Silentieyes
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mathstutor24
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Can you post your working so far, and what you're struggling with, then I can help
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Silentieyes
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(Original post by mathstutor24)
Can you post your working so far, and what you're struggling with, then I can help
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the bear
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so the bits you did not cross out are good.

you can write y/(y + 1) as (y+ 1 - 1) / ( y + 1 )
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hallzhuu
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Make use of partial fractions.
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mathstutor24
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This is correct:

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If you are struggling to integrate the LHS, you can use the substitution of u=y+1.
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mathstutor24
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Silentieyes - can you post the actual question for Q6 please?
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Silentieyes
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(Original post by mathstutor24)
Silentieyes - can you post the actual question for Q6 please?
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Silentieyes
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the bear
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(Original post by Silentieyes)
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mathstutor24
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The "y" circled in red should be a "u". Once you sub back in u=y+1, your final integrated equation should be:

ln\left | y+1 \right |-y-1=\frac{1}{2x}\left ( +C \right )

Then put in your values of x and y (as you have done) to find the value of C.
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mathstutor24
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Regarding question 6, you need to use the values you have been given of R and Theta to calculate the value of C (highlighted in yellow) to find the complete equation.
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