Really can’t decide between Aerospace engineering or Computer science?

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User_3012
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Hi everyone,
I don’t know which subject to choose between these two (Aerospace or Computer science)?

I think I would enjoy the maths/classes in engineering, but I don’t know if il like the lab work, and I will not like to do the lab reports for Aerospace engineering, although I think I might have to do lab reports for CS as-well but not too sure.

I don’t like to do practical work, instead I am more academic, and would rather learn the theory and do the maths
However, one thing I hate in maths is proofs which is why I dropped maths.

Coding is interesting, but I don’t think il enjoy the discrete math and the other things you learn (algorithms, data structures) compared to what is learnt in engineering.

By the way, I have learnt how to use programming languages like c, html, css using YouTube, but certainty not an expert.

Can someone advice me on what to do and how to decide between these two subjects please?
I really need help
Thanks
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Student-95
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Practical work will be a very small part of most engineering degrees if that's your only concern.
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User_3012
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(Original post by Student-95)
Practical work will be a very small part of most engineering degrees if that's your only concern.
Even for the second and third year?
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Student-95
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(Original post by User_3012)
Even for the second and third year?
Yes. Typically you would only do lots of practical in your master's year if you choose a practical project.
Last edited by Student-95; 4 weeks ago
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MalcolmX
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there was someone on here who did aerospace engineering and now works at google as a software engineer. not sure if he still comes on here, bigboateng_
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User_3012
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(Original post by Student-95)
Yes. Typically you would only do lots of practical in your master's year if you choose a practical project.
Hmmm, that’s good to hear
Thank you for replying
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bigboateng_
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(Original post by MalcolmX)
there was someone on here who did aerospace engineering and now works at google as a software engineer. not sure if he still comes on here, bigboateng_
I come here occasionally yes xD

User_3012 if you dont think you would enjoy discrete mathematics/ds/algorithms then probs comp sci is not for you. Depending on what area you end up as a software engineer, you wont need to use any of it, but its certainly required to pass the job interviews and useful to know when actually working as a software engineer. Personally I found aerospace boring, theres way too much content to even make it enjoyable. Yes you take a module on orbital mechanics and everyone gets excited because "rocket science" but next you are balls deep into wing aerodynamics and none of the maths makes sense or doing boring labs or materials module learning about metals. Where as computer science you will actually get to enjoy the content if you want to and it will actually get you internships and hence a job in the end. Also not forgetting comp sci pays crazy amounts where as traditional mech/aero has lower salaries. As I posted in many places on this website, I did aero @ southampton uni but got internship at google 2 months into first year and pretty much decided to bun aerospace engineering (i completed the degree) as my interests was more in software. I think Im enjoying life way more now working as a programmer, I'm the cto of a tech startup I started with some friends back in uni 2 years ago and we raised some funding and now based in new york. Im writing this reply at 12:05 am New york time as Im procrastinating on some unit tests
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User_3012
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(Original post by bigboateng_)
I come here occasionally yes xD

User_3012 if you dont think you would enjoy discrete mathematics/ds/algorithms then probs comp sci is not for you. Depending on what area you end up as a software engineer, you wont need to use any of it, but its certainly required to pass the job interviews and useful to know when actually working as a software engineer. Personally I found aerospace boring, theres way too much content to even make it enjoyable. Yes you take a module on orbital mechanics and everyone gets excited because "rocket science" but next you are balls deep into wing aerodynamics and none of the maths makes sense or doing boring labs or materials module learning about metals. Where as computer science you will actually get to enjoy the content if you want to and it will actually get you internships and hence a job in the end. Also not forgetting comp sci pays crazy amounts where as traditional mech/aero has lower salaries. As I posted in many places on this website, I did aero @ southampton uni but got internship at google 2 months into first year and pretty much decided to bun aerospace engineering (i completed the degree) as my interests was more in software. I think Im enjoying life way more now working as a programmer, I'm the cto of a tech startup I started with some friends back in uni 2 years ago and we raised some funding and now based in new york. Im writing this reply at 12:05 am New york time as Im procrastinating on some unit tests
What can I do to see if would maybe enjoy the topics like discrete maths/algorithms etc?
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bigboateng_
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(Original post by User_3012)
What can I do to see if would maybe enjoy the topics like discrete maths/algorithms etc?
Before uni in 6th form pretty much if you enjoy the decisions maths modules you're good. If you havent taken those modules, you can probably look at it on the side, they go in depth
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History98
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Perhaps you should consider EEE, it's a very broad field with excellent career prospects, electricity is everywhere! And like other posters have said, there is usually a really small weighting on practicals on engineering degrees. In the later years, you can pretty much avoid practicals almost completely and take modules 100% exam modules.
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