Voss.gloss20
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hey,

So I found that I have forgot so so much since school/ sixth form closed due to Corona. Near the start of lock-down, I revised a couple chapters and again a the next month. However, I feel like I just don't remember the content as well as I do when I revise it initially.

The reason I didn't go back to it sooner was because I was trying to go over everything and I don't know how to plan the timetable so that I continuously go back to content I've already learnt as well as learn new content and then practise what I have learnt through exam questions etc.

[A- levels]

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,

V
0
reply
charles brandeis
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Firstly what A levels are you doing? make yourself a timetable that you know is manageable, otherwise you will end up not doing a stitch.
1
reply
Voss.gloss20
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by charles brandeis)
Firstly what A levels are you doing? make yourself a timetable that you know is manageable, otherwise you will end up not doing a stitch.
Maths, physics, chemistry and psychology
0
reply
charles brandeis
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Voss.gloss20)
Maths, physics, chemistry and psychology
Wow you must be very clever, as most people take 3. write flash cards,either question on one side and answer on other side or for science ones write Symbol on one side and what they mean on other side. Good luck!!!
1
reply
Voss.gloss20
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by charles brandeis)
Wow you must be very clever, as most people take 3. write flash cards,either question on one side and answer on other side or for science ones write Symbol on one side and what they mean on other side. Good luck!!!
Ok thanks I’ll try these ☺️
0
reply
jadefn
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
I agree that sticking to a timetable is really helpful, and make sure you break up your modules/subjects so your're not overloading yourself with information. This may also be of help https://www.whatuni.com/advice/sixth...-levels/60152/
1
reply
Voss.gloss20
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by jadefn)
I agree that sticking to a timetable is really helpful, and make sure you break up your modules/subjects so your're not overloading yourself with information. This may also be of help https://www.whatuni.com/advice/sixth...-levels/60152/
Thank you
0
reply
Pixel_Ninja48
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
For maths what I did was to bash out as many past papers as humanly possible. After a while, you will begin to recognize the style of questions and when you go into the exam it feels like you've done the question before, just with different numbers. This website is absolutely amazing: https://alevelmathsrevision.com/math...xam-questions/

For physics, I did the same as maths but I focussed a lot more on the mark schemes. Often in the mark schemes, they have bold words or underlined words, try your best to remember these. The 6 markers in A level physics, they tend to repeat themselves quite often, you will notice this the more you do past papers, I just tried my best to remember every single bullet point, when I see the question in another past paper I simply regurgitate what I can remember. Also learn the definitions inside out, easy 1-2 markers.

For chemistry, do the same as physics.

As other people have said, make a timetable and try your best to stick to them, in each slot try to bash out a past paper, get a question wrong? Look it up in the textbook and refresh yourself on that topic until you understand it completely. That's all the advice I can give you, once you finish all the past papers on your exam board start to move onto others + textbooks etc.
1
reply
Voss.gloss20
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Pixel_Ninja48)
For maths what I did was to bash out as many past papers as humanly possible. After a while, you will begin to recognize the style of questions and when you go into the exam it feels like you've done the question before, just with different numbers. This website is absolutely amazing: https://alevelmathsrevision.com/math...xam-questions/

For physics, I did the same as maths but I focussed a lot more on the mark schemes. Often in the mark schemes, they have bold words or underlined words, try your best to remember these. The 6 markers in A level physics, they tend to repeat themselves quite often, you will notice this the more you do past papers, I just tried my best to remember every single bullet point, when I see the question in another past paper I simply regurgitate what I can remember. Also learn the definitions inside out, easy 1-2 markers.

For chemistry, do the same as physics.

As other people have said, make a timetable and try your best to stick to them, in each slot try to bash out a past paper, get a question wrong? Look it up in the textbook and refresh yourself on that topic until you understand it completely. That's all the advice I can give you, once you finish all the past papers on your exam board start to move onto others + textbooks etc.
Thanks soo much!! Having a look at that website now. ☺️
0
reply
charles brandeis
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
what revision tips can you give for A levels in general
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How do you feel about your grades? Are they...

What I expected (165)
25%
Better than expected (133)
20.15%
Worse than expected (362)
54.85%

Watched Threads

View All