps affects the student body but that is not a major issue. Either is fine. I marginally prefer BPP.
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AspireInspire
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Both are highly respected, both have good careers services. Exams will be similar as only some of the ULaw ones are open book and some are closed book.

Honestly the only factor that people should consider if they aren't doing the LPC whilst sponsored are the course fees. ULaw is more expensive than BPP, but both offer scholarships/bursaries. I'd choose the course which costs the least if you are certain you want to do the LPC without being sponsored.
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17Student17
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Also BPP's 2020 course is different this year from its previous one - two terms (unless you do a masters) so you are "free" by May and exams at end of first time in those subjects and end of second term in the second term's subjects I believe. So do compare the new BPP GDL with UoL not the old BPP.
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M393939
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(Original post by AspireInspire)
Both are highly respected, both have good careers services. Exams will be similar as only some of the ULaw ones are open book and some are closed book.

Honestly the only factor that people should consider if they aren't doing the LPC whilst sponsored are the course fees. ULaw is more expensive than BPP, but both offer scholarships/bursaries. I'd choose the course which costs the least if you are certain you want to do the LPC without being sponsored.
So Ulaw has has some open book exams unlike BPP which has none, right ? sorry I am confused on this point.

I got offered a bursary from BPP, but they seem or intend to make the first term online, unlike Ulaw where they seem reluctant that they will open their campus. So, I am not sure which one to go with.

What about the amount of students, which usually has more ?
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todareistodo
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(Original post by M393939)
So Ulaw has has some open book exams unlike BPP which has none, right ? sorry I am confused on this point.

I got offered a bursary from BPP, but they seem or intend to make the first term online, unlike Ulaw where they seem reluctant that they will open their campus. So, I am not sure which one to go with.

What about the amount of students, which usually has more ?
I am hopefully going to BPP this September (application submitted) but I had heard similar about the books so I asked the direct question on the book policy during the initial stages. They said that you are permitted to take statue books, codes of practice and copies of procedure rules into all LPC exams with BPP.

I also dug out the email from the person in admissions i was speaking to who followed up with some more detail - coped and paste below for some more context:

“Students are permitted to take statue books, codes of practice and copies of procedure rules into all LPC exams with them. We do not have a closed book policy. Students often underestimate the value of this. Taking an LPC exam is markedly different from that on the LLB or GDL. The majority of the law required for the LPC comes from these permitted sources as opposed to case law. This means that there is little to no “law” to actually memorise for the exam, and so instead students can focus revision on when and how to apply it. This mirrors most accurately what it would be like in practice.

Many of the skills based exams on the LPC would not benefit from taking your own notes, as this would not be compatible with the skill that is being assessed. In these situations students benefit instead from being given plenty of opportunities to practice, including mock exams in realistic conditions.”

I don't know about the student volume.

Also I was told that i would be starting online returning to the classroom as soon as it was safe to do so but the study space and library would be open end of September.
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KamkamAP
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(Original post by temo2)
I've received offers from both University of law and BPP for the LPC and I'm not sure which to take. I've seen that BPP doesn't do open book tests whereas Ulaw does which I'm thinking may make tests less stressful but I'm not sure. Does anyone have experience of either - is one course harder than the other or is teaching different in any way?
I studied GDL at BPP and currently doing LPC at UoL, both distance learning and i prefer BPP as their online VLE system and way of teaching was better. More interactive live classes with other student in the room where you can ask the tutor or other students live. Their admin and student support were more responsive and accurate. Sometimes i wait for day and have to send chasers to UOL to get a response. While the fact is GDL is more intensive than LPC, at UoL i have to submit assignment each week which get assessed by the tutor and mailed back. I did do the induction week in person live class which was really beneficial. With the covid situation even UOL is moving a lot of regular classes online. BPP does not offer LPC online/distance learning, only in person regular classes hence i had to opt for UOL. BPP and UoL both have plenty resources available online portal. But at BPP the extra interaction helped wt exam tips etc. I would definitely recomend a part time basis if you are working and studying. At full time you need to submit apprx 4 assignment per week (their timetable states 42hr per week study requirement) and frequent mocks and exams. Both university do the open book. But open book are equally tough if you are not familiar with all of the content and questions are never straightforward. So far ok at UOL but I would have preferred BPP.
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temo2
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(Original post by KamkamAP)
I studied GDL at BPP and currently doing LPC at UoL, both distance learning and i prefer BPP as their online VLE system and way of teaching was better. More interactive live classes with other student in the room where you can ask the tutor or other students live. Their admin and student support were more responsive and accurate. Sometimes i wait for day and have to send chasers to UOL to get a response. While the fact is GDL is more intensive than LPC, at UoL i have to submit assignment each week which get assessed by the tutor and mailed back. I did do the induction week in person live class which was really beneficial. With the covid situation even UOL is moving a lot of regular classes online. BPP does not offer LPC online/distance learning, only in person regular classes hence i had to opt for UOL. BPP and UoL both have plenty resources available online portal. But at BPP the extra interaction helped wt exam tips etc. I would definitely recomend a part time basis if you are working and studying. At full time you need to submit apprx 4 assignment per week (their timetable states 42hr per week study requirement) and frequent mocks and exams. Both university do the open book. But open book are equally tough if you are not familiar with all of the content and questions are never straightforward. So far ok at UOL but I would have preferred BPP.
That’s so helpful thank you
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M393939
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(Original post by todareistodo)
I am hopefully going to BPP this September (application submitted) but I had heard similar about the books so I asked the direct question on the book policy during the initial stages. They said that you are permitted to take statue books, codes of practice and copies of procedure rules into all LPC exams with BPP.

I also dug out the email from the person in admissions i was speaking to who followed up with some more detail - coped and paste below for some more context:

“Students are permitted to take statue books, codes of practice and copies of procedure rules into all LPC exams with them. We do not have a closed book policy. Students often underestimate the value of this. Taking an LPC exam is markedly different from that on the LLB or GDL. The majority of the law required for the LPC comes from these permitted sources as opposed to case law. This means that there is little to no “law” to actually memorise for the exam, and so instead students can focus revision on when and how to apply it. This mirrors most accurately what it would be like in practice.

Many of the skills based exams on the LPC would not benefit from taking your own notes, as this would not be compatible with the skill that is being assessed. In these situations students benefit instead from being given plenty of opportunities to practice, including mock exams in realistic conditions.”

I don't know about the student volume.

Also I was told that i would be starting online returning to the classroom as soon as it was safe to do so but the study space and library would be open end of September.
Thanks this was really helpful, if I may ask which campus are you going to ?
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todareistodo
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(Original post by M393939)
Thanks this was really helpful, if I may ask which campus are you going to ?
Im going to their Holborn campus.
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M393939
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(Original post by todareistodo)
Im going to their Holborn campus.
Good luck!
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ManofBabylon
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Interesting piece on BPP not providing hard-copies of course materials: http://www.legalcheek.com/2020/07/bp...rse-materials/

Worth a read before you pay 17k.
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by M393939)
Hi Jess,

I have a couple of questions about the LPC/ULaw

1.What would you say that makes ULaw special than other providers? many people pinpoint that ULaw has open book exams, but I heard BPP also do that, so I am a bit lost on this point lol.

2. How does ULaw help students if they have any issues outside the class? like mental health issues for example?

3. What would you say the best study mod 2 or 4 days a week? I like the idea of 2 days per a week, but I feel that I would be bored and unmotivated rest of the week.

4. Any tips before starting the course? or any preparation I can do for now?

Thank you !
Hi, happy to answer your questions!

In response to your first question, what I have found to make ULaw special after 2 years studying here is the tutors and the resources. The tutors at ULaw are great at delivering the material in a way that is neither spoon feeding nor leaving you completely to your own devices. All the tutors have been practising solicitors/barristers and some still are, so the workshops are delivered in a way which make clear how what your learning will apply in practice. Everything has a practical focus. And the material you are provided with is very comprehensive, you will have absolutely everything you need, and also pointed towards further reading on all the topics.

As for the second, we have student counselling services for precisely that reason. Mental health is so important and ULaw definitely prioritise the mental health of its students, all the staff at ULaw are there to find you the right support whenever you need it. You also receive regular emails reminding you about these services and how to reach out if you are struggling.

In terms of the 2/4 day, I have experience of the 2 day but I have friends who took the 4 day. I think it's actually a valid point about being unmotivated over the other days, it depends on what kind of worker you are. I sometimes found that I was drained the day after having 2 workshops in one day, so effectively had 2 days in a week where I felt relatively unproductive! Whereas my friend noted that getting into the uni building 4 days a week was helpful because they would stay in the library after/before the 1 workshop for the day and prepare for the others/consolidate learning etc. I think the choice is often dictated by travel needs but if you are able to make it in 4 days a week and it is not an issue for travel, you might find it suits you more!

Finally, in terms of preparation, there is nothing you need to do specifically unless you have been emailed with some information from the university. I would recommend brushing up on some of the basics you learnt during your degree, particularly Contract law as this you will find comes up a lot! You could also read an introduction to business law - I found this module the hardest to get to grips with.

Hope this helps!

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds campus)
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