The importance of interactions between cells and other organisms (25 Marker)

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Rhysand'
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I don't understand the questions so can I get 5 points to expand regarding this question.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Rhysand')
I don't understand the questions so can I get 5 points to expand regarding this question.
If I understand the question right, you should give an explanation for the interaction between cells and cells between oragnisms with a reference to the function of a cell. What does the cells make so important for each other and the oragnisms?
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Rhysand'
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(Original post by Kallisto)
If I understand the question right, you should give an explanation for the interaction between cells and cells between oragnisms with a reference to the function of a cell. What does the cells make so important for each other and the oragnisms?
so it's to do with what the cell is producing to other cells and the organism.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Rhysand')
so it's to do with what the cell is producing to other cells and the organism.
The ways of communication between cells and organisns. To name some examples:

1.) Negative feedback (to control the creation of hormones for the growth of organisms).

2.) Trancription and Translation (for protein biosynthesis to provide oranisms).

3.) Energy supplier (Mitochondria for ATP)

4.) Electrochemical transduction (stimulus in nerve cells to send informations).

All of these and more things are interactions between cells and organisms...
Last edited by Kallisto; 3 months ago
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Rhysand')
I don't understand the questions so can I get 5 points to expand regarding this question.
Immunology, if you know anything about it, is a really good angle to expand on in this question. Cellular components of the immune system interact with invading organisms which are 'non-self' and trigger an immune response. You can take this further by considering how the recognition and destruction of a pathogenic 'non-self' organism is obviously beneficial, but the immune system can go 'wrong' and start to recognise harmless antigens like pollen as pathogenic, and mount an immune response against it. Think too about autoimmunity, another area where the immune system goes a bit wrong. Expanding out even further, think about pregnancy. A baby is 'non-self' (again, it's technically another organism), and ought to stimulate the immune system to mount a response against it - but this doesn't happen. Why?
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