Edexcel A Level Politics - How to structure 30 marker source questions??!

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Sorara
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I tried searching for advice on how to answer and structure 30 mark source questions, but there wasn't a lot out there.

I often find it difficult to expand on my arguments if I find a point in the source.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated - thank you
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mint.skyscrapers
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Have you looked at the mark schemes on the exam boards website? They often explain what is needed at each level to gain the marks and tell you what points you need to put in to get the marks.
A good trick is to imagine that someone is asking why after every sentence that you write.
Or if you make a mini plan for revision before writing the question using arrows to explain what the argument is.
i did the edexcel course a few years ago so not sure of the structure needed for the source questions
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Omgcobbly
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source questions are not easy, but try and have an argument and counter from the source on each of your points, embed quotes.

if you find it hard to expand on your arguments then use an example. a good formula is to do a quote, explain the point in the quote, prove this with an example and relate it back to the point. repeat for the counter.

here's an example from an essay I did on devolution:
Finally, the source acknowledges that local councils would want different powers and proposes that ‘Authorities bid for ‘devolution deals’’ that vary from area to area from a ‘menu of options’. This would help local authorities to focus on what the local area needs the most and provides a solution to some of the issues presented earlier in the essay. Such ‘menus’ have already been created in Wales and Scotland, for example the Wales Act 2014 that allowed for welsh-specific laws and the Scotland acts 2012 and 2016 which gave more power over some taxes, speed limits and social security powers. As these regions are in control of differing devolved powers, it seems the logical next step to extend these to English authorities. A problem with this in England is that there is disagreement over ‘what form devolution should take’. Proposals of an ‘arbitrary’ regional stricture with little law-making powers was unpopular, for example in the 2004 referendum potential powers included the promotion of health, safety and security and improving the availability of good housing. This grants a relatively small amount of power that many could have deemed not worth it, and an alternative has not yet been proposed by government. As a result, there should be continuing devolution of English areas following the devolution of other areas of the UK, but this is difficult when there is not an agreed upon form or sets of powers that would be available.
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Audrey18
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Omgcobbly

was this for edexcel?
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Omgcobbly
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(Original post by Audrey18)
Omgcobbly

was this for edexcel?
yes
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